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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tipi Walter View Post
    Cool subject. It concerns me of course due to how much decent food (calories and protein) a backpacker can carry long term.

    Google up "Ranger School" and you'll find an interesting article on Wikipedia with this wonderful quote---

    Physical effects
    Following the completion of Ranger School, a student will usually find himself "in the worst shape of his life".

    Military folk wisdom has it that Ranger School's physical toll is like years of natural aging; high levels of fight or flight stress hormones . . . . , along with standard sleep deprivation and continual physical strain, inhibit full physical and mental recovery throughout the course.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ranger_School

    This is was certainly true for me. I could not have passed the Ranger PT test if they gave it prior to graduation. RLTW
    76 HawkMtn w/Rangers
    13 HF>CramptonsG
    14 LHHT
    15 Girard/Quebec/LostTurkey/Saylor/Tuscarora/BlackForest
    16 Kennerdell/Cranberry-Otter/DollyS/WRim-NCT
    17 BearR
    18 NOBO AT halfway

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tipi Walter View Post
    Cool subject. It concerns me of course due to how much decent food (calories and protein) a backpacker can carry long term.

    Google up "Ranger School" and you'll find an interesting article on Wikipedia with this wonderful quote---

    Physical effects
    Following the completion of Ranger School, a student will usually find himself "in the worst shape of his life".

    Military folk wisdom has it that Ranger School's physical toll is like years of natural aging; high levels of fight or flight stress hormones . . . . , along with standard sleep deprivation and continual physical strain, inhibit full physical and mental recovery throughout the course.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ranger_School
    I just read david gogginsí book and he went through both navy seal and ranger school and he found the ranger school toughest due to calorie restrictions.

  3. #23
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    Athletes sometimes use IV therapy for recovery and even for performance enhancement. So I would imagine that IV nutrients like those (vitamins, minerals, amino acids, hormones) plus some IV glucose and breathing supplemental oxygen would likely raise the caloric digestive and respiratory limits of the human machine - to some degree. But at what expense? What would the negative effects be of increase workload on heart, kidneys, liver, etc. As a species we physiologically evolved to be able to perform at levels that provided some advantage of being able to survive long enough to procreate and raise the next generation. Athletic endurance was only part of the equation of those that are our biological ancestors. We are a compromise of the physiological and all the other traits of the most successful breeders. Athletic endurance at some of the extreme levels people are taking it to is a pretty recent phenomena in human history.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maineiac64 View Post
    I just read david goggins’ book and he went through both navy seal and ranger school and he found the ranger school toughest due to calorie restrictions.
    When I asked my son how Ranger School compared to our Sierra High Route hike, his answer surprised me. He said it was about the same physically but the difference was they could eat something like 2400 calories.
    enemy of unnecessary but innovative trail invention gadgetry

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maineiac64 View Post
    I just read david goggins’ book and he went through both navy seal and ranger school and he found the ranger school toughest due to calorie restrictions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Malto View Post
    When I asked my son how Ranger School compared to our Sierra High Route hike, his answer surprised me. He said it was about the same physically but the difference was they could eat something like 2400 calories.
    I've been restricting daily caloric load for more than 20 yrs as pre hike prep for similar motivations as SEAL and Ranger schooling. You learn to operate mentally and physically at a high level without the over consumption U.S. civies are accustomed. Same with sleep. This approach to backpacking assumes a decent level of fitness pre hike. It's not a hike yourself into LD hiking shape(psychologically, physically, emotionally, spiritually) approach. It fits into UL backpacking. Operating on a restricted daily caloric load correlates with less food wt. Consider this approach uses the restricted caloric load technique on soldiers already fit with little body fat to make up for energy making them fitter and able to withstand extremes of combat.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    ....... Consider this approach uses the restricted caloric load technique on soldiers already fit with little body fat to make up for energy making them fitter and able to withstand extremes of combat.
    Here is a link to the research article itself. https://advances.sciencemag.org/content/5/6/eaaw0341

    As I read it, what the scientists found basically is that if you expend energy in excess of 2.5 times your Rest Metabolic Rate then the deficit can't be made up from eating more food instead you lose body fat and muscle mass. So for soldiers undergoing intense training, restricting calories below 2.5 times their RMR really doesn't make them fitter. It just increases loss of body fat and muscle mass. It may psychologically prepare them for the hardships they may encounter.
    If you don't stand for something, you will fall for anything.

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