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  1. #1
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    Default What canister mix has best cold weather performance with BRS?

    Been stove less for a while but want to try out BRS stove I recently bought for winter bartram trail hike. Other than keeping canister insulated Inside pack, sleeping bag etc what other cold weather hacks help with performance.


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  2. #2

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    For the mix, msr (what I mostly use) and snow peak have worked well for me a bit under freezing. If you grab fuel in a pinch, avoid primus/coleman
    Would be interested if others have other cold weather hacks! If it's well below freezing, I switch to my windpro inverted canister stove

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    Not sure how cold you are camping, but I keep the tank on an inside jacket pocket to warm it up before using. also just putting warm hands around it increase the gas flow. This seems to work down into the 20's. I have thought a water bath around the tank would probably help, but have not tried that.

  4. #4

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    You could try one adding a chemical toe warmers to the insulated bag you have the canister in.

  5. #5
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    Moulder strip.

    thom

  6. #6

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    You can see the details of the Moulder strip on a number of threads at backpackinglight.com, but it is basically a piece of copper whose top is in the edge of the flame, and whose bottom is in contact with the gas canister. I've used just a thick piece of copper electrical wire instead of the more common copper strip because I could just go to the hardware store and purchase a 1 foot piece for practically nothing. A Moulder strip in reasonable contact with the gas canister can keep me going well down to at least -10 or -15 F. It probably still works below that, but at those temperatures I'd rather not be out to see.
    Renais
    Trail name Catnapper

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  8. #8
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by renais View Post
    You can see the details of the Moulder strip on a number of threads at backpackinglight.com, but it is basically a piece of copper whose top is in the edge of the flame, and whose bottom is in contact with the gas canister. I've used just a thick piece of copper electrical wire instead of the more common copper strip because I could just go to the hardware store and purchase a 1 foot piece for practically nothing. A Moulder strip in reasonable contact with the gas canister can keep me going well down to at least -10 or -15 F. It probably still works below that, but at those temperatures I'd rather not be out to see.
    Renais
    Yeah, my preferred method as well keep it simple. I also use alcohol down to these temps and beyond thanks to ole shug

  9. #9

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    The problem with alcohol is energy density. It's fine for heating up a cup of coffee, but if you're melting snow you quickly cross over the point where it makes sense to carry it. Too much fuel required because it's half the energy by weight compared to liquid or canister fuels.

  10. #10
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
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    Yep, I go both ways and don't take that the wrong way we're talking stoves. I made a alcohol stove out of a tomato paste can fancy feast can and carbon felt burns for about 45 minutes melts snow nice.

  11. #11

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    Very nice. I do like the idea of alcohol stoves in general, especially for solo use. If I felt like cooking more often I'd probably use one quite a bit. These days I usually just keep it simple and don't carry a stove at all outside of the winter.

  12. #12
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    The BRS works great with the Moulder strip and even if not so cold it's required, it still helps maintain consistent flame whenever it's cold.
    Also, the BRS is super wind-sensitive, so some kind of shield from the wind is extremely helpful.

    20170124_072506.jpg

    If you look really closely, you can see my copper strip at the back left of the burner in the above picture and, of course, the windscreen that both allows room for the copper strip to pass through it and also shields the canister from the burner heat.

    Also note, the dusting of snow on the ice in the cup, so a before-breakfast morning picture. :-) This image was taken at the edge of a shelter in the Adirondack High Peaks area a couple Januarys ago.
    I'm not lost. I'm exploring.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by CalebJ View Post
    Here's some fun moulder strip reading:
    https://backpackinglight.com/forums/...se-at-21f-29c/
    Best advice for cold weather, use the Moulder Strip. Use windscreen 3/4 ways around stove/pot

  14. #14
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    Damn....after reading that -21!!!! F that! Iím only talking winter in southeast....I think the MSR canister would be fine alone..Iím talking 20*+.....I had a bad experience several years ago using a litemax with a partial canister...canít recall brand....around freezing wouldnít stay lit but think lot had to do with mix and partial canister...Moulder strip looks interesting.....Iíll likely cook Inside duomid do wind shouldnt be an issue if so Iíll just use a ccf pad already carry as e wind screen...thx all...

    Zelf I do love my energy drink (venom)stove but donít like alchy with dogs I case of spill etc...

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    Default

    Snowpeak as mentioned has the best mix.

  16. #16

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    IMHO, some brands may start out with good low temp performance but let the tank run down to less than a 1/3 and the performance at cold temps goes south with any brand fuel. The light easy to vaporize ingredients in the mix boil off faster and that means what is left is hard to vaporize. Someone with a heat shield and reasonable stove technique can get 14 days at 2 meals per day. Most folks resupply every 4 to 5 days so some just ditch the canisters half full in a hiker box (or trash) and then they dont worry as much about performance at low canister levels. The folks that are on tight budget that run their cans out or live off of half full cans found in hikers boxes usually figure out the tricks to get low temp performance or run alcohol and deal with its limitations.

  17. #17

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    are the Jetboil cans any good?

  18. #18
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by trailmercury View Post
    are the Jetboil cans any good?
    They've never let me down

  19. #19

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    Make sure the canister mix just has propane and isobutane, NO BUTANE. I don't think any brand that that meets this requirement is better than another. If your mix contains butane, in winter after the propane and isobutane have burned off, your flame will burn out due to the high vapor temp of butane. Even with no butane, if it's cold enough you will need to keep canister warm somehow. Options include a bowl of water to put canister into, the famous Moulder copper strip method , or a hot pack under the canister.
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  20. #20

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    What ever happened to the reusable heating pads? Primus used to sell them as an accessory. Little flexible plastic bubble shaped to fit in the concave under the canister. Bend the metal disc to activate it, and when it had been used you could toss it back in boiling water to recharge it.

    Edit - they must have been off the market for quite some time...
    https://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/sho...ting-pads-quot


    The red ones in this Amazon listing are basically what Primus made.
    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004CV2YXE/
    Last edited by CalebJ; 12-05-2019 at 16:48.

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