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  1. #21
    Registered User
    Join Date
    06-04-2018
    Location
    Husk NC
    Age
    65
    Posts
    296

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    You didn't mention what type of work that you do....that might be helpful.

    Many excellent suggestions from others. I suggest that you get a second job or work a lot of overtime at your current job. Put those extra earning into your "trail account".
    .................................................. .................................................. .................................................. ..........
    Travel not for the destination, but for the joy of the journey.

  2. #22
    Some days, it's not worth chewing through the restraints.
    Join Date
    12-13-2004
    Location
    Essex, Vermont
    Age
    64
    Posts
    2,316

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    I second peakbagger's "save the change" method. When I pay cash, I only use bills - all change goes in the jar. That usually adds up to 1 or 2 car payments a year!

    I once bought some treats from the bakery by my office, the bill came to something like $4.03, so the cashier only charged me $4. I was with a friend who used the same "save the change" technique, so he knew exactly what I meant when I said "she just saved me three cents and cost me ninety seven."

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by TexasBob View Post
    Good advice from many folks. Here is another way to do it - pay yourself first. Instead of putting what money you didn't spend in the bank at the end of month, put a set amount in on payday. If you put say $50 in your hiking savings account each payday, you will have no choice but to reduce your spending and likely you will find many ways to do so. It takes a little self discipline at first but it works.

    Exactly!

    Transfer the money into the savings account first, THEN figure out how to get by with what's left.

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by peakbagger View Post
    .....The fundamental problem is you have to train yourself to switch delayed gratification with immediate gratification.....
    Hit the nail on the head.
    If you don't stand for something, you will fall for anything.

  5. #25
    Registered User lonehiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    11-18-2005
    Location
    Cheyenne, WY
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,367

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    I retired at 44 because I practiced debt-free living. If you don't owe anything but routine monthly expenses it doesn't take much income to be comfortable. Early in my career I took a financial management course put on by Franklin (now Franklin Covey, or whatever it is called now). Part of the reading material was the book, "The Richest Man in Babylon" by George S Clason written in 1926 (still in print to this day). The points in the book are as applicable today as they were nearly 100 years ago. Dave Ramsey didn't invent the concepts he just delivers them well.

    Now, in retirement, I allocate a set amount each month to a hiking gear account and to a hiking trip account. Works well for me and allows me to always replace gear long before the "fail" date and I can fund a judicious number of hikes each season.
    Lonehiker

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