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  1. #1
    Registered User UltraJoey's Avatar
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    Default Gear list checkup

    I'm building a gear list for possible long hike, once covid is out of the picture. I'd like to be sub 10 lbs, but am just a bit over. I know I've gone a bit on the comfort side, but I am talking a long, several month hike like at AT thru. Anyway... it was fun to build, and hopefully I will get to use. I thought I'd ask for opinions on this list, fully knowing I'm possibly opening a barn door. Any suggestions will be considered and appreciated!

    - removed link -


    Thanks!

    Note: I have plenty of backpacking experience. 21 years in the Marines, and many multi-day trips on the AT and PCT.

    I do plan on purchasing and testing this gear BEFORE heading on a long distance hike. A 100 mile / week long hike is a short, shake down hike in my opinion. I am looking for input before making these purchases. A bit of this gear I already have, but not all.

    My Intent: Just wanted to have fun and see if I can figure out how to lighten it up a bit more. Putting it all in a list helps. I've tried to include everything, like chapstick even. :-)
    Last edited by UltraJoey; 05-04-2020 at 12:22.

  2. #2
    Registered User Siestita's Avatar
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    :banana

    Obviously, you're planning to take the "never cook' approach to food. Have you thought through what foods you will carry and what (if any) cold preparation of these you will do? Will you be needing some sort of containers and/or a utensil for holding foods, soaking them, or eating them? Having no warm beverages and eating only snacks like trail mix and candy bars might become tiresome after a while during your "long hike".

    Carrying no first aid supplies at all, not even a few band aids and over-the-counter pain pills, might not be wise.

  3. #3
    Registered User UltraJoey's Avatar
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    I forgot the first aid kit, and added it. Thanks!

    Yes - no cook. There are many options besides trail mix for no cook backpacking. Many. That being said, I am considering a small stove, but right now I am comfortable with the no cook approach.

    Thanks for the feed back!
    Last edited by UltraJoey; 05-04-2020 at 05:07.

  4. #4
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    Default

    I’d need more . Spoon, rehydration jar , towel, dry clothing for camp sleeping, soap , 3 pair sox , warmer vest, jacket , ability to carry more water for camp.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by UltraJoey View Post
    I'm building a gear list for possible long hike, once covid is out of the picture. I'd like to be sub 10 lbs, but am just a bit over. I know I've gone a bit on the comfort side, but I am talking a long, several month hike like at AT thru. Anyway... it was fun to build, and hopefully I will get to use. I thought I'd ask for opinions on this list, fully knowing I'm possibly opening a barn door. Any suggestions will be considered and appreciated!

    https://lighterpack.com/r/wi7ssb


    [email protected]
    Acquire this gear and then take it out on a couple of overnighters with easy bailout, gradually extending to a couple of nights and then a week or 2, in good weather and bad. Any inadequacies will reveal themselves. It is not possible to have a perfectly dialed kit right out of the box with no experience. Three straight days of cold rain will teach you a lot.

    Good info HERE.
    UL, because nobody ever asks "How can I make my pack heavier?"

  6. #6
    Registered User UltraJoey's Avatar
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    Default

    Note: I have plenty of backpacking experience. 21 years in the Marines, and many multi-day trips on the AT and PCT.

    I do plan on purchasing and testing this gear BEFORE heading on a long distance hike. A 100 mile / week long hike is a short, shake down hike in my opinion. I am looking for input before making these purchases. A bit of this gear I already have, but not all.

    My Intent: Just wanted to have fun and see if I can figure out how to lighten it up a bit more. Putting it all in a list helps. I've tried to include everything, like chapstick even. :-)

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by UltraJoey View Post
    Note: I have plenty of backpacking experience. 21 years in the Marines, and many multi-day trips on the AT and PCT.

    I do plan on purchasing and testing this gear BEFORE heading on a long distance hike. A 100 mile / week long hike is a short, shake down hike in my opinion. I am looking for input before making these purchases. A bit of this gear I already have, but not all.

    My Intent: Just wanted to have fun and see if I can figure out how to lighten it up a bit more. Putting it all in a list helps. I've tried to include everything, like chapstick even. :-)
    No worries. That just looks like one of those "spreadsheet queen" lists.

    Could cut weight with the hammock going with 1.6 Hexon single vs 1.0 double (1.6 is plenty durable), and an 11' tarp is going to work better than 12' because it pitches right down to the hammock SRL without suspension strap interference.

    But maybe you already know this.
    UL, because nobody ever asks "How can I make my pack heavier?"

  8. #8
    Registered User colorado_rob's Avatar
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    Unless I'm confusing threads, I see you replaced the ULA OHM with a zpacks Arc Blast. The OHM is a decent pack (I did an entire AT with one, still have it and still use it sometimes), but the Arc blast carries better (I use an Arc haul now most of the time, I believe the Arc Blast is pretty similar, just different fabric, right?).

    I just noticed this is a Hammock forum, but I have no experience there, sorry, but I'll comment anyway on other things.

    BTW, I love those Possum items, I recently bought them myself, not sure of the long term durability, but sure are comfy and light.

    One clothing comment: That R1 hoodie is 14.1 ounces. A 7 ounce lighter fleece with a 7 ounce UL down or synthetic (slightly heavier) sweater might be a more flexible choice, depending on where and when you'll be hiking, just my own preference; more but lighter layers.

    Last comment: over the decades of backpacking, I have found that below 10-11 pounds of base weight, it matters not to me in terms of hiking comfort. I was down to 9 or so for a while. Adding a couple of comfort items, I'm back to 11 or so for summer and late spring/early fall hiking (in CO). Saying it another way, once my total pack weight is below 23-24 pounds or so, I quit noticing it.

    Enjoy! And yeah, get out there and use the stuff.

  9. #9

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    Why the extra pouches/pockets? For packing? No need to have stuff in different compartments.

    Tear out the pages from your guide that correspond to your section.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by colorado_rob View Post
    Unless I'm confusing threads, I see you replaced the ULA OHM with a zpacks Arc Blast. The OHM is a decent pack (I did an entire AT with one, still have it and still use it sometimes), but the Arc blast carries better (I use an Arc haul now most of the time, I believe the Arc Blast is pretty similar, just different fabric, right?).

    I just noticed this is a Hammock forum, but I have no experience there, sorry, but I'll comment anyway on other things.

    BTW, I love those Possum items, I recently bought them myself, not sure of the long term durability, but sure are comfy and light.

    One clothing comment: That R1 hoodie is 14.1 ounces. A 7 ounce lighter fleece with a 7 ounce UL down or synthetic (slightly heavier) sweater might be a more flexible choice, depending on where and when you'll be hiking, just my own preference; more but lighter.
    Ive been considering changing my layering system and have been reading a lot about “active insulation”. I keep coming back to exactly what you recommend, the most basic fleece you can find (no hood, zippers, etc.) and my down sweater.

  11. #11

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    If you only hike July/August you don't need much in the way of clothes. Or much of anything else.
    Follow slogoen on Instagram.

  12. #12
    Registered User UltraJoey's Avatar
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    Thanks for the valuable feedback, all. I usually don't talk gear, but need something to do until I can get out there.

  13. #13
    Registered User UltraJoey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by colorado_rob View Post
    Unless I'm confusing threads, I see you replaced the ULA OHM with a zpacks Arc Blast. The OHM is a decent pack (I did an entire AT with one, still have it and still use it sometimes), but the Arc blast carries better (I use an Arc haul now most of the time, I believe the Arc Blast is pretty similar, just different fabric, right?).

    I just noticed this is a Hammock forum, but I have no experience there, sorry, but I'll comment anyway on other things.

    BTW, I love those Possum items, I recently bought them myself, not sure of the long term durability, but sure are comfy and light.

    One clothing comment: That R1 hoodie is 14.1 ounces. A 7 ounce lighter fleece with a 7 ounce UL down or synthetic (slightly heavier) sweater might be a more flexible choice, depending on where and when you'll be hiking, just my own preference; more but lighter layers.

    Last comment: over the decades of backpacking, I have found that below 10-11 pounds of base weight, it matters not to me in terms of hiking comfort. I was down to 9 or so for a while. Adding a couple of comfort items, I'm back to 11 or so for summer and late spring/early fall hiking (in CO). Saying it another way, once my total pack weight is below 23-24 pounds or so, I quit noticing it.

    Enjoy! And yeah, get out there and use the stuff.
    I did swap the pack on the list for the Zpacks Arc Blast. I love the OHM, but would use the Arc Blast for a long distance hike.

    I kept thinking about swapping the R1 hoodie with a fleece. I do have layers built into this pack out. Thanks!

    This list is manly for fun, and to see just what weight I was considering carrying. I agree, below 23-24 lbs, not noticeable.

  14. #14
    Registered User UltraJoey's Avatar
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    I use a double layer wih a pad in temps above 35F. I have considered what you suggest, going with the single layer option, but I'd like to send the UQ home once things got warm enough.


    Good point on the tarp size!! Dropped 2oz there!

  15. #15
    Registered User UltraJoey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmoulder View Post
    No worries. That just looks like one of those "spreadsheet queen" lists.

    Could cut weight with the hammock going with 1.6 Hexon single vs 1.0 double (1.6 is plenty durable), and an 11' tarp is going to work better than 12' because it pitches right down to the hammock SRL without suspension strap interference.

    But maybe you already know this.
    I use a double layer wih a pad in temps above 35F. I have considered what you suggest, going with the single layer option, but I'd like to send the UQ home once things got warm enough.


    Good point on the tarp size!! Dropped 2oz there!

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