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  1. #1

    Default WTB Brunton Canister Stove Stand

    Looking for a couple Brunton brand or similar.

    0e7c31b9-e266-4622-a1c7-7c743daccc12.jpeg

  2. #2

  3. #3
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
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    Lol, that's funky smooth good stuff had me !! Good luck, keep looking!!

  4. #4

  5. #5
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    Looks very similar to my Primus Himalayan Multi Fuel Stove.
    Or is the Brunton somehow different?
    Wayne

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by zelph View Post
    It was a fun way to say I'm still looking
    I have one I could part with. Only used to play with on the porch. I think I got it used from someone else who had just used it to play with. Send me a message and I'll figure out how to get it to you.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by jimqpublic View Post
    I have one I could part with. Only used to play with on the porch. I think I got it used from someone else who had just used it to play with. Send me a message and I'll figure out how to get it to you.
    Message on the way ....thank you for searching

    Looks very similar to my Primus Himalayan Multi Fuel Stove.
    Or is the Brunton somehow different?
    Wayne
    I'll google that one and compare. Thank you for the reply

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Venchka View Post
    Looks very similar to my Primus Himalayan Multi Fuel Stove.
    Or is the Brunton somehow different?
    Wayne
    You can attach any upright canister stove to the Brunton. Can't do that with the Primus Him.

    I want to create a remote canister stove using the Brunton and a Soto Windmaster stove to be used on small backpacking size propane canisters that have a lindal valve. Canister contains 4 fluid oz. of propane. Putting together an extreme cold weather kit for a friend.

  9. #9
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimqpublic View Post
    I have one I could part with. Only used to play with on the porch. I think I got it used from someone else who had just used it to play with. Send me a message and I'll figure out how to get it to you.
    Whiteblaze at its best!! Good people, priceless!!

  10. #10
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zelph View Post
    You can attach any upright canister stove to the Brunton. Can't do that with the Primus Him.

    I want to create a remote canister stove using the Brunton and a Soto Windmaster stove to be used on small backpacking size propane canisters that have a lindal valve. Canister contains 4 fluid oz. of propane. Putting together an extreme cold weather kit for a friend.
    Ok, a little beyond my comprehension .... sorry for..... BUT, we've always been taught propane no good in the cold much less extreme cold. So just simply turning the liquid propane upside down with the proper stove good to cook no matter the cold? Do you have to keep the canister warm when not in use like in your pocket or whatever? Seems like a much better alternative to white gas? Yes or no ?

  11. #11

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    Propane is good down to -40F. You can keep the canister upright and it should do well. Butane/iso butane have problems in -10F. You have to keep them warm.
    The Soto Micro Regulator Stove has the ability to automatically regulate gas pressure going to the burner head to prevent too much gas being used. It helps us to be efficient in the use of fuel. For sure, using propane is much better than using white gas.

    The Brunton stove stand attaches to the propane canister, the Soto stove attaches to the Brunton stove stand. Now that gives me 2 control valves, one at the cansiter and one at the stove. It's my way of incorporating safety in case the canister is tipped over before the stove has properly heated up to evaporate liquid fuel. Having the 2 valves will allow me to use propane in all weather conditions. In theory, this arrangement should work well if a little time is taken at home to become familiar with regulating the gas with the 2 valves.

  12. #12

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    A good cold weather set-up would be to attach a MSR Reactor stove to the stand and remote feed 95% propane from a small canister

    The Reactor:

    reactor-brn-head.jpg

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by zelph View Post
    . . . to be used on small backpacking size propane canisters . . . Putting together an extreme cold weather kit for a friend.
    Small propane canisters sound like fun. But, if you are putting together an inverted canister setup (already heavier and more complicated), why add the complication of propane when the standard isobutane/propane mix canisters work fine into extreme temps when inverted. And, why invert propane when it would work upright to temperatures approaching -40. And, at -40, gasket material in the canister stove and inversion adapter might get questionable. If I was expecting to be below -20 or so, I think I'd consider pulling out my MSR XGK again.
    I'm not lost. I'm exploring.

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by nsherry61 View Post
    Small propane canisters sound like fun. But, if you are putting together an inverted canister setup (already heavier and more complicated), why add the complication of propane when the standard isobutane/propane mix canisters work fine into extreme temps when inverted. And, why invert propane when it would work upright to temperatures approaching -40. And, at -40, gasket material in the canister stove and inversion adapter might get questionable. If I was expecting to be below -20 or so, I think I'd consider pulling out my MSR XGK again.
    Since I posted this thread I was able to do a large amount of research that led me to know I no longer need to have an inverted canister set-up due to the fact like you said.....no need to invert because it will boil off fuel at temperatures approaching -40 degrees.

    The Brunton stove stand makes for a nice stable support base for most stoves. Having a stove on hard packed snow needs to be stabilized to the max.

  15. #15
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zelph View Post
    Propane is good down to -40F. You can keep the canister upright and it should do well. Butane/iso butane have problems in -10F. You have to keep them warm.
    The Soto Micro Regulator Stove has the ability to automatically regulate gas pressure going to the burner head to prevent too much gas being used. It helps us to be efficient in the use of fuel. For sure, using propane is much better than using white gas.

    The Brunton stove stand attaches to the propane canister, the Soto stove attaches to the Brunton stove stand. Now that gives me 2 control valves, one at the cansiter and one at the stove. It's my way of incorporating safety in case the canister is tipped over before the stove has properly heated up to evaporate liquid fuel. Having the 2 valves will allow me to use propane in all weather conditions. In theory, this arrangement should work well if a little time is taken at home to become familiar with regulating the gas with the 2 valves.
    Thank you for the propane 101 lessons. I just assumed that propane being a liquid gas would have problems in extreme cold. It's when propane is mixed with other gasses is the issue.I like getting out in the cold I'll be looking into a winter stove.

  16. #16

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    Sade packing that six! Hotter than most of these stoves.

  17. #17
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HankIV View Post
    Sade packing that six! Hotter than most of these stoves.
    Yes indeed! Since I've watched this video other sade videos have popped up. A pleasure to watch for sure.

  18. #18
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    Why reinvent the wheel?
    The Scandinavians have been making winter friendly stoves since forever.
    I own the Svea 123 and Primus Himalayan MFS stoves. Cold doesn’t phase either one.
    Wayne

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Venchka View Post
    Why reinvent the wheel?
    The Scandinavians have been making winter friendly stoves since forever.
    I own the Svea 123 and Primus Himalayan MFS stoves. Cold doesn’t phase either one.
    Wayne
    With my newfound propane canisters all stoves will work well in frigid winter conditions....especially this coming winter when the Polar Vortex dips down into Texas

    edit to add:
    Fuel Energy (kcal/kg)

    Primus liquid fuel 11900
    Propane gas 12000
    Butane gas 11800
    Petrol 10200
    Kerosene 10100
    Diesel 9800
    Coal (approx.) 8400
    Methylated spirits 6300
    Dry wood 4000
    Last edited by zelph; 08-21-2020 at 23:26.

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