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  1. #21

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    I buy Everclear by the half gallon in Montana. I forget what it costs, but it's not expensive. I use it with shellac flakes to make musical instrument varnish. Of course when I tell the seller that, they laugh and say "Sure, that's what everybody says". But really. I do not drink (over 25 years).

    I think that it's a good idea for backpacking stoves because you will end up inhaling toxins from methanol if you use denatured alcohol. Such toxins have been implicated in some types of degenerative mental conditions, including Alzheimer's. Read End of Alzheimers by Dr Bredesen. You might start to be more careful with the toxins that surround us. It is one of the "insults of modern life".

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by devoidapop View Post
    Yes, my statement was too broad.

    In Georgia consumption of alcohol or intoxicants is forbidden
    https://gastateparks.org/ParkRules

    In North Carolina possession or consumption are forbidden
    https://www.ncparks.gov/park-rules

    In Virginia state law permits alcohol use only in private areas (inside a cabin or camping unit) or in areas designated on permits issued by the Virginia Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control
    https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state-p...nd-regulations

    In Maryland alcohol may only be consumed in full service cabins
    https://dnr.maryland.gov/publiclands...lcoholfaq.aspx

    In Pennsylvania alcoholic beverages are not allowed in state parks
    https://pennsylvaniastateparks.reser...&parkId=880404

    Now, that's a lot legality to navigate in order to carry grain alcohol for a stove. Just use stove fuel.
    This thread was posted into the AT General subforum. How many miles of the AT go through the state parks listed? Does it go through any in NC? Other than PA, the other states refer to consumption.
    On PA game lands, it is unlawful to
    (9) Consume, possess or transport any alcohol, liquor, beer, malt or brewed alcoholic beverage.
    http://www.pacodeandbulletin.gov/Dis.../32-9/345.html
    "Sleepy alligator in the noonday sun
    Sleepin by the river just like he usually done
    Call for his whisky
    He can call for his tea
    Call all he wanta but he can't call me..."
    Robert Hunter & Ron McKernan

    Whiteblaze.net User Agreement.

  3. #23
    •Completed A.T. Section Hike GA to ME 1996 thru 2003 •Donating Member Skyline's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John B View Post
    Seems like VA is cool with booze as long as you're drinking it in your cabin or "camping unit." Do you have information that says otherwise?

    https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state-p...nd-regulations
    My tent is certainly a camping unit.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alligator View Post
    This thread was posted into the AT General subforum. How many miles of the AT go through the state parks listed? Does it go through any in NC? Other than PA, the other states refer to consumption.
    On PA game lands, it is unlawful to
    http://www.pacodeandbulletin.gov/Dis.../32-9/345.html
    Last night I was asking myself the very same question regarding where the AT crosses state parks. I'm not familiar with the northern half, but I can't think of any in the south. Even at Amicaloa, which is a rather small 900-acre park, it's my understanding that the AT trail head is outside of park boundaries.


    In re the AT specifically, this link provides a concise overview of the acquisition of land and development of the AT by the National Park Service, and because of that, I would assume that the AT corridor is subject to administrative rules and regs developed by that agency.
    https://www.nps.gov/appa/learn/manag...report-web.pdf

    And taking it one step further, I can't find a single rule or regulation that bans alcohol in national parks. When alcohol is mentioned, rules typically stay that drinking is to be confined to campsites, cabins, etc.
    https://www.nps.gov/aboutus/lawsandpolicies.htm

    All that said, this seems to be making a huge mountain out of an imaginary mole hill. If you want to use grain alcohol as a fuel, I can't see a single reason not to do so. If devoidapop can provide cites/links showing where and when a hiker was busted for carrying grain alcohol for fuel, I'd certainly like to read about it, and even if there has been a few instances, I would think they are highly anomalous.

    I'll shut up after this -- when I first started hiking, I carried a Brasslite stove (which is almost an art object) and Everclear as a fuel because I didn't want to breath the toxic fumes and didn't want the toxic residue from Heet on my cookware. It performed just fine as a fuel, and another advantage is that if you spill or if it leaks in your pack, it will evaporate very quickly without a residue. The downside was that when cooking in daylight hours, the flame is almost invisible, so caution is in order. But because I'm lazy, I quit using my Brasslite alcohol stove and now use Snowpeak and compressed gas.

    That's my .02

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skyline View Post
    My tent is certainly a camping unit.
    With that line of reasoning a thru hikers pack is a camping unit.

  6. #26

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    Interesting nit to pick, what defines a camping unit. Having some time on my hands, I took a walk through the regulator landscape in search of a definition. A "Camping Unit" is a legal definition with some State/local differences, but includes most of these tenets:

    "A camping unit is an outdoor space in a camping facility or designated area used for the express purpose of camping and contains outdoor constructed features, parking spaces for RVs or other vehicles, prepared tent sites, pads, platforms, or camp shelters."

    So from what I can see in various State regulations is a "Camping Unit" is more a place than gear related.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Traveler View Post
    Interesting nit to pick, what defines a camping unit. Having some time on my hands, I took a walk through the regulator landscape in search of a definition. A "Camping Unit" is a legal definition with some State/local differences, but includes most of these tenets:

    "A camping unit is an outdoor space in a camping facility or designated area used for the express purpose of camping and contains outdoor constructed features, parking spaces for RVs or other vehicles, prepared tent sites, pads, platforms, or camp shelters."

    So from what I can see in various State regulations is a "Camping Unit" is more a place than gear related.
    An interesting issue. If dispersed camping is specifically allowed, as it is along much of the AT (and you are not stealth camping illegally), I think one has a reasonable argument towards it being a "camping unit" or other such regulatory wording. Add that court decisions have gone both ways regarding expectation of privacy/searches by LE as to whether tents pitched on public lands meet the 4th amendment criteria of "...persons, houses, papers, and effects". Lots of gray area here.

  8. #28

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    Alcohol as a wound cleaner is bad. Google it, find a site that you trust. It's an old cowboy movie myth, don't do it.

  9. #29
    •Completed A.T. Section Hike GA to ME 1996 thru 2003 •Donating Member Skyline's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Traveler View Post
    Interesting nit to pick, what defines a camping unit. Having some time on my hands, I took a walk through the regulator landscape in search of a definition. A "Camping Unit" is a legal definition with some State/local differences, but includes most of these tenets:

    "A camping unit is an outdoor space in a camping facility or designated area used for the express purpose of camping and contains outdoor constructed features, parking spaces for RVs or other vehicles, prepared tent sites, pads, platforms, or camp shelters."

    So from what I can see in various State regulations is a "Camping Unit" is more a place than gear related.
    OK, but this definition does not explicitly exclude a tent, hammock, etc. as being a camping "unit." After all, these are two of the abodes that make camping in or at a tent pad, site, etc. possible. Certainly equal to an RV being considered a "camping unit."

  10. #30

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    Don't ask, don't tell.

    Much ado about nothing if you can keep your mouth shut.

    And you're going to end up with Heet anyway since it's readily available in the right amount for the job.
    UL, because nobody ever asks "How can I make my pack heavier?"

  11. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by Skyline View Post
    OK, but this definition does not explicitly exclude a tent, hammock, etc. as being a camping "unit." After all, these are two of the abodes that make camping in or at a tent pad, site, etc. possible. Certainly equal to an RV being considered a "camping unit."
    Good point, which in my view is covered by the elasticity of the regulatory language used in most of the regulations I saw, which allows campers and law enforcement flexibility either way. I would suggest tents/hammocks are included as a "camping unit" for a few reasons.

    First, if they are not specifically proscribed they are (likely) allowed with the caveat using camping units for illegal purposes can eliminate the presumed exclusion. It would not be difficult to argue that the governing body makes very clear in their regulations (either associated with or apart from camping unit definitions) what is not allowed. Given the different camping styles/equipment (car camping, cowboy camping, tarps, tents, fly cover, hammocks, etc.) are not specifically listed as "allowed", the intent to allow these as inclusions can be drawn from the lack of specific prohibitive language used in other prohibitions.

    Second and to the point 4EB makes, the language "designated area" used in most of the regulations I saw is interesting. In CT, only designated camping areas can be used so the language is very clear where one can camp. However, in areas where dispersed camping is allowed, the entire area by default is the "designated camping area" when an individual is using the area for the "express purpose of camping".
    Last edited by Traveler; 02-03-2020 at 10:27.

  12. #32
    Registered User turtle fast's Avatar
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    I wonder if anyone has used double twist shine to burn...170 proof plus.
    It was funny once as my dad and I were talking to a ranger once in Kentucky and the ranger said he would come across still sites all the time. Once their was a still they found by accident that was only a few hundred yards away from the ranger station!!

  13. #33
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    I use 97% alcohol. It’s great for cuts blisters, etc and cooking and fairly inexpensive.

  14. #34
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    I use 80% crown royal alcohol. It's great for sipping around the camp fire, eases the pain of cuts,blisters, and helps with sleep! But is expensive!

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