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  1. #21
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    Thanks again.

    Quote Originally Posted by MuddyWaters View Post
    You get blisters on your heel, and little toe, in trail runners, but continue to disavow that you have a fit problem....

    OK.

    Precisely why im harsh.

    How many pr of shoes have you tried to solve the issue? Zero? Thats my guess.

    Yeah, $120 a pop is expensive to try, thats what running warehouse and zappos are for.

  2. #22
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    Thanks. I think I've just got some trial and error to do. Going to try thinner socks, cushioning tape, and also normal DT hikers without liners. Will post back once I have an idea what has best worked for me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    It's a good pt made that you don't want excessively tight and compressed toe box areas from too thick socks or sock layerings but the reverse can happen too. Toes will more around excessively causing blisters too. While i was transitioning to better fitting shoes when my pinky toes were still badly mishapened from improper past shoe fits I thought a loose wider toe box area was the immediate answer. Too much room in the toe box area resulted in too much forefoot and toe movement and more pressure on the pinky toe tip underside that it wasn't accustomed. Now my feet and toes habe splayed out more and the force is more equally balanced on each toe.

    I hope that helps

  3. #23
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    It's not just shoe fit.

    I used to occasionally get heel blisters right where it transitioned to the side of the heel from poor after market ortho/footbed fit.

    This same thing can happen with blisters on the bottom sides of toes and the outer sides of the big and pinky toes particularly so with Altras anatomical designs and wide toe boxes! BE CAREFUL getting footbeds that fit with altras.

    Yet another thing that can cause blisters when transitioning to zero drop little to no arch support wider than previous shoe model use is ones foot and possibly mechanics can change. When having a pinky toe that has previously been mashed under the adjacent toe going to altras can be an issue. These transitions might be better approached incrementally.

  4. #24
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    "These transitions might be better approached incrementally"

    Agreed!

  5. #25

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    If you are getting blisters you have a fit problem. If the shoe fit like it is suppose to then there wouldn't be blisters.
    Trail Miles: 3,918.6 - AT Trips: 70
    AT Map 1 Completion: 2004.8 - AT Map 2 Completion: 265.0
    ST Map 1 Completion: 26.0

  6. #26
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    Thanks all around for advice received. Will definitely be trying out several methods proposed here for relief!

  7. #27
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    I've experienced and seen it happen to others blister issues on toes occuring with proper shoe fit.

    But one example are great anatomically fitting shoes combined with too thick or unbreathable of a sock in high heat or gaiters. Anatomical fit can be dialed in but if the shoe itself doesnt also vent hot spots can develop turning into blisties. Then we can choose a shoe too open a mesh to get the breathability that lets too much sand and small stones in which can lead to hot spots. Jackie O "Yogi" talks about this in her gear recs of PCT shoes for the Mojave in her PCT guidebook.


    Yet, increasingly folks are moving away from these treasure chests of golden nuggets info sources mis-assuming minmalist answers are always the personal answer. That's not the path to mastery or nessarily the shortest ultimate path. Learn from what others have experinced and advise that you trust that are leaders. Learn from them what they've learned through their mistakes.

    Foot comfort is not optional for a backpacker.

  8. #28

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    A few tips:
    1. your hiking shoes must be at least one size BIGGER than your regular size shoes.
    2. Wear liner socks under your hiking socks to reduce friction. Your liners must be very thin and made of non cotton synthetic fabric (e.g. polyester).
    3. apply a thin layer of A & D ointment before hiking and massage well into the skin. Do not massage over blisters.
    4. Keep your feet dry, especially between the toes. I carry two pairs of liner socks, so i can change when one pair is wet.
    5. Let your feet "breathe" at the end of the day. If you still have the energy, you may wash them with a bottle of water.

  9. #29
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    Thanks!

    Quote Originally Posted by stephanD View Post
    A few tips:
    1. your hiking shoes must be at least one size BIGGER than your regular size shoes.

    2. Wear liner socks under your hiking socks to reduce friction. Your liners must be very thin and made of non cotton synthetic fabric (e.g. polyester). ✔
    3. apply a thin layer of A & D ointment before hiking and massage well into the skin. Do not massage over blisters. will try this!
    4. Keep your feet dry, especially between the toes. I carry two pairs of liner socks, so i can change when one pair is wet. ✔
    5. Let your feet "breathe" at the end of the day. If you still have the energy, you may wash them with a bottle of water.

  10. #30
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    Stephan is adding in another important factor in reducing hot spots beyond gear. User abilities in caring for their feet play a role.

    Dry those tootsies, air them out,...If wet feet are expected read through skurkas tending to wet feet piece. The info is there if we focus away from the fluff. The How to Fix your Feet book goes into good detail. And as Muddy said get pro advice from and buy running, hiking, and backpacking shoes from those in the know, typically running stores or those with excellent foot depTS that have industy qualified and certified associates.

    As hikers, runners, and backpackers our feet deserve no less.

  11. #31

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    Two points:

    1) Hike often. Weeks between hikes wont do. Feet acclimate. I cant explain why.

    2) See Rob at Outdoor 76 in Franklin, NC. He has a long history of fixing foot issues for thru hikers. Fixed mine.

    I have the same little toe blister issue just as you described. It is now manageable.

  12. #32
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    Thank you!

    Quote Originally Posted by FreeGoldRush View Post
    Two points:

    1) Hike often. Weeks between hikes won’t do. Feet acclimate. I can’t explain why. ✔

    2) See Rob at Outdoor 76 in Franklin, NC. He has a long history of fixing foot issues for thru hikers. Fixed mine. Will do!

    I have the same little toe blister issue just as you described. It is now manageable.

  13. #33

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    I used to get toe blisters when my feet get wet.

    I found liners just added extra heat and sweat. Some sort of body glide between the toes helped, and the Injinji toe socks helped even more. Cleaning and airing my feet/toes with alcohol wipes with an extended lunch break helped harden the skin a bit, and of course the same kind of drying out your feet care in the evenings.

    Never accept blister care advice from that guy on the trail with the huge weeping/shredded blisters.

  14. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gambit McCrae View Post
    I would eliminate the liners. When I changed from Darn Tuff to Smartwool PhD socks with the Altra combination my blisters went away and have never come back. 3 hiking seasons now, and about 1200+ miles with no blisters.

    I also would never tape toes together and I would try some body glide for lubrication.
    I have to agree with the liners, I used to use them and the same day I forgot to bring them and went without, my toe blister issues stopped cold. They may not seem to be a culprit, but the fraction of inches they take up can make a huge difference.

    Also, if you are using boots or trail shoes, you may want to take them back to the retailer and have the toe area giving you problems stretched a little. This works well with leather and some fabrics. If they are trail runners, you won't find much relief. If your retailer does not have a boot stretcher, find one who does so you can make minor adjustments.

    Lastly, I have to agree with Muddy. Shoes matter a lot, so if the simple "fixes" of socks/liners and lacing don't work, you are left with the probable cause. Find a retailer you can discuss this with, get some good advice, and a return policy that would allow you to use new footgear for a few miles to see if it cures the problem.

    Stay at it, these problems are solvable but can take time to wade through the process of elimination!

  15. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by Traveler View Post
    I have to agree with the liners, I used to use them and the same day I forgot to bring them and went without, my toe blister issues stopped cold. They may not seem to be a culprit, but the fraction of inches they take up can make a huge difference...................
    My experience is different. Liners and a sock change solved my blister issues. The material the liner was made from made all the difference. Changing sock brands helped, adding polyester liners made things worse. Silk liners were the key. Once I started wearing the silk liners I said good-bye to hot-spots and blisters.
    If you don't stand for something, you will fall for anything.

  16. #36
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    I cut out part of the insole to make room- field expediant solution that works

  17. #37
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    Try barrier wipes. You can find them on Amazon. Adhesive barrier wipes come in small little envelope similar to an alcohol prep pad. They are used as to provide a tacky adhesive base for wound dressings, and they also serve as a protective barrier for the skin.

    I apply by wiping them on some of my known trouble spots (like my small toe or heel) -- wipe on a thin layer, let dry, apply another layer and let dry. This essentially becomes a second skin, and I haven't deceloped any blisters on my toes or heel when I have applied this at the beginning of the day. I have found that a couple of applications can last a few days.

    If you already have developed a blister, wipe a thin film of this on the skin around the blister before taping -- it will help the tape adhere better, and protect the surrounding skin from damage or irritation from the tape.

    I'm not a doctor or a nurse, but this works for me.
    fortis fortuna adjuvat

  18. #38

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    Every foot,shoe,brand and style of sock is different.You have to experiment to find your own solutions.My silk liners are just not compatible with my shoes and outer socks.However,throw an REI light wool liner sock in the mix and all is good.

  19. #39
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    Supinate? Could the MTP replacement have changed your pronation even if only slightly on one side? You could be favoring walking on the outside edge of that pinky toe blister foot. Are your pinky toe blisters on just the one foot or both?

    I was using the Olympus 2.5 and 3 as a neutral. Where I goofed was going to zero drop from 4-5 stacks with a high arch. Altra stoCk beds are for flatish feet. They offer little in arch if going stock. First time ever in life I'm fkin dealing with debilitating PT. Ugh! I added arch support after markets but going to the zero drop screwed me up.

    I mention the after market orthos because it's hard to find bought after markets that fit the Altra foot bed shape properly in the forefoot for 14 size. If you don't get that right you can start getting blisties under the toe pads and maybe between the pinky and next toe

  20. #40
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    First of all....thanks for actually reading my question before blaring out "it's a shoe problem". I've got 50+ yrs experience wearing a variety of shoes and have had issues with heel blisters wearing all manner of them for as long as I can remember. I'm not concerned about the heel blisters, leukotape works well for that and I'm sure there are at least 1/2 dozen other solutions that work equally well. Everyone can have an opinion about shoes...it gets more complicated and specific when talking about feet! No one has my feet (and no one has yours or anyone else's). I'm looking for those willing to share their experiences solving similar problems with THEIR feet. There's a lot feet out there and someone has a solution that will work for me.

    The MTP replacement certainly could have changed my pronation on that side. That is the only side where I am experiencing blisters on the little toe. So I think this is certainly the most likely culprit, not necessarily "THE culprit" but the one that can't be ignored.

    Orthotics may be in my future. I've worn prescribed orthotics for plantar fasciitis years ago. I agree that goes on the list of possible solutions

    Also...I'm flat footed so I don't consider the zero drop design of Altras to be an issue. Having the problem only on one foot also lends credence to this. My Altras are sized appropriately and there's no slippage forward/back or side-to-side.

    Just based on my own experience and what I've read from others here, the first things I'll try (if only due to the ease and cost of trying) will be one or a combination of the below:

    * no liners (I've been using thin, synthetic liners)---several folks commented on this being the solution for them (wouldn't that be great!)
    * thinner socks (going to try DT running socks)
    * lubrication (Vaseline, hikergoo, etc.)
    * more powder (have been using a miniscule amount...must be sure to not use so much as to cause clumping though)
    * on longer hikes will definitely remove shoes and socks, clean/dry feet, and possibly even change socks




    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    Supinate? Could the MTP replacement have changed your pronation even if only slightly on one side? You could be favoring walking on the outside edge of that pinky toe blister foot. Are your pinky toe blisters on just the one foot or both?

    I was using the Olympus 2.5 and 3 as a neutral. Where I goofed was going to zero drop from 4-5 stacks with a high arch. Altra stoCk beds are for flatish feet. They offer little in arch if going stock. First time ever in life I'm fkin dealing with debilitating PT. Ugh! I added arch support after markets but going to the zero drop screwed me up.

    I mention the after market orthos because it's hard to find bought after markets that fit the Altra foot bed shape properly in the forefoot for 14 size. If you don't get that right you can start getting blisties under the toe pads and maybe between the pinky and next toe

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