Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 32
  1. #1

    Question ?? Camping at locations other than shelters/campsites on the AT

    I'm hiking the Georgia portion of the AT in late June and am wondering about alternative (stealth?) sites. I'm thinking it would be nice to have some options other than the campsite/shelters I see in books like AWOL's guide. If using LNT ethics, can I just camp off trail anywhere in the AT corridor?

  2. #2

    Default

    Sort of. There are good places to camp and there are bad places to camp and there are places where it just isn't physically possible to camp. Locations noted in AWOL are the good places to camp and should be used rather then creating your own place to camp.
    Follow slogoen on Instagram.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    05-05-2011
    Location
    state of confusion
    Posts
    9,869
    Journal Entries
    1

    Default

    If there's a flat spot somebody's camped there before so don't worry about it. The thing is, there ain't that many flat spots.... You got to have faith that one's going to turn up... Without somebody already camped in it..... By the time you're ready to stop.

  4. #4

    Default

    there were tons of places to camp along the trail in GA on the AT other than at shelters.
    https://tinyurl.com/MyFDresults

    A vigorous five-mile walk will do more good for an unhappy but otherwise healthy adult than all the medicine and psychology in the world. ~Paul Dudley White

  5. #5
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-28-2007
    Location
    Georgia and Hawaii
    Posts
    18,008

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PennyPincher View Post
    there were tons of places to camp along the trail in GA on the AT other than at shelters.
    Exactly! Learn to read a detailed topo map. Places to sleep are unlimited in GA. Very often just after or sometimes before a shelter are spots as natural shelter overflow areas. If you hang no need to find a flat spot. If you bivy less need for a large flat site. If you have a smaller footprint tent more opps. If fair weather is in the forecast maybe no need to put up a tent. Cowboying makes for easier set ups, break downs, and even more sites to sleep.

  6. #6
    GSMNP 900 Miler
    Join Date
    02-25-2007
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Age
    53
    Posts
    4,575
    Journal Entries
    1
    Images
    5

    Default

    You need to know the local camping rules because they vary in certain areas along the AT.

    The most well known rule variance is that in the Smokies, you must camp at designated campsites/shelters along the AT. Stealth camping in GSMNP is illegal.

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HooKooDooKu View Post
    You need to know the local camping rules because they vary in certain areas along the AT.

    The most well known rule variance is that in the Smokies, you must camp at designated campsites/shelters along the AT. Stealth camping in GSMNP is illegal.
    The OP specifically stated he would be hiking in GA.
    https://tinyurl.com/MyFDresults

    A vigorous five-mile walk will do more good for an unhappy but otherwise healthy adult than all the medicine and psychology in the world. ~Paul Dudley White

  8. #8

    Default

    Of course you can. This works best when Hammock camping. Grab two liters of water (or more) an hour or two before you are ready to stop. Then keep your eyes open for a good spot while hiking. It's a great idea for extending your daily mileage when the shelter sites would otherwise make you stop too early or hike too late.

  9. #9
    Registered User Red Sky's Avatar
    Join Date
    11-29-2016
    Location
    Chattanooga, TN
    Age
    63
    Posts
    71

    Default

    I found lots of good spots along the way in GA and NC. Guthooks and Awol both show the most heavily used locations, but there are many, many more.

  10. #10
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-14-2017
    Location
    Pasadena, Maryland
    Age
    48
    Posts
    486

    Default

    If you want to stealth camp along the AT, the best option, quite frankly, is a hammock. No need to worry about a flat spot or clearing the ground to keep your air pad from puncturing. You can pretty much hang anywhere along the green tunnel.

    I havenít done Georgia, but Iíve hiked several places in the Mid-Atlantic, and as long as youíre not in top of a bald, the choices are near endless. And if solitude and staying clear of other hikers is your motivation, there simply is no better choice.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  11. #11
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-28-2007
    Location
    Georgia and Hawaii
    Posts
    18,008

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Red Sky View Post
    I found lots of good spots along the way in GA and NC. Guthooks and Awol both show the most heavily used locations, but there are many, many more.
    And, by advising others to use these apps these locations receive further beat down usage. Plus, they are all private profiteers. For me, I'd rather support the trail financially through the NP system, trail clubs, Wilderness Management Areas, environmental protections for the AT corridor, SP's and the ATC than private profiteers. There would be no AT or PCT or CDT or JMT or,... if it wasn't for the efforts of groups like these that provide a wealth of often unappreciated trail excellence.

  12. #12
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-08-2012
    Location
    Taghkanic, New York, United States
    Posts
    3,090
    Journal Entries
    11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    And, by advising others to use these apps these locations receive further beat down usage. ....
    This is part of LNT, don't make campsites, find them (aka the best campsites are found, not made). By advising someone to use already established campsites you are advising them not to make their own. That's a LNT win.

  13. #13
    Registered User LittleRock's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-10-2014
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Age
    34
    Posts
    593
    Images
    8

    Default

    There are stealth sites everywhere in GA, probably more than anywhere else on the AT. Many of them are easily visible from the trail. You will have no trouble finding a place to camp.
    It's all good in the woods.

  14. #14
    Registered User scope's Avatar
    Join Date
    03-08-2006
    Location
    Chamblee, GA
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,501
    Images
    34

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TX Aggie View Post
    If you want to stealth camp along the AT, the best option, quite frankly, is a hammock...
    Exactly correct. But I think we should drop the stealth as it infers going off trail to create a site.

    Most of the sites listed are those that have water, so my assumption is that you're willing to carry water to the non-listed site. If that's the case, you'll find plenty of these spots along the way. Not really stealth because they are created by the hordes that start thru hikes every year, so its not like you're creating off-trail sites. Lot of them aren't too far from water and most have makeshift fire rings, though I sort of loathe seeing these sites chopped up to create firewood, so if we're talking LNT, that's my biggest concern. I go without a fire these days as I don't sit around much in camp (hammock). I'd say you can't go 2 miles without seeing a good flat site for a tent, and can't go a mile without seeing a cleared site that has been used for a tent, even if not all that flat.

    But really, get a hammock and stop worrying about flat earth stuff.
    "I wonder if anyone else has an ear so tuned and sharpened as I have, to detect the music, not of the spheres, but of earth, subtleties of major and minor chord that the wind strikes upon the tree branches. Have you ever heard the earth breathe... ?"
    - Kate Chopin

  15. #15

    Default

    Thanks for the feedback and discussion everyone! I enjoy learning new things from y'all and hearing your perspectives gives me things to ponder about my set-up and theories.

    Quote Originally Posted by MuddyWaters View Post
    If there's a flat spot somebody's camped there before so don't worry about it. The thing is, there ain't that many flat spots.... You got to have faith that one's going to turn up... Without somebody already camped in it..... By the time you're ready to stop.
    Brother, I believe!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    Exactly! Learn to read a detailed topo map. Places to sleep are unlimited in GA. Very often just after or sometimes before a shelter are spots as natural shelter overflow areas. If you hang no need to find a flat spot. If you bivy less need for a large flat site. If you have a smaller footprint tent more opps.
    This is a great idea and a skill I would like to develop. My footprint it 84''x52'' which is likely BIG by today's standards. I'm 6'5'' so there weren't many options for tents, which I'll plan on using...for now...

    Quote Originally Posted by PennyPincher View Post
    The OP specifically stated he would be hiking in GA.
    There's always someone who doesn't read/listen to the directions, haha!

    Quote Originally Posted by Red Sky View Post
    I found lots of good spots along the way in GA and NC. Guthooks and Awol both show the most heavily used locations, but there are many, many more.
    Glad to know there are others. More on apps/books below.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    And, by advising others to use these apps these locations receive further beat down usage. Plus, they are all private profiteers. For me, I'd rather support the trail financially through the NP system, trail clubs, Wilderness Management Areas, environmental protections for the AT corridor, SP's and the ATC than private profiteers. There would be no AT or PCT or CDT or JMT or,... if it wasn't for the efforts of groups like these that provide a wealth of often unappreciated trail excellence.
    BINGO! I could not agree more! I cannot get on board with paying for Guthook, even for the individual sections. The info it provides is probably amazing, but unless there's proof that the person profiting from apps like that is giving back to the trail, it's a no go for me. I should also say the AWOL guide i referenced in the OP is my father-in-laws, so I didn't pay for it but am gleaning info from it. Maybe I should have the same mind set about info from the private sector, regardless of book/app. I guess I'll just have to go old-school and actually talk to people =]

    Quote Originally Posted by scope View Post
    Exactly correct. But I think we should drop the stealth as it infers going off trail to create a site.

    Most of the sites listed are those that have water, so my assumption is that you're willing to carry water to the non-listed site. If that's the case, you'll find plenty of these spots along the way. Not really stealth because they are created by the hordes that start thru hikes every year, so its not like you're creating off-trail sites. Lot of them aren't too far from water and most have makeshift fire rings, though I sort of loathe seeing these sites chopped up to create firewood, so if we're talking LNT, that's my biggest concern. I go without a fire these days as I don't sit around much in camp (hammock). I'd say you can't go 2 miles without seeing a good flat site for a tent, and can't go a mile without seeing a cleared site that has been used for a tent, even if not all that flat.

    But really, get a hammock and stop worrying about flat earth stuff.
    I am willing to carry water and dry-camp. I only make fire when car camping and don't like the idea of people chopping either. Hopefully, those that do build fire are using dead/downed wood, or is that against LNT?

    That last comment made me chuckle. I see hammocking in my near future. Currently, I'm using the MSR thru-hiker mesh 2 under a Warbonnet Cloudburst tarp. I haven't used it in the backcountry yet, but love the idea of the tarp. I can only imagine getting out on the AT and seeing the wealth of opportunities to hang being very alluring.
    Last edited by BAontheTrail; 06-05-2019 at 18:28.

  16. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BAontheTrail View Post
    BINGO! I could not agree more! I cannot get on board with paying for Guthook, even for the individual sections. The info it provides is probably amazing, but unless there's proof that the person profiting from apps like that is giving back to the trail, it's a no go for me. I should also say the AWOL guide i referenced in the OP is my father-in-laws, so I didn't pay for it but am gleaning info from it. Maybe I should have the same mind set about info from the private sector, regardless of book/app.
    Just did a little research and Atlas Guides, maker of Guthook app, does give back a little. This is from their site:

    "GIVING BACK: Pledge 1%

    1% for good. Atlas Guides is committed to helping support our community, our world, and our environment. This is why weíve pledged to follow the 1-1-1 model. As a company, we donate at least 1% of our product, our time, and our profits to causes and non-profit organizations that help make a difference."

    That amounts to $0.60 per $60 AT thru purchase, $0.30 per $30 PCT thru purchase, $0.15 per $15 JMT thru purchase, and $0.09 per $9 section purchases. Plus, 1% of their products and time (I wonder who is receiving the sections or thrus for FREE?!).

    They could choose to not give anything back. What do y'all think about all this?
    Last edited by BAontheTrail; 06-05-2019 at 18:43.

  17. #17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BAontheTrail View Post
    Just did a little research and Atlas Guides, maker of Guthook app, does give back a little. This is from their site:
    They could choose to not give anything back. What do y'all think about all this?
    I would say that's fair. It takes a whole lot of front end work to produce a guide like this and to keep it up to date. Once you buy it, you get up dates forever. The app store and Paypal take a cut too. I doubt he's getting rich doing this. It is a small niche market. I bet his hourly wage is pitiful.
    Follow slogoen on Instagram.

  18. #18
    13-45 Section Hiker Trash
    Join Date
    04-09-2008
    Location
    Lynchburg, VA
    Age
    47
    Posts
    1,080
    Images
    1

    Default

    As others have stated there are a decent amount of established camp spots in GA. One thing that no one mentioned is that camping outside of an established spot might be a little more tricky in GA than elsewhere on the AT as there is a significant amount of posion ivy that grows as ground cover in GA. It's been a while since I've hiked GA, but I remember seeing lots of it along most of the AT through GA. So just be careful and make sure you can identify poison ivy as you don't want to get up in any of that.
    AT: 2007-2019 (45 sections)
    JMT: 2013

  19. #19
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-28-2007
    Location
    Georgia and Hawaii
    Posts
    18,008

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Starchild View Post
    This is part of LNT, don't make campsites, find them (aka the best campsites are found, not made). By advising someone to use already established campsites you are advising them not to make their own. That's a LNT win.
    LNT Principles are guidelines that can be individually situationally applied. LNT Principles were never meant to be blindly followed.


    I don't create a CS where I sleep. That can be a mistake as you say.

    Exactly! Are you suggesting most ATers are 'finding' CS's? OR, is it more accurate to state ATers - humans - congregate at established CS's for their own comforts and conveniences irregardless of LNT Principles and for maintenance conveniences?
    Truth be told established CS's... especially on the AT.... are not indicative of LNT Principles. It's just the best overall LNT advisable approach offered to the larger public. People not adhering to LNT Principles at established CS's negates sleeping at established CS's as a LNT approach. What it does is concentrate the non LNT impacts to a higher degree to a smaller area because there are always LNT infractions occurring within larger and regular trail usage groups... particularly of somewhat dubious knowledge bases.

    Where humans congregate in significant numbers over regular patterned periods is not a LNT situation...no matter how much we like to pat ourselves on the back to feel environmentally "good" about ourselves. IMHO, education, including spouting off LNT education, is not the answer! Applied knowledge, applied LNT Principles, within a situational contextual awareness of a larger ecological whole is the ultimate goal. AND, it begins with each of us acting responsible of a larger whole. Two on WB that do more for LNT without dogmatically ranting about it are Another Kevin and Tipi Walter because they are willing to avoid high use trails like the AT conscientious of their personal impacts.

    FWIW, I don't require a non LNT picnic table, fire ring often disgusting with trash on the AT, bear cables, saw or axe, non LNT AT rodent trap/AT shelter, non LNT contaminated water, beaten down maintained single track with a white painted non LNT rectangular every 70 ft on avg, and unaturalized non LNT wildlife. These situations occur because it's where humans congregate often with more a camping rather than hiking approach to backpacking. It occurs because of a culture's desire to command and control the environment for humanity's comfort, convenience, and exploitation. It occurs within a society that has been engrained with the national self serving BELIEF of Manifest Destiny that now occurs globally. I don't require the socio-psychological safety net of sleeping or hiking with others en masse, a silny/DCF/etc "wall of separation" from the environment, or uber anal-yzed routine logistical conveniences over documented on so and so's highly touted self profiteering apps or guidebooks to behave in a LNT fashion either. Fundamentally at odds with LNT is the entrenched European based Abrahamic U.S. cultural notion humanity is separate and above the environment, NOT an integral part of it to which we belong. It leads to the cultural assumption the environment is something humanity owns, to be dominated, to be "developed" by humanity, and to be ruthlessly economically exploited. IMHO, coming full circle, it is because of these cultural tendencies, societal habits, and advise of apps we need LNT... BUT LNT IS STILL ONLY A BAND AID in this nation. It is a failed attempt overall at developing ecological awareness despite me acting as a LNT Educator. FWIW, I don't adhere to these beliefs! I hike with the mindset I'm part of Nature, the ecological system, but a strand in a greater interconnected web of life, AND with the idea I'm a light handed loving steward of Nature and the earth where my human behavior matters...hopefully and knowingly in a positive manner.

    I spend on avg 8-9 hrs in camp. "In camp" I'm sleeping 95 % of those hrs. I backpack to hike, to move, to adventure, to explore, to live LNT nomadically, not to primarily camp, not spending more of any 24 hr period stopped or 'in camp' establishing camping roots/feathering a camping nest of comforts and conveniences with a Manifest Destiny mindset. When I do stop I mostly stealthily LNT solo cowboy, bivy, and hang. That can be more a LNT situation than tenting with a larger footprint at an established CS. I hike 95% of the time solo conscientious of a larger whole. That creates less impact than hiking in a party. I carry less food/day, less garbage, etc. I go UL. I don't relegate hiking to problematic conditions or situations like during spring mud season or during high usage periods or beating one trail down over and over at the expense of ignoring a plethora of hiking opportunities in the U.S. and locally. All this contributes to having a lesser impact. These are LNT wins too since I'm not succumbing to the supposed conveniences and comforts of AT shelters...which maybe I'm deluded by is what motivates most hikers/campers to congregate at established CS's... NOT TO supposedly adhere to LNT. Most times I don't sleep at a water source either. I mostly dry camp. Most AT shelters are located at water sources. I always follow strong LNT principles.
    Last edited by Dogwood; 06-06-2019 at 14:52.

  20. #20
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-28-2007
    Location
    Georgia and Hawaii
    Posts
    18,008

    Default

    Absolutely HYOH BAonthe trail, which also entails being responsible for one's hike and behavior rather than doing yet another cookie cutter hike as someone else hiked.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •