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Thread: svea 123 fuel

  1. #41
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    Yes, but you can't actually buy one off the Optimus site.

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pheral View Post
    There are many e-tailers other than the big one that sell this stove, mostly in the range of $110 dollars or so.

    Thanks. It's curious, though, why Outland USA is not listed as a dealer on Optimus' web site (at least, not by searching by city/state or zip). REI is listed, but they don't carry this stove.

    Interesting it's not on the river site. IIRC it used to be, and there were (some) reviews complaining about it not being of the same quality etc etc. So I'm just cautious of the risk of knockoffs. I agree, Venchka, I could trust Optimus, but how do we know an Optimus is an Optimus? Best I can figure, by sticking to official dealers.

    There are, of course, other options in the white gas stove market. There's just something about the 123R that appeals to me - simplicity of design, longevity in the market, durability of item, retro appeal, etc. But it's my understanding they're not the most efficient things around. The attraction is not entirely rational, I concede!

  3. #43
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    I have my original Svea 123 I got from REI in 1975 for $11.25. I still runs like a blowtorch. As has been pointed out, White Gas (Coleman fuel) is the best fuel for it. On a 2.5 mos long hike on the AT in 1977 I did use leaded auto fuel for a bit until I could find some white gas to replenish my Sigg fuel bottle. I don't think auto fuel is ideal, but it certainly worked(s).

    I'm not sure it's been pointed out that the later version of the Svea 123 is the "R" model. It has a built-in cleaning needle. I've never owned the R model, but I've heard it's a bit more problematic than the original. I believe the current Taiwanese made version is the "R" model. In all the years I've used my Svea I've never had an issue with it, but I've always cleaned the burner jet religiously.

    If I wanted a Svea I'd get on ebay and find a used Swedish-made non-R model, though undoubtedly the 123R is perfectly fine.

    A lot of good reading:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Svea_123

  4. #44
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    After looking at EBAY SVEA stove and pump/fuel cap prices, I am putting my stove and accessories in a safety deposit box!
    👍😄
    My only regret: I bought the ďnakedĒ stove and SIGG TOURIST cook set package from REI. I donít have the brass windscreen. Maybe Iíll run across the windscreen someday.
    Wayne

  5. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by CalebJ View Post
    For what it's worth, I might use a dropper bottle with alcohol or white gas in it next time I dig mine out. Seems simpler, but either option would work just fine.
    I used a plastic eyedropper to transfer fuel from the COLD fuel tank to the priming cup. Just before it burns out, open the valve and the stove lights right up!
    " A good proofreader/editor, if they are doing their job properly, will really annoy an author!"

  6. #46
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    Interesting thread. I still have my Svea I started using over 40 years ago (credit to Colin Fletcher), and last time I used it, it still worked like a charm. I have two aluminum fuel bottles, large and small, which I've selected from based on the duration of a trip. As far as I can recall, I've always used Coleman fuel.

    Right now, I'm contemplating another attempt at the AT and have been trying to figure out how to manage a stove and fuel on a long trek. What is the availability of Coleman fuel (or something similar and suitable) along the trail? If not available, then it would seem like unleaded gasoline would be the next-best option, but I would rather use Ethanol-free gasoline, but, again, I don't have a good idea of the availability of that close to the trail.

    It looks like many of the newer models of stoves use gas cartridges, which should be able to be shipped as part of a resupply package. I'm not opposed to upgrading my equipment, but I'd rather not if stove fuel is available along the trail.

    John Meggers
    Naples, FL

  7. #47
    Registered User NY HIKER 50's Avatar
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    I had the 123 at one time but the way things went I had to give it up Try traveling on the subways and buses, trains with it. By the way, I used a dropper to prime it right out of the tank. Unfortunately, I had to switch to alcohol and esbit for the above safety reasons and because storage is now impossible of the fuel.

  8. #48

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    'It was somewhat common practice years ago. While it was cheaper, the problem was that auto gas would create deposits in the burner orifice and generator, requiring more frequent cleaning and often leading to stove failure in the field. Stove fuel (Coleman Fuel) is pretty much pure "light naphtha", like a heavier blend of Zippo lighter fluid.'
    Soo, it sounds like this doesn't feet any of generators, isn't it so?

  9. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by jmeg8237 View Post
    Interesting thread. I still have my Svea I started using over 40 years ago (credit to Colin Fletcher), and last time I used it, it still worked like a charm. I have two aluminum fuel bottles, large and small, which I've selected from based on the duration of a trip. As far as I can recall, I've always used Coleman fuel.

    Right now, I'm contemplating another attempt at the AT and have been trying to figure out how to manage a stove and fuel on a long trek. What is the availability of Coleman fuel (or something similar and suitable) along the trail? If not available, then it would seem like unleaded gasoline would be the next-best option, but I would rather use Ethanol-free gasoline, but, again, I don't have a good idea of the availability of that close to the trail.

    It looks like many of the newer models of stoves use gas cartridges, which should be able to be shipped as part of a resupply package. I'm not opposed to upgrading my equipment, but I'd rather not if stove fuel is available along the trail.

    John Meggers
    Naples, FL
    Years ago, when stoves like the Svea 123 were more prevalent, hostels would often Coleman fuel by the ounce. If you scroll down to the bar chart on the following link, a survey of AT thru-hikers in 2019 shows that only 2%-3% used liquid fuel (not counting alcohol), while 80+% used canister stoves. Based on supply and demand, I would think fuel canisters would be readily available, but probably not Coleman fuel.

    https://thetrek.co/appalachian-trail...-hiker-survey/

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