Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    11-28-2010
    Location
    Montgomery, AL
    Posts
    143

    Default Footwear for September

    Im an east coaster whos accustomed to hiking in non-waterproof trail runners. Im planning a trip out to Colorado (Maroon Bells, Aspen area) this September and curious about footwear recommendations. As of now we will be going over several of the 12,000 ft passes. Not planning any off trail hikes or scrambled though.

    Question 1: waterproof or not?
    Question 2: boots or shoes?
    Question 3: yaktrax or micro spikes recommended?

    Thank you



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    06-02-2011
    Location
    Neptune Beach, Fl
    Age
    45
    Posts
    6,105

    Default

    Opinions are like A holes...everybody has one...so heres mine....
    Non WP trail runners and definitely not traction needed...


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  3. #3

    Default

    If you find some footwear that Really is waterproof,please let me know. Hipwaders don't count...

  4. #4
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-20-2013
    Location
    Upper East Side of Texas
    Age
    73
    Posts
    8,313

    Default

    A zillion YouTube videos of folks crossing Colorado on the CDT in trail runners should be proof enough.
    Wayne

  5. #5

    Default

    Take into account foot shapes and weight of the hikers and their gear and the trail topology.

    Many people stop their hike with plantar fascia yet do not connect the dots to the sole type and cushioning of their footwear...yet they blindly try to hike in what the current trend is.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Let me go

  6. #6
    Registered User colorado_rob's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-20-2012
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Age
    63
    Posts
    4,232
    Images
    3

    Default

    Basically, wear whatever you're used to (trail runners). Nothing remarkably different from the east with respect to footwear on the 4-pass loop. Easier terrain footwear-wise than hiking, say, on a lot of the AT.

    There are some spots where there is some talus and scree where a decent, solid sole is nice though. Not too much to warrant boots or anything silly like that. There are a couple of feet-wet creek crossings, maybe only one in September. "waterproof" boots/shoes would not help though. Too deep. If you want dry feet, just take shoes off, cross, put 'em back on. The crossing I refer to is in Fravert basin, about half way around the loop. It has a nice sandy bottom, no footwear required to cross.

    "Talus and scree" are nicely define in Pmags article here:

    https://pmags.com/talus-vs-scree-what-is-the-difference


    And agree, no extra traction, though believe it or not, there might be some old leftover snow on the northeast side of Trailrider pass, even in early September. Epic snow coverage in those parts this year. I'll be hiking it soon, and I'll report in on conditions.

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by colorado_rob View Post
    Basically, wear whatever you're used to (trail runners). Nothing remarkably different from the east with respect to footwear on the 4-pass loop. Easier terrain footwear-wise than hiking, say, on a lot of the AT.

    There are some spots where there is some talus and scree where a decent, solid sole is nice though. Not too much to warrant boots or anything silly like that. There are a couple of feet-wet creek crossings, maybe only one in September. "waterproof" boots/shoes would not help though. Too deep. If you want dry feet, just take shoes off, cross, put 'em back on. The crossing I refer to is in Fravert basin, about half way around the loop. It has a nice sandy bottom, no footwear required to cross.

    "Talus and scree" are nicely define in Pmags article here:

    https://pmags.com/talus-vs-scree-what-is-the-difference


    And agree, no extra traction, though believe it or not, there might be some old leftover snow on the northeast side of Trailrider pass, even in early September. Epic snow coverage in those parts this year. I'll be hiking it soon, and I'll report in on conditions.
    On talus and scree, I find the ease of foot placement using trail runners outweighs any extra support from boots. As always, YMMV.
    "It's fun to have fun, but you have to know how." ---Dr. Seuss

  8. #8
    Registered User colorado_rob's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-20-2012
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Age
    63
    Posts
    4,232
    Images
    3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Feral Bill View Post
    On talus and scree, I find the ease of foot placement using trail runners outweighs any extra support from boots. As always, YMMV.
    Agree. I only find "boots" useful when doing endless miles of Talus/Scree, and by "boots" I mean relatively light weight/low cut "boots". More like extra-stiff trail runners, Keen Targhees, in particular. And sure, we all have different feet, to be sure.

++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •