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  1. #1
    Registered User Dad's Avatar
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    Default Scratch and Dent

    I finished at Katahdin early September 2018 and when I got home it took many months for my injuries from briars and prickly bushes to heal. Legs and arms covered with scratches and punctures. My exercise around home was on well established trails and some were even paved. Until about a month ago that is, when I got back out into the less established trails and even some bushwhacking. Same thing again. I'm covered with the same injuries and they seem to be taking forever to heal over. I get scabs and they come off but the underlying injury is not healed and this repeats and looks to be next spring before they are gone. Question - is this normal or is it likely that I am having some sort of allergy to the shrubs etc. Also, I'm 70 so I guess it could be just getting old and slower to heal up. Anybody experience this or have some insight about it? Thanks. Trailname = CBiscuit

  2. #2

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    Have you been tested for diabetes?

  3. #3
    Registered User Dad's Avatar
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    Don't think so. What symptoms should I look for and what makes you ask. I have a Dr appointment soon and can ask then. Tell me more.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dad View Post
    Don't think so. What symptoms should I look for and what makes you ask. I have a Dr appointment soon and can ask then. Tell me more.
    Diabetics have a hard time healing. Specifically the feet have to be watched due to neuropathy- loss of feeling in extremities- diabetics don't feel things like blisters.

    Skin thins in people as they age, making them more susceptible to minor scratches and scrapes that don't heal well.

    You may not be healing well because you are scratching at night. Also, diet plays a big role in skin health and healing. As we age we can develop allergies to food "substances" that we tolerated before. There is so much crap in what passes for food these days that can cause skin irritations. And most doctors will downplay that possibility. But when you remove these things you will be surprised by the things that suddenly disappear!

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  5. #5

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    There maybe an underlying reason your healing so slowly. Hopefully your doctor will have some ideas.

    But I got to wonder why you don't wear long pants and long sleeve shirts to prevent being cut up? I always wear long pants to protect my legs. It's got to be 100 degrees out before I reluctantly go to shorts and then only if the trail is not overgrown. I know a lot of hikers think they have to wear shorts no matter what the weather or the trail conditions, which is just silly.
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  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dad View Post
    I finished at Katahdin early September 2018 and when I got home it took many months for my injuries from briars and prickly bushes to heal. Legs and arms covered with scratches and punctures. My exercise around home was on well established trails and some were even paved. Until about a month ago that is, when I got back out into the less established trails and even some bushwhacking. Same thing again. I'm covered with the same injuries and they seem to be taking forever to heal over. I get scabs and they come off but the underlying injury is not healed and this repeats and looks to be next spring before they are gone. Question - is this normal or is it likely that I am having some sort of allergy to the shrubs etc. Also, I'm 70 so I guess it could be just getting old and slower to heal up. Anybody experience this or have some insight about it? Thanks. Trailname = CBiscuit
    Cardinal signs of diabetes (high blood sugar) are: (1) increase thirst (2) increase hunger (3) increase urination. Other signs are weight loss or gain (in type II diabetes), blurry vision, headaches, change in mood (irritation) among others. Fasting blood sugar is usually the gold standard to diagnose diabetes. Also, you could ask your doctor for a simple blood test known as CBC or Complete Blood Count. They simply take a few cc's and check the blood portion (not the plasma) for red blood cells, platelets, and white blood cells. Then there's thinning of your skin, which is part of the natural aging process. A healthy, well balanced, and protein rich diet may help in healing of your skin and keep it healthy. Finally, consider vitamins/minerals supplements, but get them from a reliable source. There's a lot shenanigans in this area

  7. #7
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    Default

    The older I get, the longer simple stuff takes to heal. Who am I kidding? The longer any stuff takes to heal.

    I am not diabetic, but I do have to watch my diet to keep from becoming diabetic.

  8. #8

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    Slo-go'en has the solution in my opinion---wear pants. It's a minor concession when the overall goal is to get out there and hike.

  9. #9
    Registered User Dad's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tipi Walter View Post
    Slo-go'en has the solution in my opinion---wear pants. It's a minor concession when the overall goal is to get out there and hike.
    That's probably what I need to do. I remember as summer approached the trail was grown over about the same time it got really hot so I zipped off the lower legs. Also, in the northern states as you are around tree line the scrub growth encroaches on the trail and can really cut up your lower legs. Still probably get some scratches but hopefully it will be better.

  10. #10

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    Thread reminds me of my backpacking buddy Patman who posted this pic after one of our typical TN mountain backpacks---in hell thickets and bramble walls---


  11. #11

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    Oh and btw boys---don't wear shorts when you're postholing thru 2-3 feet of snow---like the idiot I am did one winter day back in 2010.

    Snow/ice crystals abrade the legs and causes a bicycle-like road rash---painful---


  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tipi Walter View Post
    Slo-go'en has the solution in my opinion---wear pants. It's a minor concession when the overall goal is to get out there and hike.
    Completely agree. Long pants will also protect you from ticks and all kind of insect bites, especially treated with permethrin.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by stephanD View Post
    Completely agree. Long pants will also protect you from ticks and all kind of insect bites, especially treated with permethrin.
    This! Long-sleeved shirts, too!


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