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Thread: In camp shoes

  1. #41

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    I never bring camp shoes but I often wish I did. I either go barefoot around camp or I loosen the laces on my shoes a ton so that they become like slip-on slippers. It sucks if my shoes are wet, though. Sometimes I just do the hike in the "camp shoes", meaning that I'll hike in Chacos instead of trail running shoes and leave the trail running shoes at home. That works out pretty great as long as long as it's a trail that's in decent condition.
    Some knew me as Piper, others as just Diane.
    I hiked the PCT: Mexico to Mt. Shasta, 2008. Santa Barbara to Canada, 2009.

  2. #42
    Registered User scope's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbhikes View Post
    ...I loosen the laces on my shoes a ton so that they become like slip-on slippers. It sucks if my shoes are wet, though...
    This is what I love about the Salomon lacing, I can leave real loose and as you say, use as slip-ons without having to worry about dangling laces to trip over on midnight excursions.

    I'd use a P-bottle instead of getting my dry socks wet, though.

    Around camp, if you're using trail runners you don't need any other shoes. I've hiked in boots before where the first thing you want to do in camp is take them off, and the last thing you want to do is put them on again before a.m. Used to take crocs. Heavy, really? So I get having "camp" shoes and the whole weight thing is a personal choice. If you're not doing loads of miles, why not crocs or whatever feels good on your feet as a luxury extra? For me, the Salomon's changed my view on the need for camp shoes.
    "I wonder if anyone else has an ear so tuned and sharpened as I have, to detect the music, not of the spheres, but of earth, subtleties of major and minor chord that the wind strikes upon the tree branches. Have you ever heard the earth breathe... ?"
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  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerosene View Post
    I bought these years ago, and they were expensive even when at the sale price, but I was desperate for something less bulky than Crocs. I ended up cutting their weight almost in have by removing the inner sockliner, and while they aren't as comfortable (or water resistant) they are only 7.8 oz for the pair (size 10) and take up a lot less space in my pack.
    I agree... for a touch of added comfort, simply put a simple, flimsy running shoe insert instead of the liners, and you have your comfort for camp & town walking....
    "How can something this hard be so much fun".

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by HighlandsHiker View Post
    Thx for the tip, Game Warden - and also TX Aggie for seconding the recommendation. Followed the link and liked what I saw, ordered a pair of Z-Trails - they just came in, exactly what I was looking for, lightweight, flexible, don't take up much space in my pack, and they're actual shoes that I could hike in if needed. At $80 they're not cheap, but the 5,000 sole guarantee means I'll get my money's worth. Much appreciated -
    Quote Originally Posted by OwenM View Post
    Thanking them? For seducing you? I just ordered a pair with a sale code for $66. Had been considering them for awhile, but feel like y'all pushed me over the edge, and should be held accountable. I think all three of you should have to send me $22 apiece for forcing me to buy them

    I'll take them to the beach in a couple of weeks, but they'll be used almost exclusively for camp, and should last forever.
    Lol, good stuff. For what it’s worth, I took my daughter on a single night hike last week, just over 7 miles round-trip. I wore my Xero Z-Trails the entire time, I did have a pair of trail runners just in case.

    Trail was typical mid-Atlantic with a mix of dirt, roots, and rocks. On the trail the shoes were awesome. You do have to be careful for the rouge twig that jumps under your feet, but otherwise great.

    We camped near an overlook that had a decent amount of bouldering. Before the rain hit, the shoes held fine. After the rains came, they were still as good as most any shoe, but wet, flat rocks sitting at an angle still caused me to slide a little. Not fast and hard enough to cause a concern, you just have to learn which boulders to be wary of and foot placement.

    Overall I wouldn’t hesitate to use them as a 3 season all use shoe for general hiking. If I were planning on doing 20+ mile days I might rethink it, but I would still have them with me for wet sections and for camp shoes.


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  5. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by PennyPincher View Post
    my trail runners are so light I have actually considered carrying a second pair. this would have many benefits. dry shoes at end of day. dry shoes next day if trail runners didn't dry overnight. if 1 pair "blows out" I can still hike without issue and grab a second pair and ditch the "blown out" pair. I would never have to worry about getting a brand new pair and having issues until they get broken in as I could swap between the new and old pair during the break in period if necessary.
    Please, tell us which trail runners you use and if you know how heavy they are? You make some good points.

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by PennyPincher View Post
    my trail runners are so light I have actually considered carrying a second pair. this would have many benefits. dry shoes at end of day. dry shoes next day if trail runners didn't dry overnight. if 1 pair "blows out" I can still hike without issue and grab a second pair and ditch the "blown out" pair. I would never have to worry about getting a brand new pair and having issues until they get broken in as I could swap between the new and old pair during the break in period if necessary.
    PP, I too am wondering about your so light trail runners. I guess I’m just questioning, but I’ve owned many pairs of running shoes and trail runners, and TR are almost never “light”, since they are obviously beefier than running shoes. Certainly, I’d be surprised to learn that any running or trail running shoes are anywhere close in weigh to a pair of camp shoes ( say the Vivo Barefoot). That said, I’ve hiked thousands of miles in TR, and never had a pair “blow out”. Maybe I was just lucky, but that seems like a lot of extra weight on a long distance hike just for a “ what if” circumstance. Finally, as has been stated previously, new TR almost never need to be broken in.

    We all know this is about doing what you want, what works best for you, I’ve just never seen anyone carry two pair of trail runners.
    "How can something this hard be so much fun".

  7. #47
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    Heavy thumb.....
    "How can something this hard be so much fun".

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    When I was a Boy Scout I used all-leather moccasins as camp shoes. They must weight less than Crocs and they certainly take up less space in the pack. I notice that Bass Pro still sells Minnetonka-brand leather-bottom moccasins.

  9. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by orthofingers View Post
    Please, tell us which trail runners you use and if you know how heavy they are? You make some good points.
    I currently, and for the last 4 years, wear New Balance Minimus, women's 8.5. I weighed both pairs. One pair is just shy of 12 oz, the other 13 oz.

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  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by PennyPincher View Post
    I currently, and for the last 4 years, wear New Balance Minimus, women's 8.5. I weighed both pairs. One pair is just shy of 12 oz, the other 13 oz.

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    I can vouch for the weight of the Minimus Trail as well. Very light, decent traction, just beware of pointy rocks. They are a minimalist/zero drop shoe, so just keep that in mind. I think the tread stack height is somewhere around the 6mm range. (Same goes for the Xero Z-Trail I mentioned previously)


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  11. #51

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    I just got my Redhead Ragin shoes delivered today.
    Wasn't sure which size to order, so I ordered both up and down from the 11.5 hiking boots size I wear.
    The 12 fits. The 11's will go to some lucky person who needs them.

  12. #52
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    Current thru-hiker, no camp shoes. I wear Hoka Speedgoats and they are all I need.

    If car camping I'll bring crocs or flip flops, but no camp shoes when I'm backpacking.

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