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Thread: Booties?

  1. #1
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    Default Booties?

    I'm no dog owner, nor intend to become one.
    But I'm curious if there would have been any help for a near-incident I saw during the last weekend hike.

    We hiked over our local highest mountain, which is basically a huge Karst plateau with peaks up into the 10,000ft range.
    Karst means, zero soil and vegetation and extremely rough tread, pointy and sharp edged stones and rocks for miles. Some patches of snow still present (and some glacier in the higher areas).
    We met a Tourist couple which had their dog with them.
    The dog had taped paws and was bleeding on all four.
    They had still many hours to go for the next alpine hut, and another half-day to hike down to the vally.

    The dog didn't look unhappy, but I pitied him and asked the guy if I could help them, if he maybe needed some more tape?
    He said no, looked somewhat unhappy and uncertain, but they headed on anyway.

    So now my question is, would there have been any way to help them?
    Tape or some makeshift booties?

  2. #2
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    This happens on occasion on the AT in the whites in NH particularly in the northern presidentials. Once the dogs paws start bleeding there is not a lot to be done except carry it down to a vet and let it heal for few days. Booties well work preventatively but the dogs typically need to be trained to use them otherwise they will tear them off as soon as possible. I have heard folks who train them by putting the booties on before feeding the dog but many dogs really do not like them as it takes away their claws that are needed to climb up rocks. Even trained dogs will go through multiple pairs on a given day. I have seen emergency wrap jobs using fabric and duct tape. The dog is already in pain and usually will refuse to move even with the wrap as they have an open wound on the bottom of their feet. Some owners push their dog into going on and depending on its temperament it may keep going to be with their owner. Most animals do not like to show pain.


    I have heard unvalidated claims that soaking a dogs feet in strong tea prior to hike will toughen up the pads but can not envision how an owner would accomplish this task.

  3. #3
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    I don't like them and he don't like them. Note the tail between the legs as a indicator of his disapproval. img_0602_8314677855_o.jpg
    Everyone has a photographic memory. Not everyone has film.

  4. #4
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    OK thanks, so there was nothing I could have done for them anyway.
    The guy was ready to carry the dog (and he actually did part of the way), but the size and weight was just too much to carry it the whole way. All total it was a two full days Karst hike for the party.

    Actually I was very tempted to express my dislike to what he was doing to his dog, but kept my mouth shut as I honestly know nothing about this topic.

  5. #5
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    We love our doggies. Injuries can happen to a pet on a day hike, just due to some human crashing glass bottles near by and their little toes just get horribly sliced. But dog owners should review animal first aid to recognize hypothermia, shock ... and know what to do where ever their precious companion goes. Just like for us humans, there are DIY slings and harnesses to create for lifting or carrying pets in the woods. Effort still has to be exerted but if methodology is reviewed for a just in case, using standard stuff in your backpack - the animal can go on the sling in the front or rearrange your bpack and it goes between your back and your pack. This is experience sharing. Doggie was 49 pounds and really wounded. Front sling with human arms- 2.5 miles. Years ago, we left a sick pet owner on the trail-3 or so miles to their car . I wont forget it. Now - I would have helped construct a litter. It reminds me of the drills you put yourself thru when you first go long distance with little kids. You always think what if the kids get hurt. Well did you plan that maybe your other adult would. I guess over think it before you go - plan B?

  6. #6
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    Yes they work but donít last long on shale! Found out recently in Co.


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  7. #7

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    My dog wore them on 1 trip. They made his feet smell terrible because the foot gets wet and then is stuck in this nylon sock. As well it wore the hair off his feet in contact locations and gave him some inury on the dew claws. My vote is no on the dog booties, if the dog can not naturally complete the goal then the goal needs to be modified.
    AT Shuttle List
    Trail Miles: 3,715.9
    AT Trips: 67
    AT Map 1 Completion: 1818.9 Springer, GA - Franconia Notch, NH
    AT Map 2 Completion: 263.8 Gaps From GA - PA

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gambit McCrae View Post
    My dog wore them on 1 trip. They made his feet smell terrible because the foot gets wet and then is stuck in this nylon sock. As well it wore the hair off his feet in contact locations and gave him some inury on the dew claws. My vote is no on the dog booties, if the dog can not naturally complete the goal then the goal needs to be modified.
    Assume your talking about the booties that have soles like boots/shoes? The ones I used are from dogbooties.com made in AK for sled/working dogs. Basically 1000 D nylon like backpack material more of a sock than boot. Made to be disposable as only $3.00 each. Definitely helped and my pup didnít mind at all wearing them. Next trip out west will bring extra as donít last long.


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  9. #9

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    Yes those look much better then what I used.

    Photo: Trip 21 Wayah bald to Deep Gap
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    AT Shuttle List
    Trail Miles: 3,715.9
    AT Trips: 67
    AT Map 1 Completion: 1818.9 Springer, GA - Franconia Notch, NH
    AT Map 2 Completion: 263.8 Gaps From GA - PA

  10. #10
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    An item that might be in your first aid kit might be good to use on a pets foot when it's bleeding. Carry some Dermabond advanced topical skin adhesive.

    https://www.jnjmedicaldevices.com/en...-skin-adhesive

    Care must be taken when using on animals. Paws must be imobilized for a few minuites till the product dries. Paw can be covered with bootie to prevent dog from licking wound.

    Medical cyanoacrylate adhesives ó also called skin glue or surgical glue ó are less toxic than the version you keep in your tool box. They also have plasticizers to make them more flexible.

    When to use it

    The most recommended use for medically approved cyanoacrylate adhesive is to close the two sides of clean minor cuts.

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