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  1. #1
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    Default Thur Hike Gear (essential, nonessential)

    Hi so I pretty sure i have most of my major gear set and ready to rock, but just as a curiosity what is some things that are not essential but essential to you personally? One thing I do not have that I'm open to suggestions is camp footwear?

  2. #2
    Registered User Last Call's Avatar
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    09-03-2013
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    Olive Branch, MS
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    Inflatable pillow....I like Sea to Summit or Big Agnes, both are good but can't recall the models....and a flask!
    Let's head for the roundhouse; they can't corner us there!

  3. #3

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    Essential:
    MP3 player and camera independent of the phone.
    Insulated, waterproof sit pad. (Piece of CCF)
    Ground sheet.

    Nonessential:
    Camp shoes.
    Water bladder.
    Follow slogoen on Instagram.

  4. #4
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    Haha the flask see this is why I asked this question

  5. #5
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    Any suggestions on camera?

  6. #6
    4eyedbuzzard's Avatar
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    Some often overlooked items: Toenail clippers? Tweezers for ticks and splinters? GI can opener (P-38 or P-51)? Sewing needle and thread? Benadryl (in case of allergic reaction to stings)? Backup credit card (in case primary card gets compromised)?
    Last edited by 4eyedbuzzard; 03-31-2020 at 14:04.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Haus8414 View Post
    Any suggestions on camera?
    I can totally see the argument for a separate camera, even though cellphone cams really are excellent these days. So that's a bit of extra weight and "care and feeding" that should be considered carefully.

    That said, a good option might be a Nikon Coolpix AW (all-weather). I have one of the earlier editions (AW 110, now up to 300) and have used it in dismal conditions such a cold rain with no problems ever and it is still going strong.
    UL, because nobody ever asks "How can I make my pack heavier?"

  8. #8

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    Some ideas: A pair of cotton socks for in-camp and night use, cheap flip-flops for camp, sit pad (thermo-rest Z pads are best in my view and very light), light weight water bottle that can be modified to scoop water for filtering, Gaitors (low cut) to keep trail duff out out your shoes, Uncle Bill's tweezer (the best tool to remove splinters and small thorns), plastic mesh onion bag to hang wet socks or other fabric from the pack, ICE (in case of emergency) listing in your cell phone for EMS use if needed, waterproof stuff sack(s) for gear that cannot get wet, small length of 3/8-inch cotton clothesline to hang wet gear or other camp needs, pill vial with Vaseline coated cotton balls to start a campfire in wet conditions or emergency, wide brim hat and head net for insects.

  9. #9

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    Maybe some Laundry Day Shorts. 2-gallon freezer Ziploc and small container of Dawn for a backcountry washing machine.

    Small tube of Lotrimin if you have athlete's foot.
    UL, because nobody ever asks "How can I make my pack heavier?"

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4eyedbuzzard View Post
    Toenail clippers? Tweezers for ticks and splinters? GI can opener (P-38 or P-51)? Sewing needle and thread? Benadryl (in case of allergic reaction to stings)? Backup credit card (in case primary card gets compromised)?
    These are all really good suggetions and I do all of them execept the GI can opener and Sewing needle/thread.

    Once I got all my gear dialed in the one thing I actually added was a Sea to Summit pillow. Use to just use my clothes bag, but for 2 ounces and something smaller than your fist, I found it worth it.
    The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
    Richard Ewell, CSA General


  11. #11

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    A good guide book whether digital or hard copy. For AT thru, can't go wrong with White Blaze Pages, Guthook or AWOL.

  12. #12
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    One should never hike without one's flask.

  13. #13

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    A backpacking flask does not have to be personalized or sophisticated:

    https://media.istockphoto.com/photos...vJzpKYRu598DI=

  14. #14

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    Everybody has different ideas as to what is truly essential, and what can be considered non-essential. A lot depends on how important creature comforts are to you, and how you can adapt without them. As you progress during your hike, you will figure out what you really need; and will be surprised that some "essential" things get sent home due to lack of use. That said, here are my lists, and a bit of explanation:
    Essential:
    1. Lightweight camp shoes
    2. High quality rain gear (it could save your life)
    3. Waterproof stuff sacks ( I have 8 of various sizes which allows me to keep my gear organized and ready to go in the morning).
    4. Dirty Girl Gaiters (wear them everyday)
    5. HikeGoo (Lanolin based lubricant for feet; slather it on every morning to help prevent blisters)
    6. Water scooper (cut the bottom off a Smartwater bottle)
    7. Premithrim treated clothes and tick remover
    8. Back scratcher (don't laugh; it's my one guilty pleasure and only weighs 1oz)
    9. Bag liner (silk; almost weightless, keeps your sleeping bag clean, and can be washed)

    Non-essential:
    1. Stove and pot (I go stoveless)
    2. Nalgene bottle (use Smartwater bottles)
    3. Extra water bags (I use a Sawyer filter; just screw it onto my Smartwater bottle, and drink away)
    4. Camp chair
    5. Multitool (heavy and rarely used)

  15. #15
    Hiker bigcranky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Panda View Post
    Everybody has different ideas as to what is truly essential, and what can be considered non-essential.
    Very true.

    On my "essential to me" list, that some hikers would find ridiculous:

    Good quality rain gear
    Waterproof roll top stuff sacks
    Permethrin treated clothing
    Water scoop (cut out of an old Sawyer bag)
    "Real" camera, I take a Sony RV100vi plus a couple of batteries and a wall charger
    Second set of clothing to have dry clothes in camp and also to wear in town
    Wide brimmed hat for sun protection
    Camp shoes, been using the same pair of rubber "Waldies" clogs I got at Neels Gap in 2003, got my money's worth
    Hiking sticks, also use them for my tent poles
    Ursack bear resistant bag, easier and faster than hanging
    Very light one-layer "wind shirt"
    "Sit pad" cut out of a piece of 3/8 inch foam
    Ken B
    'Big Cranky'
    Our Long Trail journal

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Traveler View Post
    Some ideas: A pair of cotton socks for in-camp and night use, cheap flip-flops for camp, sit pad (thermo-rest Z pads are best in my view and very light), light weight water bottle that can be modified to scoop water for filtering, Gaitors (low cut) to keep trail duff out out your shoes, Uncle Bill's tweezer (the best tool to remove splinters and small thorns), plastic mesh onion bag to hang wet socks or other fabric from the pack, ICE (in case of emergency) listing in your cell phone for EMS use if needed, waterproof stuff sack(s) for gear that cannot get wet, small length of 3/8-inch cotton clothesline to hang wet gear or other camp needs, pill vial with Vaseline coated cotton balls to start a campfire in wet conditions or emergency, wide brim hat and head net for insects.
    My camp socks are the same, just different color and taller ankle, as my hiking socks. That way if I have a problem, I have a backup pair of hiking socks. I only carry the camp socks and wear the 1 pr of hiking socks. Both are Darn Tough.
    https://tinyurl.com/MyFDresults

    A vigorous five-mile walk will do more good for an unhappy but otherwise healthy adult than all the medicine and psychology in the world. ~Paul Dudley White

  17. #17

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    Thought about buying a titanium flask from Vargo but can’t get over the cost of a bottle of soda. Empty and pour in your poison.

  18. #18

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    These make great flasks. You can squeeze up a shot each night.

    Capturef.JPG

  19. #19
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    The most essential non-essential gear is a foam sit pad, also used as a getting in/out of the tent 'landing'. I had one blow away on Big Bald or something like that, it must have flown for miles.

  20. #20
    Registered User English Stu's Avatar
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    04-21-2005
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    Kirmington,England
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    If out for weeks
    Teva sandals as camp shoes are my essential. Before hiking I think they are a luxury; but they are a blessing to have with you to rest warm tired feet. Good to wear in a hostel and they can be walked in for a spell if you have shoe or foot problems.
    Nail clippers- having a snagged nail can be irritating and rough stone to file the nail really does not solve it very well. When you have been out for a few weeks you realise you must have been out a while when all your nails need trimming.
    A Sea to Summit pillow is well worth having - more comfortable than a stuff sack of clothes.

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