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  1. #1
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    Default Best hiking shoes for gout

    My boyfriend and I are embarking on our first thruhike of the AT in March and he was recently diagnosed with gout and pretty advanced arthritis in his one big toe. His doctor recommended Vasque hiking boots in Summit and Eriksson. Both are discontinued. They have a stiff shank/plate in the sole so not to bend your foot too much to spark any painful flare ups. Anyone know of any other hiking shoes (not necessarily boots) that may have this stiff shank/plate in the sole? The clock is ticking! Thanks.

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    Registered User The Old Chief's Avatar
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    I have gout in my right big toe and the best thing I've ever done for hiking purposes is take Allopurinol daily. Maybe go to one of those Good Feet stores and see if they make a stiff insert that can be used in just about any shoe.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LShuman024 View Post
    My boyfriend and I are embarking on our first thruhike of the AT in March and he was recently diagnosed with gout and pretty advanced arthritis in his one big toe. His doctor recommended Vasque hiking boots in Summit and Eriksson. Both are discontinued. They have a stiff shank/plate in the sole so not to bend your foot too much to spark any painful flare ups. Anyone know of any other hiking shoes (not necessarily boots) that may have this stiff shank/plate in the sole? The clock is ticking! Thanks.
    I remember watching early riser last year hike the AT on YouTube and switched to some kind of trail runner with a rock plate, can't remember what he switched to. Maybe somebody else remembers. But I know they make the trail runner type shoes with rock plate soles. I think he was 50 ish. Former military. May you could YouTube "early riser" hiking the AT then skip ahead to when he gets to pa. Where he switched to the rock plate soles shoes?

  4. #4
    Registered User kestral's Avatar
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    Found these insoles with metal rock plate.

    https://www.healthyfeetstore.com/turf-toe-full-steel-insole.html?cmp=googleproducts&kw=turf-toe-full-steel-insole&Color=Standard&Size=8%20-%20Women&gclid=CjwKCAiAsIDxBRAsEiwAV76N8-syU6b9QBNiD8FQu4uvxJ1lUMR069wOtsClcjyKy4a9-OPsIEjQThoCtpoQAvD_BwE


    Cant coment on them as I’ve never tried these (not my specific problem). If return policy is ok you might consider a try. Good luck!

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    One thing to consider:
    Changing the shoes substantially might, while solving one problem, cause unwanted other negtive effects.
    It happened to me that I once switched to safety shoes with integrated steel plate inlays and after three days of full-day use developed Plantar Fasciitis.

    So, whatever you might change in or add to the shoes, you better do it early and take lots of time and make lots of miles to let the feet get acustomed to it, before you start your hike.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Leo L. View Post
    One thing to consider:
    Changing the shoes substantially might, while solving one problem, cause unwanted other negtive effects.
    It happened to me that I once switched to safety shoes with integrated steel plate inlays and after three days of full-day use developed Plantar Fasciitis.

    So, whatever you might change in or add to the shoes, you better do it early and take lots of time and make lots of miles to let the feet get acustomed to it, before you start your hike.
    I don't have personal experience and everybody's different, but early riser didn't experience any problems. But then again he didn't have underlying problems to begin with. Like op said tictoc.

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    Ditto on the Allpurinol.
    I had it in my knee(s) eery 4-5 months and after going on the meds no problem.

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    If you need something stiff like the hiking boots that were mentioned, and they are no longer around. You may want to try putting a steel or carbon flat insole in the bottom of your shoe. It will maintain the torsional rigidity that were mentioned in the boots that were recommended. Football players use this as well for a symptom called turf toe.
    Look online and you will find them at any insole store. Better yet see if you can find them on amazon. If you do not like it, return it.
    Floyd

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    .............................

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    Depending on where I'm hiking, I really like hiking shoes with stiffer soles as these tend to give me much less foot fatigue. I relied for years on various Merrells, but alas, they stopped making my favorites, but now I do like a couple of Keen models, like the Keen Durand Low-top. Very stiff sole in those.

    https://www.amazon.com/KEEN-Durand-L...00HFY8R18?th=1

    I also like the Targhee II model, though I believe those soles are less stiff.

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    You need to be careful about shoe selection with any sort or rigidity, as shoes that restrict great toe bending are associated with worsening of gout-related problems. Probably an orthotic made by a specialist would be best, but this could be expensive and possibly not waterproof.

    What most people with early gout find is getting uric acid levels significantly down eventually prevents attacks, but you’d need to start this months before starting a long trail hike. If you do this you can also see improvement in the toe joint over time, and there could be no need for special shoe selection.

  12. #12
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    For Gout

    Take the meds

    Follow the diet



    Special shoes won’t do a thing for a flare up.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  13. #13
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    I find it mildly irritating when someone starts a thread and folks go out of their way to offer advice, and than you get no acknowledgment back. Or say you offer a free shuttle and get no response or acknowledgment back, kinda rude......(maybe I'm just hyper sensitive)?

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    You have to learn how to use this site over time, for new people, the etiquette isn’t always apparent.

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