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Thread: 2 Questions

  1. #1
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    I am heading to Georgia next weekend to hike the Georgia section. While I realize that a hammock is a fine choice, I don't have a ton of experience hanging in strong winds or severe storms and am thinking about taking a tent. Should I be greatly concerned about using a hammock in these types of weather?

    For the record, I plan on using my Ridgerunner hammock and a 12 foot CF tarp with doors...which leads into my second question.

    Do I need shock cord on the corner tie out points or can I run a hard line? I've heard people do it both ways.

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2

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    I would think if you have any experience using the hammock in the rain and are sure you can be warm enough in late March weather, you should be fine. I did see a guy get his sleeping bag completely soaked his second night out in a hammock at Hawk Mt shelter. 35 degree rain, didn't pitch his trap right. Never did see him again.

    Try not to camp in gaps, which can act like wind tunnels. Shelters and most tent sites are located in areas which are
    reasonably protected
    from the wind. Keep an eye on the forecast and plan accordingly. As if you have any choice in the matter

    Having a short piece of shock cord, say 12", on your tie out lines could help reduce sag when the tarp gets wet by being able to pull in some slack.
    The AT - It has it's ups and downs...

  3. #3

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    It sounds like your 12' CF tarp would do the job if pitched correctly especially since it has doors. With CF, you don't have to be very concerned with the tarp stretching when wet so the shock cord isn't really needed to keep the thing from sagging. With that said, I keep short lengths of shock cord on all my tie out points. I think it absorbs some of the stresses from gusty winds.

    I use a gathered end hammock and have a winter cover to replace the summer bug net for a bit of additional warmth. I don't know if the ridge runner has that option. Also, some use an under quilt protector or a wind sock for both protection and warmth. I haven't gone down that road yet. I figure, if you weigh the hammock, suspension, winter cover, top quilt, under quilt and either under quilt protector or wind sock, you are starting to look at some serious weight there. Of course, "cold weather camping" and "ultralight" are two concepts that are hard to put together.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jgillam View Post
    I am heading to Georgia next weekend to hike the Georgia section...
    How did the trip go?

    How's that CF tarp working out with the RR? CF tarps typically aren't very wide to begin with, then clearing the spreader bars means you can't bring a side all the way down to get a good wind block, even with doors. When you're in the woods so to speak, having a wind block shouldn't matter much. There's a few spots that look real inviting where it would.
    "I wonder if anyone else has an ear so tuned and sharpened as I have, to detect the music, not of the spheres, but of earth, subtleties of major and minor chord that the wind strikes upon the tree branches. Have you ever heard the earth breathe... ?"
    - Kate Chopin

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    Default

    come on in...the water is fine. No needs for a back up of any kind. any kind of line will hold it down.

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    Quote Originally Posted by scope View Post
    How did the trip go?

    How's that CF tarp working out with the RR? CF tarps typically aren't very wide to begin with, then clearing the spreader bars means you can't bring a side all the way down to get a good wind block, even with doors. When you're in the woods so to speak, having a wind block shouldn't matter much. There's a few spots that look real inviting where it would.
    Sorry for the delay in replying, I guess I forgot to come back to follow up on my post.

    The AT trip went well. The CF tarp (12' HG w/ doors) worked out well with the Ridgerunner.

    Over the 7 days, we experienced a nice varity of weather. We had one cold night (33 F). A quick evening thunderstorm with small hail followed by heavy fog. An evening of soaking rain and another mildly windy night. Other than that, the weather was perfect. Lol

    Because I was worried about what I preceived as minimal side coverage on the tarp on my new setup, I freaked out and ordered an UQ protector before I left. I don't think it was necessary but, it did trap a little extra heat and made me feel better.

    If I knew it was going to rain, I'd pitch the tarp low, to the point that the spreader bars were touching the tarp (mostly on the head end) and didn't have any issues with adequate coverage. I'd also attribute that partially to the fact that the bridge doesn't sag down nearly as much as a GE hammock does.

    Overall, I slept pretty well. Still not the utopian sleep that I'm looking for but, it was adequate. At home I roll around all night, in the Ridgerunner I was left to mostly sleep on my back or right side, neither is preferred. While I am still going back and forth between a tent and hammock, as each has their benefits, I will say that the folks who were setting up or taking down tents in the rain, looked miserable.

    If someone is reading this as they are trying to figure out what type of tarp would work with a Ridgerunner, I'd recommend the 12' model with doors. Ideally, 12.5' would be nice as it would get you past the split hammock straps and allow you to completely seal the top of the doors. I'd also recommend that you get a model with doors.

    Jeremiah

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    I used the RR with a pad and it was thick enough so that when I turned on my side, my knees touched the rigid hem of the hammock where it narrows. I gave it up and went back to my gathered end.

    About sleep, in particular about sleep at home, keep in mind that the hammock supports you technically better than any mattress at home. Doesn't make it necessarily better sleep, though, at least not at first. Part of that is your "sleep memory" that is a physical reaction to your body not being supported as well in your bed at home (where you sleep 95% of the time). When you get out in the hammock, your body has this memory and wants to move around. What I have learned is that you can make minor adjustments to minimally satisfy this "craving" and get on your side for a bit, or sort of in between in a figure-4, and then end up on your back again - which is the position where you're best supported. Eventually, those cravings of the body to roll around will subside some, and you'll enjoy your hammock sleep even more.
    "I wonder if anyone else has an ear so tuned and sharpened as I have, to detect the music, not of the spheres, but of earth, subtleties of major and minor chord that the wind strikes upon the tree branches. Have you ever heard the earth breathe... ?"
    - Kate Chopin

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    I use a little shock cord on each corner and then on the doors too. I have used it in higher winds (20-30mph) and the shock cord worked great. I criss-crossed my doors which gave a little more coverage from the rain.

  9. #9

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    I have stayed dry and comfy in high winds, snow and heavy (sometimes sideways) winds in my hammock. I also use hard lines (paracord) to tie down, same paracord I hang it with. Haven't had any problems yet.
    I do vary the length of the tie downs depending on weather. Wider open if nice, close in tight if less desirable weather.
    ./~Hi ho, hi ho, it's up the trail I go ./~

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    Quote Originally Posted by GaryM View Post
    I have stayed dry and comfy in high winds, snow and heavy (sometimes sideways) winds in my hammock. I also use hard lines (paracord) to tie down, same paracord I hang it with. Haven't had any problems yet.
    I do vary the length of the tie downs depending on weather. Wider open if nice, close in tight if less desirable weather.
    You do run the paracord through straps, right?!?
    "I wonder if anyone else has an ear so tuned and sharpened as I have, to detect the music, not of the spheres, but of earth, subtleties of major and minor chord that the wind strikes upon the tree branches. Have you ever heard the earth breathe... ?"
    - Kate Chopin

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