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  1. #1

    Default Laurel Creek Shelter

    Does anyone know what kind of songbird lives at the Laurel Creek Shelter that sings so incredibly loudly at 5:00 am?

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    Whippoorwill?

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    Quote Originally Posted by MtDoraDave View Post
    Does anyone know what kind of songbird lives at the Laurel Creek Shelter that sings so incredibly loudly at 5:00 am?
    this? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jIxfVSS_65o

  4. #4

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    It wasn't a whippoorwill, I'm familiar with their song. This one was much more melodious...and loud

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  6. #6

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    I work for the Audubon Society...

    If you could provide more details I will help identify the culprit

  7. #7

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    Its almost certainly not a white-throated sparrow. They breed in the boreal forest north of Pennsylvania

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by blue indian View Post
    I work for the Audubon Society...

    If you could provide more details I will help identify the culprit
    I don't remember the song, but it was more of a song than just a few notes. It was very loud, and it started at 5:00 am, where everywhere else I slept during that section, they (the birds) started at 5:30.

    I doubt that's enough information to identify it - my hope was that someone from that area of Virginia, or someone who has stayed at that shelter and is familiar with birds would have identified that particular one.

    I got there early in the day, so I had time to read the log book, and for weeks this bird was the topic of people's writings. Things like "No bears, no mice, but that damn bird..."

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by MtDoraDave View Post
    I don't remember the song, but it was more of a song than just a few notes. It was very loud, and it started at 5:00 am, where everywhere else I slept during that section, they (the birds) started at 5:30.

    I doubt that's enough information to identify it - my hope was that someone from that area of Virginia, or someone who has stayed at that shelter and is familiar with birds would have identified that particular one.

    I got there early in the day, so I had time to read the log book, and for weeks this bird was the topic of people's writings. Things like "No bears, no mice, but that damn bird..."

    Haha....thats interesting

    I would need more info for a positive ID......so the mystery continues!

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    Do you have mockingbird? One sits in a tree next to my home and sings all night.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

  11. #11

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    Mockingbird is Florida's state bird, so yes...but I've not heard a mockingbird sing like this bird.
    Maybe I'll post the question on the Facebook AT page. There seems to be a lot of people from that area on the page.

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    At 5:30 in the morning in the open and close by, many spring songbirds will sound loud. The early hour makes me wonder: American robin?

    Was the song unusual in any way? Whistle? Warble? Caroling? Mechanical-sounding? Rising? Dropping?

    Some other guess possibilities: ovenbird, eastern towhee, red-eyed vireo

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    Cornell University has a complete set of bird songs online and searchable. See: https://www.birds.cornell.edu/home/

    Click the link, enter (for example), "red-eyed vireo" and then click the microphone icon. You'll get to hear that species. Ditto all the others.

  14. #14

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    Brown Thrasher?
    "It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent that survives. It is the one that is most adaptable to change". Charles Darwin

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Roper View Post
    At 5:30 in the morning in the open and close by, many spring songbirds will sound loud. The early hour makes me wonder: American robin
    Occum's razor. This was my initial thought. The robin is often overlooked because it is so common. I live in town and most days the robin wakes me up before my alarm. I'm talking like 4:30 in the morning. We have one in our yard with an unusual song. Has a funny trill in it that fooled me into thinking it was a house finch or rose breasted grosbeak until I saw it singing.

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