Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 21 to 29 of 29
  1. #21
    Registered User
    Join Date
    11-01-2014
    Location
    Norwell, MA
    Age
    57
    Posts
    2,203

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Arden View Post
    . . . That is, unless the prices are significantly higher than at Amazon. Of course, I could try them out in the store, and buy them on Amazon, but I don't like doing that.
    Yeah, as long as you don't want a local outdoor store in your area, go ahead and buy on Amazon.

    Personally, I happily pay whatever reasonably fair price my local outdoor store charges for things in preference to saving a few percent via mail-order, because frankly, I like having the local outdoor store as part of my community and for their expertise and for my convenience.

    By the way, I'm not rich. I'd just rather save real money in the long run and a few percent on a questionable first purchase. I'd rather buy fewer things at slightly higher prices that are what I want and need and/or are conveniently returnable, instead of saving a few percent on an initial purchase and then buying multiples until I find what I like. . . oh, like the OP is struggling with.
    I'm not lost. I'm exploring.

  2. #22
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-26-2010
    Location
    Northern NJ
    Posts
    363
    Journal Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Christoph View Post
    Believe it or not, I used a set of Walmart poles on my thru and that's all I use now. They are worn to the nub but I bought another set and they're still going, between both sets about 3800 AT miles. I'm 6'2" and around 218.
    I wonder who makes those poles for Walmart. I suppose that they will buy them from whoever gives the best deal. Might be worth looking into for a spare pair - in case I hike with a friend or family member who doesn't own, or who has forgotten their poles. Or, leave them in the car for those times when you arrive at the trailhead and suddenly realize you left your poles at home.
    Of course, there are always suitable sticks available. Sometimes I find some pretty good ones at trailheads.

  3. #23
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-01-2016
    Location
    Chattanooga, Tennessee
    Posts
    804

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Arden View Post
    I wonder who makes those poles for Walmart. I suppose that they will buy them from whoever gives the best deal.
    From what I read, the latter is definitely the case. But I don't think it's one of those deals where a well-known maker has some private label business. I think those walmart poles are pretty heavy and in other ways not likely to have been a design by a familiar name.

    For some years, it was often rumored that Gregory made LL Bean's packs. Perhaps this was because (at least at the time) Gregory made packs of similar quality and materials ... namely, solid, but arguably "overbuilt". I could never confirm this - I didn't find a model that was almost identical except for the logo.

    Last year, I bought a "hunter's" daypack from LL Bean. It's a nice pack, well-made, interesting design (soft, quiet fabric, blaze orange), and so forth. Digging around the web for similar blaze orange packs (since sometimes I hike through hunting areas in season) I found a wholesaler from China that sold large batches of packs that looked identical in design to the Bean pack, save for the logo. [the wholesale price was stunningly low compared to the ultimate retail price, but then again you had to buy 1000 or more of them at a time, or something like that.] Point is, this appeared to be a private label arrangement of a high quality item, but even then it wasn't a brand name behind it, at least not one that would be recognized by most Americans. So the Walmart poles - I don't know who makes them but I would bet that it's some Chinese company you've never heard of.

  4. #24

    Default

    ski poles!

  5. #25
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-26-2010
    Location
    Northern NJ
    Posts
    363
    Journal Entries
    1

    Default

    I received my new BD Ergo Cork poles today. They look really great, and seems like the locking mechanism will hold up really well. I'll probably do a day hike on Wed or Thurs this week so I'll get a chance to check them out.
    Now, I've been thinking (perhaps over-thinking) about the adjustment of any hiking pole. Is there any advantage to adjusting the upper section to be longer than the lower, or v/v?
    My thinking is that if anything, you would want the lower section - which is smaller in diameter - to be the shorter of the two, since I would expect the pole to be a bit stronger in this configuration. But most likely, the poles are designed to carry their maximum rated weight regardless of the length of each section (so long as you don't extend past the stop mark).
    One website I visited suggested that you extend the lower section to its max, then adjust the upper section as needed. This way, it is easier to re-adjust 'on the fly' as needed.
    In the past, I usually tried to adjust each section to the same point, using the cm markers. That way, once I know how long I want the pole, it's easy to set it up.

    Edit: Watched another video. She recommends adjusting the sections proportionately to balance the stress on the joints/sections.
    Last edited by Arden; 10-22-2019 at 19:29.

  6. #26
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-26-2010
    Location
    Northern NJ
    Posts
    363
    Journal Entries
    1

    Default

    Did a 9 mile hike in Harriman with my new BD poles on Thursday. Love them! Really helps save my knees, even on the mild ascents and descents in the park.

  7. #27
    Registered User
    Join Date
    11-01-2014
    Location
    Norwell, MA
    Age
    57
    Posts
    2,203

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Arden View Post
    Did a 9 mile hike in Harriman with my new BD poles on Thursday. Love them! Really helps save my knees, even on the mild ascents and descents in the park.
    Yeah, trekking poles rock!
    I'm not lost. I'm exploring.

  8. #28

    Default

    I like the UL carbon fiber poles that Gossamer Gear sells. I use the fixed length ones most of the time, and the sectioned ones for air travel trips.
    Find the LIGHT STUFF at QiWiz.net

    The lightest cathole trowels, wood burning stoves, windscreens, spatulas,
    cooking options, titanium and aluminum pots, and buck saws on the planet



  9. #29
    Registered User IslandPete's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-08-2017
    Location
    Tilloo Cay, Abaco, Bahamas
    Posts
    118

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Arden View Post
    Did a 9 mile hike in Harriman with my new BD poles on Thursday. Love them! Really helps save my knees, even on the mild ascents and descents in the park.
    You’re welcome!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
++ New Posts ++

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •