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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by SkeeterPee View Post
    Tipi, you are often hiking in shorts and leggings. Are these the merlino wool ones you mention here? are they light weight, med weight? if its cold raining is it better to be in wool leggings or running tights?
    My standard leggings are Icebreaker merinos at 260 wt---fairly heavy wt. See pic. This is my standard cold weather bottoms---shorts over leggings. Or just shorts and bare legs.

    In a cold rain there's no way I'll be using my merino leggings in any capacity except for in-camp living and sleeping. They stay dry at all costs. Instead I'll either hike in shorts or my rain pants over my bare legs to keep me warm---and I often put the shorts over the rain pants so I'll have pockets for various on-trail items. See bottom pic---me on left.

    TRIP 153 228-XL.jpg

    Trip 187 (231)-XL.jpg

    In a cold rain there are a few items which are allowed to get soaking wet---my boots/socks, my shorts, my rainpants/rain jacket---and minimal baselayers underneath the rain jacket. In camp all these items are striped off and replaced with dry layers including merino leggings.

    In the morning all the wet stuff is put back on so nothing ever gets "more wet" as the trip continues. The wet stuff gets "walked dry" eventually. Minimal torso baselayers under the rain jacket are a long sleeve silk top and a poly t-shirt over the silk---for a cold rain. The GTX jacket supplies the necessary core heat. In real cold with no rain alot more torso layers can be worn under the rain jacket---and pace slowed to prevent sweating.

  2. #22
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    Tipi:

    what's the hooded fleece you're wearing (at least looks like it's hooded in the pic)
    in the top pic?

    TIA

    Quote Originally Posted by Tipi Walter View Post
    My standard leggings are Icebreaker merinos at 260 wt---fairly heavy wt. See pic. This is my standard cold weather bottoms---shorts over leggings. Or just shorts and bare legs.

    In a cold rain there's no way I'll be using my merino leggings in any capacity except for in-camp living and sleeping. They stay dry at all costs. Instead I'll either hike in shorts or my rain pants over my bare legs to keep me warm---and I often put the shorts over the rain pants so I'll have pockets for various on-trail items. See bottom pic---me on left.

    TRIP 153 228-XL.jpg

    Trip 187 (231)-XL.jpg

    In a cold rain there are a few items which are allowed to get soaking wet---my boots/socks, my shorts, my rainpants/rain jacket---and minimal baselayers underneath the rain jacket. In camp all these items are striped off and replaced with dry layers including merino leggings.

    In the morning all the wet stuff is put back on so nothing ever gets "more wet" as the trip continues. The wet stuff gets "walked dry" eventually. Minimal torso baselayers under the rain jacket are a long sleeve silk top and a poly t-shirt over the silk---for a cold rain. The GTX jacket supplies the necessary core heat. In real cold with no rain alot more torso layers can be worn under the rain jacket---and pace slowed to prevent sweating.

  3. #23
    Clueless Weekender Another Kevin's Avatar
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    My personal practice: if there's any reasonable chance of having ice about, I'm bringing my Hillsound spikes. Ice and I do not get along.
    I always know where I am. I'm right here.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Traveler View Post
    Funny, they look like mountains to me, though agreed it's not technical climbing which far more equipment than Microspikes would be needed. The advice "You'll get off the trail during major winter storms" is fine and good if you are aware of impending storms and have the time and inclination to get off the trail. But notification of weather isn't always possible when hiking long distances, never mind reaching a town in hopes of finding shelter. What happens if you are caught in one of these storms and have to walk out for shelter on ice covered trails and are not able to stay on your feet? In those conditions, and this happen to lots of people every year, the weight savings becomes inconsequential.

    Taking a slip and fall on a steep trail with rocks hidden by snow can be a minor incident or bone breaking and potentially lethal depending on conditions that only saves about 12-ounces for Microspikes. For what it's worth because I hike alone most of the time, I have a relatively low risk threshold when it comes to this kind of thing and would suggest traction is similar to warmth in terms of safety, being prepared for both will always add weight until seasonal changes make it clear the need for traction and heavier clothing has passed. It really comes down to risk tolerance and assessment of consequences resulting from failure. An added consideration for me is the embarrassment and potential costs in some places of summoning SAR due to not being prepared for seasonal weather and conditions.
    + another vote for you taking your micro spikes. Leaving that early and the warm winter we're having very likely you'll have rain then refreezing at night. Which means ice,ice, baby. I love my khatlooa micro spikes very easy to slip on and off. And amazing the grip on ice and confidence they give, I've never slipped once on ice using them.

  5. #25
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    leaving for Springer on Sunday. I've decided to ship my microspikes to Fontana Dam, and carry my pair of yaktrax from the start just in case. They are much lighter. Not sure how long to keep the microspikes after the smokies.

  6. #26

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    The long range forecast I saw says continued above average temps for the southeast. Looks like the midwest and PA is about as far south as the really cold air is going to get, all due to a high presure system off the coast which is not moving.

    The down side is this high is pumping lots of moisture out of the gulf into the southern Appalachians, so except a lot of rain.
    The AT - It has it's ups and downs...

  7. #27
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    When, not if, you fall, youíll always hit a part with the least amount of cushion. I wiped out pretty bad a couple of years ago and havenít cared about the extra weight since. Plus the extra weight is a good workout and prep for NH.

  8. #28
    Clueless Weekender Another Kevin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slo-go'en View Post
    The long range forecast I saw says continued above average temps for the southeast. Looks like the midwest and PA is about as far south as the really cold air is going to get, all due to a high presure system off the coast which is not moving.
    The down side is this high is pumping lots of moisture out of the gulf into the southern Appalachians, so except a lot of rain.
    That's this week, of course. Beyond Neels Gap (maybe a bit farther if the person is fast), I have no idea what the person will be walking into. If it were me, I'd bring spikes. Above-average temps bring ice rather than snow. But you and I are accustomed to hiking in the Great White North. (Well, not really, but it sure looks that way by Georgia standards!)

    And take the forecast with a grain of salt. Mountains make their own weather.
    I always know where I am. I'm right here.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Praha4 View Post
    Tipi:

    what's the hooded fleece you're wearing (at least looks like it's hooded in the pic)
    in the top pic?

    TIA
    Sorry for the delay. The hooded thing is a Patagonia capilene thermal weight hoody.

  10. #30
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    Thanks, I think I'm going to have to give it a try.

    Had a Patagonia R1 Zip-neck hoody a while back, somewhere along the line I parted with it...sometimes regret letting it get away

    Quote Originally Posted by Tipi Walter View Post
    Sorry for the delay. The hooded thing is a Patagonia capilene thermal weight hoody.

  11. #31
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    Well, here's hoping he brought those spikes if the trail stays icy - http://www.highonleconte.com/daily-posts


  12. #32

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    On my last trip I was in eyeshot of Gregory Bald and Mt LeConte in the Smokies and really needed my microspikes on the BMT coming off a 5,000 foot mountain down to a gap at 3,000 feet. I carried them for 21 days and only used them for 2 days but when you need them you really need them. Here's the spikes on my zamberlan boots. They work best at low temps like 15F with powder dry snow---and NOT in wet snow.


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