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  1. #201

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    Quote Originally Posted by TNhiker View Post
    well.......

    more people have been killed by snakes while attending church than in the woods.......
    OK, now that's funny. And true.
    UL, because nobody ever asks "How can I make my pack heavier?"

  2. #202
    ME => GA 19AT3 rickb's Avatar
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    Can someone (Dogwood?) download the 228 page PDF that is linked from this page, and expand upon what they have found?

    https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/all/40914

  3. #203
    ME => GA 19AT3 rickb's Avatar
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    For those with shorter attention spans, the excerp form the larger document is also linked here, and is apropos to discusion at hand:


    https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/all/40914

  4. #204

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    Quote Originally Posted by rickb View Post
    Can someone (Dogwood?) download the 228 page PDF that is linked from this page, and expand upon what they have found?

    https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/all/40914
    Conclusion: Some people are idiots. They take more risk because they think they can push a button and instantly summon the cavalry. The rest is documentation of that fact.
    UL, because nobody ever asks "How can I make my pack heavier?"

  5. #205

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    I wouldn't think of bringing excess technology on a hike, it is just rude. https://i.imgur.com/QBIZPVk.jpg A4tAtzp.jpg
    Last edited by greenmtnboy; 04-12-2019 at 20:29.


  6. #206
    Registered User JPritch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Puddlefish View Post
    People all too often draw arbitrary lines in the sand, call one side good, and the other side bad, based on where they're standing at the moment.

    People who hike faster than me, don't really enjoy the outdoors, because they're going too fast to take it in properly. Fact.
    People who hike slower than me, don't really enjoy the outdoors, because they're going too slow to see much of it. Fact.

    People who stay in stealth camp don't really enjoy the trail experience, because they miss out on all the neat people. Fact
    People who stay in shelters don't really enjoy the trail experience, because shelters are noisy and filthy. Fact.

    People who wear brimmed hats, don't really enjoy hiking, because they miss out on 20% of the view upwards. That's 20% less of nature they enjoy. Fact.
    People who wear shoes/boots/footwear, don't really enjoy the outdoors. They miss the tactile sensation of feeling the trail under their feet. Fact.
    People who wear sunglasses, don't really enjoy the outdoors, as they see a reduced spectrum of light. Fact.
    People who use bugspray, don't really embrace the outdoor experience, as ticks and illness are an important part of nature. Fact.
    People who use earbuds, don't really enjoy the outdoors. Fact.

    Old people who wake early, and rudely speak at full volume when I'm trying to sleep, are the bane of my existence. Fact.
    Young people, who stay up late, and rudely make noise while I'm trying to sleep, are the bane of my existence. Fact.


    All of these "facts" are seriously flawed and require a great deal of your own perspective to process. They all rely greatly on your personal interpretation of what enjoying nature consists of. We all draw the lines in the sand, at slightly different spots. We hike, camp, tent, backpack, walk, amble, run, in a way that works best for us. It's tacky to pretend someone else is "doing it wrong" because they're doing it differently. It's insulting to diminish someone else's experience, because you have a different preference and different experiences.

    This is not a call for anarchy. We can hike our own hike, without intruding on anyone else's hike.
    Points taken. You just gotta keep in mind that WhiteBlaze is like gate-keeping central when it comes to hiking. Just laugh it off.
    While searching for that unknown edge in life, never forget to look home. For the greatest edge you can find in life is to stand in the protective shadow of those who love you.

  7. #207
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    I never hike without my phone! Nor do I ever use it on the trail (not once, in several dozen trips so far). I am 6oz heavier now though, so I've got that going for me.

  8. #208
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickb View Post
    Can someone (Dogwood?) download the 228 page PDF that is linked from this page, and expand upon what they have found?

    https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/all/40914
    Rick, you and your wife's HI couch surfing privileges have just expired.

  9. #209

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    I play Candy Crush late at night in my tent...when no one is watching.

  10. #210
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    Quote Originally Posted by Traffic Jam View Post
    I play Candy Crush late at night in my tent...when no one is watching.

    rotfl.........You should download the rad Candyland app. It's just like hiking the AT rolling the die and moving forward on a 30" wide tread. Gumdrop Mts and Peppermint Forest.

  11. #211
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    Quote Originally Posted by JPritch View Post
    Points taken. You just gotta keep in mind that WhiteBlaze is like gate-keeping central when it comes to hiking. Just laugh it off.
    Ain't that the truth.

  12. #212

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    Quote Originally Posted by Traffic Jam View Post
    I play Candy Crush late at night in my tent...when no one is watching.
    People watch you in your tent?
    Do you charge for this " entertainment"?

    I watch movies and tv shows i download, or read, and review days photos and next day plans.
    After watching a bunch of original star-trek episodes one night, i remarked to a guy i was hiking with how incredibly the plots werent outdated after 40+ years. Turned out..he was somewhat of an expert on star trek. I learnt a lot about it and its creator , and avanced social themes of the show over next couple hours.

  13. #213

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    Quote Originally Posted by MuddyWaters View Post
    People watch you in your tent?
    Do you charge for this " entertainment"?

    .
    Taking advantage of pigs is how I fund my hiking trips, don’t cha know.


  14. #214
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    This passage from David Brill's As Far As the Eye Can See (about his 1979 thru hike) caught my eye:

    "If there was any sense of isolation from being on the trail for months at a time, it was isolation from the world and national news. We spent from three to ten days at a stretch between resupply trips to town. We didn't carry radios, and, during our stopovers, we rarely picked up newspapers. Frankly, there wasn't much going on in the world that interested us..."

    P.S. Brill's book is easily my favorite about the AT. I just began re-reading it, something I've done every three or four years since the '90s. 1979 seems like ancient history.

  15. #215
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Roper View Post
    This passage from David Brill's As Far As the Eye Can See (about his 1979 thru hike) caught my eye:
    How would I find that essay?


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  16. #216
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    As Far as the Eye Can See was recently reprinted by the University of Tennessee Press (around 2013 or thereabouts). That was its seventh printing. You should be able to find the book on Amazon or via UT Press.

    Brill is one of the finest outdoors writers there is. His description of seeing spring come to the southern AT is absolutely perfect writing.

  17. #217

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    Quote Originally Posted by Traillium View Post
    How would I find that essay?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Google.

    Amazon has plenty vintage used copies for about $8

    Apparently there is a very cheap postal shipping rate for books that used book sellers use. Media mail? However it is slooowww. Like it can take 3 weeks to get it to you. So beware. But no one wants to pay $10 shipping for $5 book, so its a good thing, but slow.

    I gave mine away to public library after reading
    Last edited by MuddyWaters; 04-18-2019 at 06:01.

  18. #218
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    Quote Originally Posted by MuddyWaters View Post
    Amazon has plenty vintage used copies for about $8
    Thanks!


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  19. #219
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    In 1986, me and two friends canoed 125 miles of the Ogeechee River in southeast Georgia over five nights and six days. I think the only town we went into was Millen, hitchhiking to a Dairy Queen. That day we learned that the Air Force had bombed some target identified as a military complex in Libya. I recall how odd it seemed that important events were taking places without us knowing about them relatively immediately.

    I've never owned a cell phone or Smart phone, etc., so when I venture into the woods for a day hike or a section hike, I do get a sense of stepping out of the world briefly. I like that. From reading WB and talking with folks generally, through the years, I know there are a lot of people that enjoy technology and have made their peace with it in the woods, appreciating the advantages it offers.

    I haven't read this thread, except for perhaps the last ten posts, because it's all been said in WB before, ten thousands times. There are basically two views of thought, and the twain shall not meet.

  20. #220

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    Quote Originally Posted by greenpete View Post
    This topic has probably been raised before on this Forum. Nonetheless, I think it’s good to continue the discussion. People love gadgets, especially men. I’m probably in the minority, but I feel there’s too much gadgetry on the trail these days. Unless one hikes as an athletic pursuit (for a challenge, for fitness, etc.), the whole idea of a mountain hike is about getting out and enjoying nature, and separating oneself from the artificiality and cushy conveniences of urban/suburban society. Isn’t it? If so, why are so many people dragging the digital revolution onto the trail? Don’t devices like handheld computers (iPhones) and various “apps” compromise the back-to-nature experience? Some things are essential, I realize. Manmade tents, sleeping bags, stoves, matches, etc. And cameras and non-computerized phones are convenient. But have we gone too far? Have we “over-safety’ed” and “over-convenienced” ourselves?

    Would love to see how many people, if any, agree with me.
    Even though I have been addicted to the internet for a while when I go to the woods here lately I sometimes leave my gadget at home, or if I take it I turn it on when there might be service to check for guests wanting to come in. And what I have witnessed on occasion is a hiker will pick up a mail drop and their phone and other gadgets will be in there. I think more folks are slowly leaving the things at home. Earl Shaffer sure did not have gadgets. or Gene Epsy and Grandma Gatewood just to name a few.

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