Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    07-07-2010
    Location
    Gainesville, GA
    Age
    61
    Posts
    6

    Default Yearly section starting at Culver’s Gap-need some info

    I will be starting at end of Sept. at Culver’s Gap and hope to make it to Graymoor. A few questions:
    -I usually throw all my gear into duffel bag and check my luggage with airline, leave in rental car while we hike (usually have another hiker plus non hiker friend along who helps with re-supply/rides to town/etc). Going solo this year. Could get rental or shuttle from airport. If shuttle, need suggestions on best way to handle backpack on plane. Not sure it would qualify as carry on. Not sure it would be safe to check. So may have to get rental.
    -Also, I am a once a year section hiker, so not in thru hiker shape! 10-12 days maybe. Trying to figure re-supply options in this stretch. I always use AWOL’s guide, but need advice on how easy/hard to get to those stores, decent motel along the way for laundry, etc.
    Thank you.

  2. #2

    Default

    Why not pick start and ending points easier to get to? Like Delaware Water Gap (bus from NYC) and stop at Bear Mountain where there are several shuttle people who can get you to public transportation. No sense pushing on the Graymoor as they no longer allow hikers on the property.

    Don't know about flying, I never fly I take Amtrak or a bus. I'm not sure of any COVID-19 restrictions which might apply, but do you really want to take the risk with it still out of control?
    Follow slogoen on Instagram.

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    07-07-2010
    Location
    Gainesville, GA
    Age
    61
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Appreciate the feedback Slo-go’en. I pick up where I left off the year before and try to hike as far as I can in the time I have, but will consider Bear Mtn. as ending point. If too many hurdles, may hold off till next year. Lots of logistics to work out.

  4. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-25-2019
    Location
    Ridgefield Park, New Jersey
    Posts
    2

    Default

    When did the Graymoor Friary stop allowing thru-hikers on their property? I know they stopped allowing in their building a long time ago, but the entire property?
    Last time I was on their property, it was on my 1st night of a hike from BM Inn to Pawling NY. I tented on the ridge above the Friary. I don't know whether I was actually on the Friary property, but I assume I was.
    At that time (I think it was about 5 years ago) I read in these forums that, while Friary was no longer permitting hikers inside, they still allowed us to use their grounds.
    I thought I was going to tent near the building, but the guy I was with decided to sleep on the ridge overlooking the grounds, so that is where I tented. I recall hearing the bells on the hour until midnight, but after that it was very quiet.

    If hikers are no longer allowed on The Friary property, the next tent site north would be Dennytown Road, which is 8.1 miles. The closest site to the south would be Hemlock Springs tentsite, which is 3 miles north of Bear Mountain Inn, but includes the steep climb from the BM bridge to the junction with the Camp Smith trail. Not a big deal, but if you're not in shape, it will take you an hour to climb that mountain.
    Hemlock Spring was not much of a tentsite. There is no privy, and only a few sites. It is noisy, with route 9D and the Metro North RR plus CSX on the west side of the river. Trains all night.
    There is the A.T. Deli, which is a good place to have a hot meal. I can only assume that the deli is still open. I haven't been there in five years.
    If you want to spend the money, there are a few motels in Fort Montgomery NY, just north of Bear Mountain Inn on U.S. route 9W.

    Bear Mountain Inn is a good ending point. There is a daily bus from there to NYC Port Authority bus terminal at 42nd st. From there, you can walk or take subway to Penn Station where you get Amtrak to anywhere.

    Ethan

  5. #5

    Default

    The notice is in the 2020 White Pages guide. Whether this started this year or earlier I do not know. I last stayed there, I think 4 years ago, at the ball field. The first time I stayed there in 1988, I actually stayed in a monk cell and had dinner with the Brothers - baloney sandwiches on white bread if I remember right
    Follow slogoen on Instagram.

  6. #6

    Default

    Backpacks can qualify as carry-on but may have some issues with what's inside them. For example, trekking poles, fuel containers (even empty and dry), knives, tent stakes, and other related gear common to backpacking are not allowed in cabin carry-on . Weight can be an issue (typically 22-pound limit), but most of the packs I have seen rejected from carry-on are due to being oversized of the airline size limitations (commonly 9-inch x 14-inch x 22 inch maximums). Packs exceeding these requirements are subject to carry-on denial and will be put in with luggage below. If gambling on this, it may be wise to have a cheap duffel bag with you to protect the pack if it has to go into the luggage hold.

    I usually ship my pack and gear to the hotel I plan on staying at when I get to the destination, I have not had any issues with this method though it adds some expense to the trip. I check with the hotel to be sure they hold it for my arrival and with confirm it's arrival after shipping. I usually arrange to keep the shipping box or duffel bag at the same hotel so I can ship the pack home, though it's sometimes easier to just purchase a new box from UPS or FedEx.

    If checking a bag with an airline, a cheap duffel bag to put the pack in so straps won't get hung up on things and lessens opportunity for anyone to poke around in your kit is a good idea. The only downside is the airline losing it which can happen but statistical data indicates it's unlikely. Be sure to remove any fuel containers and thoroughly clean the stove of fuel residue, which can lead to the bag being rejected.

    Good luck and have fun!

  7. #7
    Registered User
    Join Date
    07-07-2010
    Location
    Gainesville, GA
    Age
    61
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Thanks for the feedback!

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    07-07-2010
    Location
    Gainesville, GA
    Age
    61
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Thanks everyone.

  9. #9

    Default

    You currently would have to quarantine upon entering NY if coming from Georgia. https://coronavirus.health.ny.gov/co...ravel-advisory
    If you have traveled from within one of the designated states with significant community spread, you must quarantine when you enter New York for 14 days from the last travel within such designated state, provided on the date you enter into New York State that such state met the criteria for requiring such quarantine.
    (Unless you are just crossing into NY for less than 24 hours.) However much time you spent in NJ would effectively shave the 14 days down. However, NJ has the same list of restricted states but they only say you are expected to quarantine for 14 days. Given Georgia has been around fifth among the states for total cases, new cases, and cases per million, I wouldn't expect to see NY taking GA off that list anytime soon. CT is the same as NY and the New England states also have restrictions.
    "Sleepy alligator in the noonday sun
    Sleepin by the river just like he usually done
    Call for his whisky
    He can call for his tea
    Call all he wanta but he can't call me..."
    Robert Hunter & Ron McKernan

    Whiteblaze.net User Agreement.

  10. #10

    Default

    You could take the Metro North Port Jervis line from NYC to Port Jervis and ask Mosey (Mosey's Place hostel 845-239-3028) to shuttle you. As far as I know the bus route from NYC to West Point via Bear Mountain Inn is terminated due to Covid-19 but double check. You can return to NYC from Garrison on the Hudson Line (also Metro north). As far as I know, They allow hikers at Graymoor. Again, Double check and confirm; there are many changes because of the virus.

  11. #11

    Default

    I have a cheap duffel bag for flying with my backpack. I mailed it home from the hostel I stayed at before starting my thru hike.
    In Branchville on 206 there is a medium sized market called Dales--won't have backpacking food but probably enough for the first couple of days to Vernon. I usually put my food bag in the duffel and just get odds and ends. There are small motels nearby but it's not a compact trail town.
    Bigger challenge--fuel if you don't use Esbit. The fishing store in Lafayette village may have fuel. In Port Jervis Sawkill Creek Outfitters definitely does and the brewery around the corner is good. Owners of Fox N Hare Brewery love the AT
    If Mosey cannot help, let me know your schedule and I will see if I can help.
    It's a beautiful time of year to do this section.

++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •