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  1. #21

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    just hike with a slower partner, then run away faster than they can.
    just kidding. maybe...
    https://tinyurl.com/MyFDresults

    A vigorous five-mile walk will do more good for an unhappy but otherwise healthy adult than all the medicine and psychology in the world. ~Paul Dudley White

  2. #22
    GoldenBear's Avatar
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    Thumbs down Another repeat of this VERY tired joke

    I'm glad you're joking.
    The fast person who runs will get chased by the bear, and thus attacked.
    The slow person who is intelligent enough to NOT run, but simply walks away in a quiet manner, will be fine.

    When you meet a bear, the first thing to remember is that running is the STUPIDEST thing you can do.

    I really wish this "joke" would just vanish by people refusing to repeat it.

  3. #23

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    I hike in Yellowstone, and the area around, so along with black bears, I also have to deal with grizzlies (and wolves and bison and elk and mosquitoes...). Bison are the scariest. I carry two canisters of bear sprayówith one always accessible, and I talk and yell and sing as I hike. Even in camp and at night if I wake, I will talk. I keep a clean camp, and pray that the people before me have done so as well. There have been 8 bear attacks in the region, by August 1st, *this year*. Itís not a just a monster under the bed thing, these were real incidents. The day before I started a recent hike, the park service destroyed a black bear that had attacked a woman and a child at a campsite I was scheduled to stay at. On my first night of that hike, as the sun was going down, I was setting up things in my tent, when I heard an odd sound. I said, ďHey bear,Ē and I heard the thump thump as something ran behind my tent, past, and away from the tent, then stop. I grabbed bear spray, while hoping it was a deer, and peeked out of the tent vestibule to see a young black bear, about 15 yards away. S/he was looking at me, to see what I was hollering about. I told him to leave, that it was my campsite. He continued to look at me. I told him to leave again, and he started to browse where he was. I got a little louder, and told him it was my campsite, and he trotted over the hill. In every instance when Iíve had a bear visit camp or along a trail, Iíve talked so the bear knows Iím there and exactly where I am, and theyíve moved away. You canít plan for every situation, but making noise so the bears know youíre there seems to help.

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by appstate_mj View Post
    Not sure whether to post this here or in hiker safety. But I've never encountered a bear before (this will only be my 3rd section hike)...I'm doing part of the GSMNP....so my question is, what do I do if I see a bear? I've done some research, but any advice/tips? Both close up, and also not just if they are close...but what if for example I saw one 50 yds or so away...do I make noise to make it go away? Or just wait until it leaves before attempting to hike by? Also thoughts on bear bells...do they work?
    I see bears on about 75% of my smokies hikes. The most important thing is to remain calm. I know this will be difficult. The bear can most definitely sense your anxiety so it is important to minimize this as much as possible. If I'm moving through thick rhododendrons I usually tap my hiking poles together as a signal. If you happen to see one at 50 yards, just remain calm make sure it sees you and wait for it to wander off. This is what happens on 99% of my bear encounters there. I did have a difficult camp bear at one of the backcountry sites years ago but these are not too common.

  5. #25
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
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    Pringles, with all the bear attacks in Yellowstone do you think it's part due to parts of the park being shutdown because of the virus? I've been seeing where the beasts have been taking over again since us humans left for a bit. Another black bear story on the east coast, wasn't it the smokies or was it snp when a black bear attacked that kid in his hammock? Father not far away saved him.

  6. #26
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    Tom Smith is a foremost bear biologists. If you search on line for his articles or videos he has some great advice, all based on the best science. One thing you learn from him is that much of the advice you will hear is misguided, wrong, or dangerous. What I learned is that the bear is in charge, meaning that you response is dictated by what the bear does. If the bear is 50 yards away and showing no signs of aggression or fear, then making noise may take a benign situation and make it worse. If the bear is showing signs of nervousness, again, being aggressive may only make matters worse. Where the encounter occurs matters. Is it in a developed area were the bear is not supposed to be or out in the woods. Two very important things to know in advance. If you see a bear, never run and if in a group, always stay together. Running is the response most highly correlated with bad outcomes and bears almost never attack a group of people. Also know that black and grizzly bear behaviour is different, so know the difference.

  7. #27
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    Another black bear story on the east coast, wasn't it the smokies or was it snp when a black bear attacked that kid in his hammock? Father not far away saved him


    that was the smokys.....

    the area of the park where the kid was in a campsite is heavily used....

    and some people bring these carts up the trail loaded with all kinds of things and all kinds of food...

    i was camped near a group like this that one morning cooked up two pounds of bacon......

    they literally had a breakfast buffet with a couple dozen eggs and pancakes as well.....

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Odd Man Out View Post
    Tom Smith is a foremost bear biologists. If you search on line for his articles or videos he has some great advice, all based on the best science. One thing you learn from him is that much of the advice you will hear is misguided, wrong, or dangerous. What I learned is that the bear is in charge, meaning that you response is dictated by what the bear does. If the bear is 50 yards away and showing no signs of aggression or fear, then making noise may take a benign situation and make it worse. If the bear is showing signs of nervousness, again, being aggressive may only make matters worse. Where the encounter occurs matters. Is it in a developed area were the bear is not supposed to be or out in the woods. Two very important things to know in advance. If you see a bear, never run and if in a group, always stay together. Running is the response most highly correlated with bad outcomes and bears almost never attack a group of people. Also know that black and grizzly bear behaviour is different, so know the difference.
    Exactly! Iíve seen many bears and my response is always different depending on the situation. A few months ago, I encountered a largish bear about 50 yards ahead of me, standing on the trail and facing me. I stopped and the bear showed no fear, he just stood there. That was my cue to leave the bear undisturbed, back up, and turn around, constantly glancing back to make sure he wasnít following. Itís his habitat and there was no need to frighten him just so I could hike a few more miles.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Odd Man Out View Post
    Tom Smith is a foremost bear biologists. If you search on line for his articles or videos he has some great advice, all based on the best science. One thing you learn from him is that much of the advice you will hear is misguided, wrong, or dangerous. What I learned is that the bear is in charge, meaning that you response is dictated by what the bear does. If the bear is 50 yards away and showing no signs of aggression or fear, then making noise may take a benign situation and make it worse. If the bear is showing signs of nervousness, again, being aggressive may only make matters worse. Where the encounter occurs matters. Is it in a developed area were the bear is not supposed to be or out in the woods. Two very important things to know in advance. If you see a bear, never run and if in a group, always stay together. Running is the response most highly correlated with bad outcomes and bears almost never attack a group of people. Also know that black and grizzly bear behaviour is different, so know the difference.

    So are you saying that in most circumstances it is best to not make noise? At what point does noise need to be made? I would think at some point a strong calm voice might be advisable just to make sure he knows you're there.I've thought about whistles before but every time I hear one I think about how it might sound like a distressed rabbit or something to a predator.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by PennyPincher View Post
    just hike with a slower partner, then run away faster than they can.
    just kidding. maybe...
    Just a couple of years ago maybe last year i can't keep track, but I think new jersey a group of kids were being followed by a bear all sticking together like they should until one decided to run,well the runner got chased down by the bear and killed. But I know you were just joking. Maybe?

  11. #31
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    Please don't beat me up to bad if my facts are off, I'm a very sensitive person. But I think the last like 100 years there's been 6,7 black bear attacks on the east coast. Just a couple killed with human meat found inside the bears stomach. I would put bear attacks way down the fear factor list or concerned list i don't like the word fear. Tics being no 1 concern for me then probably a rabid animal a hiker had to kill a rabid coyote last year with a knife i think va..then losing focus hiking and stepping on a venomous snake. Then probably a rabid or dislodged person/ crazy person to deal with. Then maybe the bear concerns .

  12. #32
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    Exclamation Six years ago, to be exact

    https://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/23/n...ew-jersey.html

    This group (1) approached the bear and then (2) took PennyPincher's advice. Because they believed this old "joke", one of them died -- the only death by a bear in New Jersey EVER recorded.

    Again, I wish this "joke" would just die by people being smart enough to not repeat it.

  13. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by Five Tango View Post
    So are you saying that in most circumstances it is best to not make noise? At what point does noise need to be made? I would think at some point a strong calm voice might be advisable just to make sure he knows you're there.I've thought about whistles before but every time I hear one I think about how it might sound like a distressed rabbit or something to a predator.
    First and foremost, you are not supposed to disturb the wildlife...we are visitors. Occasionally, if itís real quiet and I get that creepy feeling, Iíll knock my trekking poles together when approaching a blind curve or switchback. Otherwise, I try to hike quietly and consider it a privilege to see a bear. My actions when seeing bears are based on the ĎI wonít bother you if you donít bother meí principle and so far it has been successful.

    I have experienced aggressive bears at shelters and that is an entirely different situation. The last time I camped, I had that creepy feeling so stacked rocks outside my tent, just in case.
    Last edited by Traffic Jam; 08-05-2020 at 19:35.

  14. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoldenBear View Post
    https://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/23/n...ew-jersey.html

    This group (1) approached the bear and then (2) took PennyPincher's advice. Because they believed this old "joke", one of them died -- the only death by a bear in New Jersey EVER recorded.

    Again, I wish this "joke" would just die by people being smart enough to not repeat it.



    i just read this article and not sure where you got "approached" from..

    It says---"They encountered a black bear, which began to follow them, according to the police in West Milford, a township that includes the preserve."




    And yes, encountered can mean a lot of things but it's not clearly defined in this situation........

  15. #35

  16. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by Odd Man Out View Post
    Interesting, entertaining, and wise advice. But there’s a big difference between Eastern black bears and bears found in other parts of North America. I wouldn’t characterize people as “stupid” for choosing to not carry bear spray on the AT or other trails in the southeast.

  17. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by appstate_mj View Post
    Not sure whether to post this here or in hiker safety. But I've never encountered a bear before (this will only be my 3rd section hike)...I'm doing part of the GSMNP....so my question is, what do I do if I see a bear? I've done some research, but any advice/tips? Both close up, and also not just if they are close...but what if for example I saw one 50 yds or so away...do I make noise to make it go away? Or just wait until it leaves before attempting to hike by? Also thoughts on bear bells...do they work?
    Are you alive? All these good stories and great advice are for you and we haven't heard a word from you. One last piece of advice from me if all else fails and a aggressive bear comes at you and doesn't stop you must fight for your life. Grizzly is different but a black bear attacks you must be mentally ready to fight and do whatever it takes. There's a person who survived a bear attack by shoving their fist down the bears throat and the gag reflex made the bear let go. If you feel better carrying bear spray then carry it ,it would help with a crazy person attacking you as well. I like that old poster with the stork trying to swallow a frog and the frog is reaching out of the storks mouth and choking the stork preventing the stork from swallowing him. Titled never give up.

  18. #38
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    Lightbulb My statement needs to be re-worded

    i just read this article and not sure where you got "approached" from
    Permit me to give more detail on this statement.
    https://www.nj.gov/dep/fgw/pdf/bear/...ton_report.pdf
    This group of five were told specifically about an aggressive bear, and given the advice to leave the area.
    They instead went TOWARDS the bear, with hopes of encountering it.
    They did so, confirmed that it was aggressive (it almost immediately walked towards them), but they still did not leave the area.
    They then followed the "advice" of this "joke," and New Jersey had its first recorded bear fatality.

    I've had seven bear encounters while hiking solo on the A.T. In only one of them did the bear not immediately walk or run away.
    In that one, I left the area as soon as I heard the bear snort, which is bear talk for "Beat it!"
    I know enough to avoid aggressive bears and to NEVER RUN.
    Last edited by GoldenBear; 08-05-2020 at 23:47.

  19. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Durwood View Post
    Bluff charge any cubs, ring your bells, blow your whistle, blast bear spray into your own eyes then turn and run like your hair is on fire. JUST KIDDING-DO NOT DO THIS!!

    I'm a believer in slow, steady movements to appear big while being verbal.

    Once, on Tahoe Rim Trail (AT shakedown) I was treating water under some brush. Stream was only a few steps off trail but really compromised my situational awareness. After getting all gear set and adjusted I stepped out to the trail. Face to face (10 feet) with a HUGE black bear. I'm guessing he/she was going down to stream and I was clearly downwind. We were both startled and had an interminable stare down. I slowly raised my poles to the sky and shakily said, "hey bear, hey bear, easy there". This went on for like 4 hours...or 3 seconds, hard to say. I swear if a bear could roll it's eyes this one did. Turned very slowly, as if put off, and sauntered up the trail.

    Never even occurred to me to go for a pic...

    Ive experienced many other black bears in my vicinity after that encounter and have never witnessed any innate aggression. YMMV-read up on human/bear encounters and be safe!!
    My vote for best bear story! Lol, thanks...

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    Permit me to give more detail on this statement.
    https://www.nj.gov/dep/fgw/pdf/bear/...ton_report.pdf



    welllllllllllllllll..............

    i based my response from the link you have provided in the previous post......

    would have been nice to see this report instead of that other article as this one gives far more details....

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