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  1. #1

    Default Meals that we like to cook on a hike and when camping - Step by step recipes

    In this video we are willing to share with you 3 of our favourite easy to cook meals on a daily basis when we are on a long hike and out camping. We realized that these are the dishes that we most often go for and like the best. All of them are going to be vegetarian friendly, have simple ingredients, based on grains and using as much of the fresh vegetables as possible. So if you are a lover of home made and healthy food this is a video for you! Let's get started!

    Watch the full video here:

    Let us know which meal out of three you prefer more leaving us a comment below. And feel free to share your own favourite meals to cook when camping, we would love to learn new tricks and techniques.

  2. #2

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    Protein please. Can't hike on just vegetables and grains.

  3. #3

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    Two comments: (1) It is nice to have fresh vegetables on the trail but for most long distance hikers this is not really an option unless you are in town. Some carry some fruits/vegetables but they have to be consumed within a day or two before they spoil. (2) I agree with the previous comment that you need more proteins and fat too. Keep in mind that your body can convert fat and proteins to carbs for energy, but it cannot convert carbs into proteins. Otherwise, definitely healthier than ramen noodles.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by RockDoc View Post
    Protein please. Can't hike on just vegetables and grains.
    Quote Originally Posted by stephanD View Post
    Two comments: (1) It is nice to have fresh vegetables on the trail but for most long distance hikers this is not really an option unless you are in town. Some carry some fruits/vegetables but they have to be consumed within a day or two before they spoil. (2) I agree with the previous comment that you need more proteins and fat too. Keep in mind that your body can convert fat and proteins to carbs for energy, but it cannot convert carbs into proteins. Otherwise, definitely healthier than ramen noodles.
    Thank you for your comments. This is just some variations on what we can cook every day. We are aware of the importance of proteins in the diet and use nuts, cheese, sometimes beans and eggs for that. We are pretty sure that we can get proteins from plant based foods as well.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Walking Nature World View Post
    Thank you for your comments. This is just some variations on what we can cook every day. We are aware of the importance of proteins in the diet and use nuts, cheese, sometimes beans and eggs for that. We are pretty sure that we can get proteins from plant based foods as well.
    Proteins are divided into two groups: complete and incomplete. Our body needs complete proteins to function properly. complete proteins can be obtain from animal sources; meat, eggs and dairy. You can obtain complete proteins from non-animal sources (seeds, grain, beans, legume,tubers, etc.) as well, but you have to combined two or more. Classic examples are rice and beans, peanut butter and whole grain bread sandwich, or the classic Italian dish pasta e fagioli.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by stephanD View Post
    You can obtain complete proteins from non-animal sources (seeds, grain, beans, legume,tubers, etc.) as well, but you have to combined two or more.
    This is overly simplistic, but I agree with the intent.

    Most plant foodstuffs do not supply a complete spread of the amino acids we need, but some of them do (Soy and Quinoa in particular come to mind), just like animal sources.

    Also, the implication here is that any two non-complete sources will work, and someone might go out and stockpile 4 foods short of the same amino acid. They need to be complementary to each other. Pinto beans and black beans would probably not make a pairing, for example.

  7. #7

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    Anyone care to suggest some good balanced protein menus for a three to five day outing?Thanks!
    (honestly,I have always just packed something easy to do in a freezer bag)

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    Quote Originally Posted by RockDoc View Post
    Protein please. Can't hike on just vegetables and grains.
    These two have probably hiked more miles than quite a few WB posters including myself the last few months and they do NOT look they are wasting away. It seems they know enough how to obtain their protein.

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    Consider this my friends. https://outdoorherbivore.com/trail-sprout-kit/

    If the two of you would be willing to try and grow nutritious sprouts on trail I will buy and send you one of OH Trail Sprouting Kits. PM if you are interested with a mailing address to send it. It will be my gift to you two inspiring wonderful people.

  10. #10

    Default It's not that hard

    Quote Originally Posted by RockDoc View Post
    Protein please. Can't hike on just vegetables and grains.
    It's not that hard. See the classic examples within the Recipes for a Small Planet book -
    https://www.amazon.com/Recipes-Small...s%2C150&sr=1-1
    And it can be cheap too.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by RockDoc View Post
    Protein please. Can't hike on just vegetables and grains.
    Frozen meat strips or cubes (keep them on the smallish side for faster roasting) will keep fresh for a day or two on the trail - depends upon ambient temperature. I would go with beef over chicken, but sausage such as kielbasa works well too. Freeze the meat strips or cubes or sausage along with any favorite spices, put it in a ziplock, squeeze out air, sandwhich it between two pieces of Styrofoam insulation or in insulated bag, and then inside another ziplock freezer bag. Keep it buried in the center of your pack - the more insulation around it the better. Take one of those long marshmallow forks with you - they weigh about an ounce or so, or cut a green spit. Put meat on fork/spit. Roast over campfire (burning wood down to coals works best). If thru-hiking, ask at grocery on zero day if they will freeze it (a small NY strip steak works well) for you. Fresh meat first and maybe even second day out. Bacon and breakfast sausage work too! Kabobs are also a possibility. Yes, it's additional logistics. But I see it no differently than any other luxury item, and it's one that only weighs you down until you eat it the first or second night out. Be prepared to fend off bears and hungry thru-hikers

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    Freeze dried chicken, stuffing mix, salt, 2/3 of a stick of butter.

    Maybe a freeze dried vegetable if available.

    Light. Protein rich. Calories. 1.7 liter pot allows a meal for two.

    Note that without the butter and salt it really doesn’t taste worth eating.

    Tortillas, shredded cheese and pepperoni slices from trail magic make for good quesadillas.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ethesis View Post
    Freeze dried chicken, stuffing mix, salt, 2/3 of a stick of butter.

    Maybe a freeze dried vegetable if available.

    Light. Protein rich. Calories. 1.7 liter pot allows a meal for two.

    Note that without the butter and salt it really doesn’t taste worth eating.

    Tortillas, shredded cheese and pepperoni slices from trail magic make for good quesadillas.
    Stuffing mix sounds like a great ingredient to experiment with.
    You can walk in another person's shoes, but only with your feet

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by FollowMrMuir View Post
    It's not that hard. See the classic examples within the Recipes for a Small Planet book -
    https://www.amazon.com/Recipes-Small...s%2C150&sr=1-1
    And it can be cheap too.
    Thanks for the book suggestion.I plan to look into it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4eyedbuzzard View Post
    Frozen meat strips or cubes (keep them on the smallish side for faster roasting) will keep fresh for a day or two on the trail - depends upon ambient temperature. I would go with beef over chicken, but sausage such as kielbasa works well too. Freeze the meat strips or cubes or sausage along with any favorite spices, put it in a ziplock, squeeze out air, sandwhich it between two pieces of Styrofoam insulation or in insulated bag, and then inside another ziplock freezer bag. Keep it buried in the center of your pack - the more insulation around it the better. Take one of those long marshmallow forks with you - they weigh about an ounce or so, or cut a green spit. Put meat on fork/spit. Roast over campfire (burning wood down to coals works best). If thru-hiking, ask at grocery on zero day if they will freeze it (a small NY strip steak works well) for you. Fresh meat first and maybe even second day out. Bacon and breakfast sausage work too! Kabobs are also a possibility. Yes, it's additional logistics. But I see it no differently than any other luxury item, and it's one that only weighs you down until you eat it the first or second night out. Be prepared to fend off bears and hungry thru-hikers
    If I smell salmon kabobs grilling on trail I'll consider inviting myself.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4eyedbuzzard View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by RockDoc View Post
    Protein please. Can't hike on just vegetables and grains.
    Frozen meat strips or cubes (keep them on the smallish side for faster roasting) will keep fresh for a day or two on the trail - depends upon ambient temperature. I would go with beef over chicken, but sausage such as kielbasa works well too. Freeze the meat strips or cubes or sausage along with any favorite spices, put it in a ziplock, squeeze out air, sandwhich it between two pieces of Styrofoam insulation or in insulated bag, and then inside another ziplock freezer bag. Keep it buried in the center of your pack - the more insulation around it the better. Take one of those long marshmallow forks with you - they weigh about an ounce or so, or cut a green spit. Put meat on fork/spit. Roast over campfire (burning wood down to coals works best). If thru-hiking, ask at grocery on zero day if they will freeze it (a small NY strip steak works well) for you. Fresh meat first and maybe even second day out. Bacon and breakfast sausage work too! Kabobs are also a possibility. Yes, it's additional logistics. But I see it no differently than any other luxury item, and it's one that only weighs you down until you eat it the first or second night out. Be prepared to fend off bears and hungry thru-hikers
    Raw meat, especially chicken, in your food bag or pack seems like a big risk for foodborne diseases. Cured meats are probably ok if they're sealed.
    You can walk in another person's shoes, but only with your feet

  17. #17

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    I have seen hikers cooking burgers on a hot stone in a camp fire pit once. Best burger i have ever eaten...

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by devoidapop View Post
    Raw meat, especially chicken, in your food bag or pack seems like a big risk for foodborne diseases. Cured meats are probably ok if they're sealed.
    Not really i hiked in fersh chicken breast on a weekend caught a buntch of thru hikers fed them...uding cast iron skillet and rice also,,,
    My love for life is quit simple .i get uo in the moring and then i go to bed at night. What I do inbween is to occupy my time. Cary Grant

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by RockDoc View Post
    Protein please. Can't hike on just vegetables and grains.
    Common misconception. My backpacking diet (and home diet) has been vegetarian for 41 years and vegan for the last 3 years.

    My backpacking food bags contain brown rice and beans along with TVP. Peanut butter is mixed in with oatmeal too. I also make PB sandwiches on whole grain bread and/or rice cakes. I can home-dehydrate a significant amount of beans and rice---and recently made a large Outdoor Herbivore order as some of their meals are outstanding. And will carry a couple lbs of their powdered soy milk on my next trip (mixes great in morning tea with honey).

    TRIP 173 004-XL.jpg
    Cooked organic brown rice dried and ready to be ziplocked.

    TRIP 173 003-XL.jpg
    Pinto beans home dried. Mix the two for complete protein.

    Trip 183 (3)-XL.jpg
    Another option---dry canned foods.

    P1000032-XL.jpg
    Sometimes the dried hard kernels of brown do not rehydrate too well so I thoroughly blend cooked rice with water and dry in sheets for quick cooking in the field.

    Quote Originally Posted by stephanD View Post
    Two comments: (1) It is nice to have fresh vegetables on the trail but for most long distance hikers this is not really an option unless you are in town. Some carry some fruits/vegetables but they have to be consumed within a day or two before they spoil. (2) I agree with the previous comment that you need more proteins and fat too. Keep in mind that your body can convert fat and proteins to carbs for energy, but it cannot convert carbs into proteins. Otherwise, definitely healthier than ramen noodles.
    On my last trip I augmented my diet with copious wild ramps---

    Trip 211 (98)-XL.jpg
    Ramps with vegan mac and cheese.

    Trip 211 (150)-XL.jpg
    Brown rice with ramps.

    Trip 193 (62)-XL.jpg
    On my trips I always take a goodly amount of olive oil. On my next trip it'll be both olive oil and pumpkin seed oil.

    IMG_7893-L.jpg
    Nut butters are heavy but offer the best protein/fat combo for me. Here I am on the Deep Creek trail with all my precious nut butters at the start of a trip---PB, cashew, almond butters.

  20. #20
    Registered User hobbs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tipi Walter View Post
    Common misconception. My backpacking diet (and home diet) has been vegetarian for 41 years and vegan for the last 3 years.

    My backpacking food bags contain brown rice and beans along with TVP. Peanut butter is mixed in with oatmeal too. I also make PB sandwiches on whole grain bread and/or rice cakes. I can home-dehydrate a significant amount of beans and rice---and recently made a large Outdoor Herbivore order as some of their meals are outstanding. And will carry a couple lbs of their powdered soy milk on my next trip (mixes great in morning tea with honey).

    TRIP 173 004-XL.jpg
    Cooked organic brown rice dried and ready to be ziplocked.

    TRIP 173 003-XL.jpg
    Pinto beans home dried. Mix the two for complete protein.

    Trip 183 (3)-XL.jpg
    Another option---dry canned foods.

    P1000032-XL.jpg
    Sometimes the dried hard kernels of brown do not rehydrate too well so I thoroughly blend cooked rice with water and dry in sheets for quick cooking in the field.



    On my last trip I augmented my diet with copious wild ramps---

    Trip 211 (98)-XL.jpg
    Ramps with vegan mac and cheese.

    Trip 211 (150)-XL.jpg
    Brown rice with ramps.

    Trip 193 (62)-XL.jpg
    On my trips I always take a goodly amount of olive oil. On my next trip it'll be both olive oil and pumpkin seed oil.

    IMG_7893-L.jpg
    Nut butters are heavy but offer the best protein/fat combo for me. Here I am on the Deep Creek trail with all my precious nut butters at the start of a trip---PB, cashew, almond butters.
    I think they need to search the food and cooking. You posted more picture and advice on Dehydrating it also got me a meat eater to try some of the Vegatarian companies products your were using. I found them healthy and quit good. I also ordered from outdoor herbivor to trey their goods.
    My love for life is quit simple .i get uo in the moring and then i go to bed at night. What I do inbween is to occupy my time. Cary Grant

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