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Thread: Durston X-mid

  1. #1

    Default Durston X-mid

    Received mine about a week ago. Set it up in some classic New Zealand winter rain, after 30 hours not a drop got inside, my MLD Solomid XL leaked in similar conditions but I suspect that was due to poor factory seam sealing.

    Very excited about my X-mid, feels twice as big as my Tarptent Notch and MLD Solomid. The off-set poles change everything. Awesome design, easy to enter/exit, massive vestibules and only 4 stakes needed.

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Randy Watson View Post
    Received mine about a week ago. Set it up in some classic New Zealand winter rain, after 30 hours not a drop got inside, my MLD Solomid XL leaked in similar conditions but I suspect that was due to poor factory seam sealing.

    Very excited about my X-mid, feels twice as big as my Tarptent Notch and MLD Solomid. The off-set poles change everything. Awesome design, easy to enter/exit, massive vestibules and only 4 stakes needed.
    There has been about 20 pages of chat about this tent on trek-lite.com. I'm waiting for the 2P version of this tent to be released to buy...but very much looking forward to it. There have been a lot of good things said about it.

  3. #3

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    Yeah I found it by accident. I loved Skurka's design but was surprised when it came in at 2.5lbs, plus the useless extra space (9 inches all around the net tent) made no sense to me, and no vestibules. I considered getting it anyway due to the design but held off. What I love about this is that it's rectangular, and due to the angled inner tent it creates two giant, tall vestibules, and it's very easy to enter/exit. My Tarptent Notch in contrast was really frustrating to enter/exit with my bad back due to the door being in the middle, and having a pole in the way. On this design, the poles are completely out of the way - it's remarkable. Will be interesting to see the future versions of this shelter.

  4. #4
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    The only thing I see about this tent that looks questionable in the photos I've seen is how low it sits to the ground.
    Comparing it to the Notch, since you brought that up, the Notch seems to be WAY better ventilated than this X-mid.
    Is there a way to pitch it so the perimeter is two or three inches off the ground without messing up the way the inner tent sits?
    Or do you just leave the doors open a bit, even in the rain?

  5. #5
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    I'm rather late on this one, but you can adjust the height of the X-Mid fly. The cords at the 4 corners are adjustable, where longer cords will lift the fly higher for a few inch gap, or you can set them shorter to button it right down to fully stop drafts/blowing snow etc.

    Compared to the Notch, the X-Mid has far more functional peak vents because the dual vents are way larger and prop open with a strut, whereas the Notch vents are much smaller and don't have a strut, so they end up crinkled half shut after being packed. Typically they might flow about 20% as much air as the X-Mid vents. The X-Mid much better peak ventilation, which is the key thing since hot/moist air rises. You can make a tent really drafty around the bottom and still have humid air condensing in the top half.

    Around the bottom though, there was a generation of the Notch that had a higher cut to the bottom edge which did allow more airflow there, but this was widely complained about by users because it allows a lot of drafts and rain splatter, so TT has gone back to the older design of a full coverage fly that extends to near the ground like the X-Mid. The bottom edge of the X-Mid fly is more adjustable though, so you can pin it down more easily yet also raise it up higher more easily. Comparing current generations the X-Mid has better bottom ventilation and much better peak ventilation.

  6. #6

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    I need another tent like I need a root canal but I ordered the 1p. The price point is ridiculously attractive. I'm surprised more users here haven't chimed in about this tent.

  7. #7
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    I have ordered the x-mid 2p. one thing i'm worried about is that many people say that it has a large size when staked out. My family of 4-5 will be hiking in NY, CT, MA next summer, so I will need another tent to go along with this one (my old 3p backpacking tent that I've had forever just got stolen out of my yard when I was airing it out), and I have considered buying another of these x-mid tents or getting a freestanding or semi-freestanding like the tiger wall 3p (which is considerably more expensive). From those that have hiked in that area, do I need to worry about finding space for 2 tents, especially 2 x-mid 2p tents, or is that not as big of a deal as people make it out to be? Would having the x-mid and then a freestanding-ish tent be better space-wise? I'm really flying somewhat blind here, and since I have to buy 2 tents now, I can't really afford to make a mistake. Suggestions would be appreciated.

  8. #8
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
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    Really ,your tent got stolen out of your yard while set up to air out?that really sucks!! I cannot respond to questions about tent space up north. But I can suggest your local rei garage sales for tents. I'm actually looking to purchase the agnes tiger 2 person, forest bungalow myself. (yes expensive) !
    Last edited by JNI64; 08-12-2020 at 02:23.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by tracysibole View Post
    I have ordered the x-mid 2p. one thing i'm worried about is that many people say that it has a large size when staked out. My family of 4-5 will be hiking in NY, CT, MA next summer, so I will need another tent to go along with this one (my old 3p backpacking tent that I've had forever just got stolen out of my yard when I was airing it out), and I have considered buying another of these x-mid tents or getting a freestanding or semi-freestanding like the tiger wall 3p (which is considerably more expensive). From those that have hiked in that area, do I need to worry about finding space for 2 tents, especially 2 x-mid 2p tents, or is that not as big of a deal as people make it out to be? Would having the x-mid and then a freestanding-ish tent be better space-wise? I'm really flying somewhat blind here, and since I have to buy 2 tents now, I can't really afford to make a mistake. Suggestions would be appreciated.
    Have you looked at the Tarptent double rainbow?

    I've had the X-mid 1P out for a week in some wet conditions. I'll do a review soon.

  10. #10

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    This is a short review of my experiences with the X-mid. I stumbled across this tent on Drop and was intrigued by its features and price. As a dedicated trekking pole user, I own a Notch and am mostly happy with it but there are some quibbles with it which the X-mid addresses. For full specs, price and pics of the X- mid check out:

    https://drop.com/buy/massdrop-x-dan-durston-x-mid-1p-tent

    One of the quibbles addressed is packed size. The Notch, with itís longer profile, needs to ride vertically outside of my 40L pack. This is problematic on narrow, brushy trails in the SE where I frequently hike. The X-mid fits horizontally in my pack, no problem. Heres a side-by side packed size comparison.



    Due to time constrains, this will be short so here are some things I liked and things I felt could be improved.

    Pros:

    Fits in pack neatly
    Very easy setup
    Walls go to the ground but can be adjusted higher
    Large apex vents
    Stays taut when wet
    Plenty of vestibule space
    Excellent weather resistance
    Interior space is good and holds the largest single air pads with room to spare at the ends
    Interior removal is as easy as it gets thanks to snap buckles at apex
    Interior storage pocket location (love this)
    Price, price, and price.

    Cons:

    Included stakes
    Guylines at the four corners are too short, plan on replacing with slightly longer 2.5mm lines.
    Door ties. Disclaimer:I have been spoiled by the magnets


    Iím impressed by the X-mid. For the money, you get a very good tent and I would recommend it to anyone seeking a quality, low cost shelter for backcountry trips. Hereís a shot of it on my 5 night hike in Mt. Rogers NRA.













    Last edited by martinb; 09-15-2020 at 13:52.

  11. #11
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    Nice review.

    Latest drop version of xmid addresses your Cons (better stakes are included and 2.5mm guylines, not sure about length, but can be easily purchased).



    Quote Originally Posted by martinb View Post
    This is a short review of my experiences with the X-mid. I stumbled across this tent on Drop and was intrigued by its features and price. As a dedicated trekking pole user, I own a Notch and am mostly happy with it but there are some quibbles with it which the X-mid addresses. For full specs, price and pics of the X- mid check out:

    https://drop.com/buy/massdrop-x-dan-durston-x-mid-1p-tent

    One of the quibbles addressed is packed size. The Notch, with itís longer profile, needs to ride vertically outside of my 40L pack. This is problematic on narrow, brushy trails in the SE where I frequently hike. The X-mid fits horizontally in my pack, no problem. Heres a side-by side packed size comparison.



    Due to time constrains, this will be short so here are some things I liked and things I felt could be improved.

    Pros:

    Fits in pack neatly
    Very easy setup
    Walls go to the ground but can be adjusted higher
    Large apex vents
    Stays taut when wet
    Plenty of vestibule space
    Excellent weather resistance
    Interior space is good and holds the largest single air pads with room to spare at the ends
    Interior removal is as easy as it gets thanks to snap buckles at apex
    Interior storage pocket location (love this)
    Price, price, and price.

    Cons:

    Included stakes
    Guylines at the four corners are too short, plan on replacing with slightly longer 2.5mm lines.
    Door ties. Disclaimer:I have been spoiled by the magnets


    Iím impressed by the X-mid. For the money, you get a very good tent and I would recommend it to anyone seeking a quality, low cost shelter for backcountry trips. Hereís a shot of it on my 5 night hike in Mt. Rogers NRA.














  12. #12
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    I wish there was a Dyneema version.

  13. #13
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    Mee too

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk

  14. #14
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    When you say it fits largest inflatable pads, I assume you mean the long wide sizes that are usually 25" wide and 6.5 ft long?

  15. #15

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    I carried the X-mid 1p on a 550 mile section of the PCT this spring. I love this tent. It snowed on me four times and rained twice. Lots of wind.

    I used kite tyvek as a ground sheet that extends out the full width and length of the tent and added loops to the corners to stake it out with the tent. This worked out great in high winds. I staked out the ground sheet then the tent lines went on the existing stakes. This technique really eliminates any guessing on if the stakes are set right angle.

    When taking it down, I left the bug house installed, pulled the trekking poles, pulled the stakes and then grabbed it by the apex's and layed it out flat, one fold over then rolled it up. quick and easy and no issues with bug house lines getting tangled.

    Issue 1. The tungsten tip of my trekking pole was long enough to penetrate the top of the tent at one of the tent apex's -- The Apex has been patched, I placed some addition material between the pole and the apex to prevent this from happening again.

    Issue 2. I lost the tungsten tips of my trekking poles about 200 miles into the hike due to a long road walk, and the plastic tips were too big for the grommets. -- I need to plan a back if this happens again. Some sort of sleeve for the pole tips. Would love to see a thimble style grommet. that would allow for different size tips and also prevent the tips from going through the top. See issue 1.

    Issue 3. Wind performance was very good, IF I used the peak lines and IF I tied down the short end of the tent. I have added line and line locks to to the loops on these short sides. I staked the doors with long aluminum pegs. I never used the loops on the door sides of the tents. Rocks on top of the stakes were a must in the sandy soil or SoCal.

    Great tent!

  16. #16
    Registered User ldsailor's Avatar
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    Great tent the X-Mid. I used it on a short hike of the Arizona Trail this year. Then I spent six days hiking and camping in Zion NP and it did great. One night it was really windy and other tents were blowing down, but not mine. They have great customer service as well. I had a problem and Dan Durston himself took care of it immediately.

    I was told they are redesigning parts of the tent to make it stronger and those tents will be out in the fall. Most of the current X-Mid 1P's have sold out to date. Amazons doesn't have any and another reseller is marking up the $220 list price to $400 on Amazon.
    Trail Name - Slapshot
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  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Odd Man Out View Post
    When you say it fits largest inflatable pads, I assume you mean the long wide sizes that are usually 25" wide and 6.5 ft long?
    It fits my 25"x72" Exped 3-D with room to spare on each end.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by martinb View Post
    It fits my 25"x72" Exped 3-D with room to spare on each end.
    Thanks. The review above says it feels much bigger than a TT Notch (which I have). But the specs suggest they are about the same. I'm wondering if I should switch to an XMid. I'm happy with the Notch. I like the two trekking pole, easy 4 peg set up, side entry, two doors two large vestibules., But I'm attracted to the advantages of polyester fabric on the XMid without the cost and fragility of spectra fiber (shaving a few oz is not a priority for me). Getting a roomier interior would be another priority. If true, I would be more inclined to switch.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Odd Man Out View Post
    Thanks. The review above says it feels much bigger than a TT Notch (which I have). But the specs suggest they are about the same. I'm wondering if I should switch to an XMid. I'm happy with the Notch. I like the two trekking pole, easy 4 peg set up, side entry, two doors two large vestibules., But I'm attracted to the advantages of polyester fabric on the XMid without the cost and fragility of spectra fiber (shaving a few oz is not a priority for me). Getting a roomier interior would be another priority. If true, I would be more inclined to switch.
    I have the Notch Li. The X-Mid has more room, both interior and vestibule-wise. The fabric of the X-Mid stays taut through storms or condensation and the offset pole locations really help with enter/exit as well as just hanging out with the mesh door open. You want six pegs, two for staking out the door locations and four corners. I took the apex guylines off because the tent is pretty stable with six pegs in most conditions.

    When I'm looking for the lightest possible load I'll take the Notch but for everything else I'm using the X-Mid.

  20. #20
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    Thanks. I have a standard Notch so the two are about the same weight. For me it would be the extra room and fabric upgrade I am interested in. But it looks like they are backordered til fall.

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