Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3
Results 41 to 59 of 59
  1. #41

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    Go to a higher elevation with greater exposure and/or shadier trail.
    Night hike. Avoid hiking strenuously during the hottest part of the day.
    Stay hydrated. This begins before hitting a TH!
    Stay fueled. No energy roller coasting.
    Cooling foods and herbs - cucumbers, radishes, cilantro, greens, sprouts, raspberries, watermelon, strawberries, cherries, mangoes, lemon, lemon balm, red hibiscus, cardamon, mint - foods with higher moisture content which equals eating some of your water needs rather than drinking it. If rose hips are available squish some into water. Avoid warming foods like cayenne or curries.
    Light apparel colors loosely wrapping up exposed skin. Cover up. Ventible hat.
    Pace slower. Rest. Go to a lighter wt TPW.
    Sleep higher.

    Slow down the mind.
    I BP’d at higher elevation last week and the sun was searing in the open areas...got quite sunburned (forgot my hat). I should have hiked after dark as you suggest because it was very cool and comfortable.

  2. #42

  3. #43
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-23-2019
    Location
    Harpers ferry wv.
    Age
    56
    Posts
    926

    Default

    Very cool! Now if these hats could store the solar energy . You could wear all day and then when it comes time to rest and recover and it's still hot at night, hey turn your hat fan on and put that disposable cold pack on your neck and drift off into cooling sleep......

  4. #44
    Registered User
    Join Date
    11-01-2014
    Location
    Norwell, MA
    Age
    58
    Posts
    2,281

    Default

    Something I haven't seen posted on this thread yet is choosing to wear cotton, cotton blend, or wool cloths as you can get them wet and they evaporate in the heat at a useful rate. One of the many down sides to synthetic fabrics in the heat is that when you soak them, the evaporate to fast so they are unpleasantly cold and don't stay as a cooling tool for any length of time. So yeah, that wet cotton may kill on a cold night (or day) but it can be a life savor in dry heat.
    I'm not lost. I'm exploring.

  5. #45

    Default

    I agree with the above, synthetic shirts for me are not all that comfortable in high temperatures (though oddly synthetic shorts and socks are) and I prefer hiking in cotton shirts in summer temperatures. LL Bean has/had a nice tee shirt (No Fly Zone?) that is about 65% poly, 30% cotton, and 5% spandex (approximates). The shirt wicks well but the cotton blend slows evaporates rate that keeps a cooling action going for most of the day. Having been full cycle with the cotton/synthetic debate, I've found a range of clothing that work well from cotton alone to cotton/synthetic blends in summer, synthetics in fall/spring, to wool/synthetic blends in below freezing temperatures.

    I find summer hiking to be uncomfortable overall, but I don't like being shut out of the activity in July and August. Once I returned to cotton shirts I've not looked back and am able to keep conditioning at a level that allows jumping into the fall season (the absolute best in my view) without missing a beat.

  6. #46
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-17-2020
    Location
    Wake Forest, NC
    Posts
    5

    Default

    All synthetic clothing for me, trail runners instead of boots, lots of water and spare undies for bedtime. Other that that I use a tarp set high/flat for shade over the hammock. You could look into a monolite hammock for maximum airflow, it's a strong, lightweight mesh. Tents are just too hot and stagnant.

  7. #47
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-01-2016
    Location
    Chattanooga, Tennessee
    Posts
    921

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Traveler View Post
    I agree with the above, synthetic shirts for me are not all that comfortable in high temperatures (though oddly synthetic shorts and socks are) and I prefer hiking in cotton shirts in summer temperatures. LL Bean has/had a nice tee shirt (No Fly Zone?) that is about 65% poly, 30% cotton, and 5% spandex (approximates). The shirt wicks well but the cotton blend slows evaporates rate that keeps a cooling action going for most of the day. Having been full cycle with the cotton/synthetic debate, I've found a range of clothing that work well from cotton alone to cotton/synthetic blends in summer, synthetics in fall/spring, to wool/synthetic blends in below freezing temperatures.

    I find summer hiking to be uncomfortable overall, but I don't like being shut out of the activity in July and August. Once I returned to cotton shirts I've not looked back and am able to keep conditioning at a level that allows jumping into the fall season (the absolute best in my view) without missing a beat.
    I agree with this - following the "cotton kills" mantra unquestioningly in the heat of summer can make hiking life more miserable, not less.

    The other day I was lucky enough to hike at elevation here in the southeast, temps around 65F mid-morning, rising to 70F or so. For bug and sun protection I went off-board and chose a longsleeve, 70% cotton Insect Shield shirt. Did I sweat on the climbs? Sure. Did I sweat more? Probably not, and, coupled with a wide brimmed hat and IS-treated pants (65% polyester, 35% cotton), I was able to avoid sunscreen and bug spray. A light breeze and cooler temps, the shirt dried off fairly well at stops. Not completely, but substantially (turns out, I didn't really get much sun exposure until the turnaround point on the bald). And on the downhill return, I stayed dry.

    So finding the right balance of materials, in light of weather conditions and hike type - it can lead to a better experience than being an absolutist on cotton.

  8. #48
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-23-2019
    Location
    Harpers ferry wv.
    Age
    56
    Posts
    926

    Default

    That's why you see farmers out there working in their fields with cotton flannel shirts and landscapers out there working in long sleeves . It's thermal cooling or convection cooling.

  9. #49
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-01-2016
    Location
    Chattanooga, Tennessee
    Posts
    921

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JNI64 View Post
    That's why you see farmers out there working in their fields with cotton flannel shirts and landscapers out there working in long sleeves . It's thermal cooling or convection cooling.
    I think it's termed evaporative cooling, IIRC from my prior days as a motorcyclist. Evaporative cooling vests are popular in summertime, esp. under an armored-but-mesh riding jacket. They contain some kind of hydrophilic (?) gel material that you saturate with water, and it takes quite awhile to evaporate (depends on conditions), cooling you the whole time as air flows over it through the jacket mesh. A soaked t-shirt does the same thing but doesn't last nearly as long.

  10. #50
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-23-2019
    Location
    Harpers ferry wv.
    Age
    56
    Posts
    926

    Default

    What is thermal cooling? Cooling is removal of heat usually resulting in a lower temperature lowering by any other means may also be called cooling the transfer of thermal energy may occur via thermal radiation, heat conduction or convection.I also think you're correct it's also dubbed evaporative cooling as well.

  11. #51
    Registered User colorado_rob's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-20-2012
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Age
    64
    Posts
    4,367
    Images
    3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JNI64 View Post
    Well that was my plan before the big C-word came around. I was planning on being out there to hike the collegiate west beginning of September. I was out there last labor day week spent a couple days at twin lakes and btw experienced record heat low 90's Denver was 100' . But i had to come back due to medical issue, come to find out it was fluid on the heart . Had to spend a week resting kinda scary got lucky that's all it was.But anyway maybe next year will be the year for the collegiate and the maroon bells.
    YEah, I remember you earlier talking about coming out, and I had wondered what had happened, sorry you had that condition and hopefully all resolved.

    FWIW, the CO trail is quite the "zoo" this year, I've hike off and on it all spring/summer this year, lots and lots of folks using it as a consolation hike to skipping off the PCT (and other longer trails). For example, two years ago, we "owned " a gorgeous camp site about 4 miles into section 21, doing that same stretch, same time of year this year we camped there with about 25 CT thru-hikers, yikes (but great folks, we had fun with them). I also hike a part of the C-loop, very crowded. Hopefully next year will be better.

    I also think a plain old cotton t-shirt is awesome when hiking in heat, way more comfortable than synthetic.

  12. #52
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-23-2019
    Location
    Harpers ferry wv.
    Age
    56
    Posts
    926

    Default

    Thanks Rob I appreciate it. I wasn't feeling good about 3 weeks out from my trip with chest pains that got worse when I laid down. But 1 week out got feeling better but then when I got out there I couldn't get my breathing corrected and chest pains came back . I did some small day hikes but couldn't really catch my breath correctly. So reluctantly I came home and went to the doctor and the diagnosis " fluid on the heart" . I consider myself lucky it wasn't something worse. Within a week of rest it cleared up by itself. And thank you about telling me about the overcrowding on the trail it does make me feel better because that's not what I'm looking for.

  13. #53

    Default

    Happy to hear you responded to what your body was telling you and left a planned trip to get help early enough so the condition could be addressed easily. A cautionary tale to be sure!

  14. #54

    Default

    As a section hiker, you can pick the time of year where the weather is best. Admittedly, there are some professions e.g. teachers who don't have that flexibility. During my 20s to mid 50s, I lived in the DC area, a reasonable distance from the AT. I confined my summer sections to day hikes in Northern VA, MD, and Southern PA. The only mid-summer section hike I did was joining a friend for a few days on his thruhike in NJ. Utterly miserable with extreme humidity and mosquitoes. Although I intended to hike with him for 10 days, I quit after 3, went back in late August to much nicer weather, and finished NJ and NY west of the Hudson. All my other sections were in late winter, spring, late summer, and fall. Of course the one exception is the White Mountains which I did in July.

    As most of you know, the ATC has been encouraging alternate forms of hiking the whole trail in one season flipflopping from different points. Before they began advocating this approach, I had decided that if I ever attempt a thruhike (doubtful at this point in my life), I'd do the following:

    1. Start at Harpers Ferry on St. Patrick's Day or the Spring Equinox, hike south to Springer with goal of arriving in early June
    2. Head out to Colorado, base camp around Leadville, and do short hikes including some 14ers to maintain aerobic fitness.
    3. Make reservations at Katahdin Stream CG, head to Baxter around August 5, ascent Katahdin on any trail, then start the SOBO to Harpers Ferry.

    This way, you have the pleasure of experiencing the entire seasons of both spring and fall while skipping most of the awful summer heat.

    Obviously you need to have the time on your hands and flexibility to pull this off. And while you'll certainly meet fellow hikers, you won't experience the full social aspects of making new friends with whom you share campsites and other experiences. Personally, that doesn't bother me - it depends on what you're seeking.

  15. #55

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by colorado_rob View Post
    ...I also think a plain old cotton t-shirt is awesome when hiking in heat, way more comfortable than synthetic.
    Especially in the west where even cotton dries quickly in the dry air.

  16. #56

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Roper View Post
    Most of my AT trips have been in the summer and all of them in the South. The difficulties of heat and humidity are largely offset by the good things - long days, ability to pack light (no extra clothing), the lush beauty of the season, and the magnificence of a breeze on high ridges and gaps. 4,000 feet seems to be the magic contour interval in Ga, NC, Tenn, and Virginia. Above that it's always comparatively pleasant. Below that can be stiflingly miserable.
    Yes, in the South you have those high elevations which will provide relief from the heat of the valleys. For that reason, I believe - and this is buttressed by experience - that with respect to heat, the mid-Atlantic is worse than the South because you're rarely above 1,500', the humidity is intense, and the mosquitoes make things miserable, particularly in evenings. And this is the problem with a "traditional" S-N thruhike: most hikers go through MD-PA-NJ-NY-CT smack in the early-to-mid summer when all these conditions are at their worst.

  17. #57

    Default

    Having slogged thru Cumberland Valley, Alec Kennedy to Darlington, last July can attest to heat, humidity and especially skeeters. Short day to the cool bar at the Doyle was nice recompense.

  18. #58
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-27-2019
    Location
    Hudson County, New Jersey
    Age
    23
    Posts
    2

    Default

    i purchased all of my hiking wear from https://www.apparelshopusa.com/10-activewear

  19. #59
    Registered User
    Join Date
    05-18-2018
    Location
    Chesapeake, Ohio
    Age
    37
    Posts
    7

    Default

    This is probably only feasible for day hikes, but a 2 liter Camelback (or something similar) filled with ice and water will stay cold for a few hours. If I start (possibly very) early and bring a Camelback, staying cool usually isn't an issue.

    For overnights or hikes lasting a few days or more, I just start hiking early and slow my pace when the day heats up.

    But, yeah, I feel you. I hiked the same local trail here in southern Ohio twice last week. One day it was in the upper 80s, and on the other day the high was 70. My experience of the trail was very different on the two days.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •