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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Five Tango View Post
    I'm curious as to how or whether you put a closure on them as I have noticed that when I don't apply a closure I can compress the feathers and night clothes Significantly more and avoid having to hang stuff off of the pack.So when the weather is good I don't use a closure;never tried not closing tightly on a rainy day though.Thots?
    I pack my "dry" gear into the double bags in the pack, compress the gear into the pack to conform with the space and reduce loft, then fold and roll up the opening of each bag separately. That provides two different closures water would have to get into the pack and work it's way through. If there are no holes in the bag(s) the double seal has worked well for me over time.

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tipi Walter View Post
    I find these comments remarkable as I'm trying to imagine all my food just scattered loosely in my pack without putting any of it in a stuff sack.
    I never said I didn't use stuff sacks at all, only that I have stopped using them "by and large", a literary expression meaning "not as much/as many as I used to". I used to keep most everything in stuff sacks before realizing I needed a larger volume pack to carry it due to wasted space. I do have a couple of small stuff sacks for hygiene supplies, food/cooking (for approximately 3-4 days of meals), and an odds n' ends sack for commonly used items like sun glasses, sun block, bandaids, etc. are used but they are small and typically are the last items to go into the pack so they can be first out.

    There is a significant difference in being out for a few days versus several weeks, so it stands to reason there would be a significant difference in the type and amount of gear and provisions carried and how it is managed.

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Traveler View Post
    I pack my "dry" gear into the double bags in the pack, compress the gear into the pack to conform with the space and reduce loft, then fold and roll up the opening of each bag separately. That provides two different closures water would have to get into the pack and work it's way through. If there are no holes in the bag(s) the double seal has worked well for me over time.
    Thanks for the tip.I sorta do the same thing only I fold and stuff the left over bag length rather than roll it.

  4. #24
    Garlic
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    Quote Originally Posted by Traveler View Post
    I never said I didn't use stuff sacks at all, only that I have stopped using them "by and large", a literary expression meaning "not as much/as many as I used to"....
    An aside: "By and large" actually means "on the whole, everything considered." What's more interesting is that it's an old British nautical term. A ship can sail "by" (toward the wind), or "large" (away from the wind). Few old navy ships could do both well and a ship that could sail "by and large" was a good versatile ship.
    "Throw a loaf of bread and a pound of tea in an old sack and jump over the back fence." John Muir on expedition planning

  5. #25
    Garlic
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    I don't consider my food bag a "stuff sack." And the bag I use for small items of clothing is really my pillow in disguise.
    "Throw a loaf of bread and a pound of tea in an old sack and jump over the back fence." John Muir on expedition planning

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by garlic08 View Post
    I don't consider my food bag a "stuff sack." And the bag I use for small items of clothing is really my pillow in disguise.
    Why don't you consider your food bag a stuff sack? Isn't food stuffed into it?

    This could possibly be garlic08's food sack---


    HA HA HA just kidding. Actually it's Sgt Rock's foodsack on a trip to Slickrock Creek. (Just kidding. It's his bear throw line rock bag).

    TRIP 107 084-L.jpg
    Sgt Rock and son Matt on Slickrock Creek.

  7. #27
    GSMNP 900 Miler
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    Quote Originally Posted by Traveler View Post
    There is a significant difference in being out for a few days versus several weeks, so it stands to reason there would be a significant difference in the type and amount of gear and provisions carried and how it is managed.
    For the most part, I'd have to respectfully disagree...

    I've found very little difference in being out for a three-day weekend v a multi-week trip.
    Of course the one HUGE difference is planning for resupply of food, fuel, and toiletries.
    But otherwise, the only other difference is going to be a minor issue of clothing. For a multi-week trip, you need to pack clothing to handle the range of climate conditions you might face during your hike, where as for a week-end trip, you can likely leave a few articles of clothing at home based on the short term forecast.
    The only other difference I can recall is washing clothing while on the trail that I don't do for a weekend hike.

  8. #28
    GSMNP 900 Miler
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    Quote Originally Posted by Traveler View Post
    There is a significant difference in being out for a few days versus several weeks, so it stands to reason there would be a significant difference in the type and amount of gear and provisions carried and how it is managed.
    For the most part, I'd have to respectfully disagree...

    I've found very little difference in being out for a three-day weekend v a multi-week trip.
    Of course the one HUGE difference is planning for resupply of food, fuel, and toiletries.
    But otherwise, the only other difference is going to be a minor issue of clothing. For a multi-week trip, you need to pack clothing to handle the range of climate conditions you might face during your hike, where as for a week-end trip, you can likely leave a few articles of clothing at home based on the short term forecast.
    The only other difference I can recall is washing clothing while on the trail that I don't do for a weekend hike.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by HooKooDooKu View Post
    For the most part, I'd have to respectfully disagree...

    I've found very little difference in being out for a three-day weekend v a multi-week trip.
    Of course the one HUGE difference is planning for resupply of food, fuel, and toiletries.
    But otherwise, the only other difference is going to be a minor issue of clothing. For a multi-week trip, you need to pack clothing to handle the range of climate conditions you might face during your hike, where as for a week-end trip, you can likely leave a few articles of clothing at home based on the short term forecast.
    The only other difference I can recall is washing clothing while on the trail that I don't do for a weekend hike.
    Your post sort of ties into whether we bring stuff sacks or not. Personally, there's a big difference with a 3 day trip versus a 21 day trip---since personally I don't do resupplies which severely interrupt a wilderness trip---so my 21 day pack will be carrying 45+ lbs of food and fuel. All this food must be arranged and organized in stuff sacks---or bearvaults.

  10. #30
    ME => GA 19AT3 rickb's Avatar
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    Another difference is that the average daily carry weight of your food on a three day trip drops VERY rapidly.

    On a a longer trip, not so much.

    For some, that could impact food choices. Probably not TP Walter, though.

  11. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by rickb View Post
    Another difference is that the average daily carry weight of your food on a three day trip drops VERY rapidly.

    On a a longer trip, not so much.

    For some, that could impact food choices. Probably not TP Walter, though.
    A short 3 day trip means my food load is next to nothing and I probably won't even bring my stove and fuel. A 3 day trip generally means 2 cooked dinners---maybe hot breakfasts---and the rest no-cook snackables. What's weird about a long trip is by Day 19 I have your usual weekend 3-day pack weight.

  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tipi Walter View Post
    ...personally I don't do resupplies which severely interrupt a wilderness trip...
    That was part of what I LOVED about hiking the JMT out in California. You can resupply without really leaving the wilderness:

    Tuolumne Meadows store (Yosemite front country campground)
    Reds Meadows (front country campground near Devil's Postpile National Monument) - My 1st resupply
    Vermillion Valley Resort (a wilderness resort a few miles off the trail)
    Muir Trail Ranch (a wilderness resort almost right on the JMT) - My 2nd resupply
    Packers (hire Packers to meet you on the trail with your resupply)

  13. #33
    Registered User Crossup's Avatar
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    Stuff sacks all the way for me- I like knowing where things are and not having to dig around to find them.

    I carry 4 sacks for inside my backpack- cooking, electronics(tent and headlamp, MP3 player, spare AAA cells, charge cords and 10k mah Powerpack), hygiene/toiletry and lastly one for recreational equipment(I will let you figure out that one on your own). Outside its medkit under brain over, H20 treatment stuff(Sawyer w/flusher, Camelback hose adapter and Steripen) in brain top, cathole bag(trowel, TP, hand sanitizer) hung off carabiner.

    My Exos has the belt pockets so that gets bug repellent/sunblock and snacks.

    One of the first things I learned hiking the AT was how easy it is to loose things thru inattention- so everything has its place and it is therefore much easier to notice if something is NOT there. Along with that I do a strict, use it and replace it policy.

    When it comes time to break camp having only a small number of bags vs the much larger number of individual items makes things faster and smoother and has the side benefit of allowing constant packing layout.

    Now that I've laid out my reasons, I will admit by virtue of carrying more crap than most hikers I need more organization than most, so as always YMMV.

  14. #34

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    Like with any endeavor I suppose---perfect organization in backpacking comes with experience. It's one of the main keys to "successful" backpacking.

  15. #35
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    Interesting to see the different perspectives on loading a pack. I remember watching 2 thru-hiking SOBO's at Deer Park Shelter just south of Hot Springs loading up early one morning. One stashed everything in a roughly haphazard manner right straight into the pack; the other carefully organized and used his stuff sacks. I asked them for their reasons for doing it that way and both had their reasons. I guess it is something like everyone's bedroom looks different?? Some extremely neat and some unkempt? Maybe there is no co-relation, just curious.

  16. #36

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    I really like the packing cubes from Hyperlite Mountain Gear, they keep my backpack (and my tent) neat and organized. I used to stuff everything into a trash compactor bag but these are so much better. I was amazed how my diy quilt, clothes, and pillow fit into one of the cubes and love how the cubes nestle perfectly in my pack.

    (not affiliated with HMG)

    A99D6E9A-2EF1-4114-BB91-DC43BDC913B9.jpg

  17. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by HooKooDooKu View Post
    For the most part, I'd have to respectfully disagree...

    I've found very little difference in being out for a three-day weekend v a multi-week trip.
    Of course the one HUGE difference is planning for resupply of food, fuel, and toiletries.
    But otherwise, the only other difference is going to be a minor issue of clothing. For a multi-week trip, you need to pack clothing to handle the range of climate conditions you might face during your hike, where as for a week-end trip, you can likely leave a few articles of clothing at home based on the short term forecast.
    The only other difference I can recall is washing clothing while on the trail that I don't do for a weekend hike.
    My point was more directed at Tipi who carries perhaps one the heaviest pack known in the backpacking world and would require different sacks separation due to the volume of it. As you point out there is a difference of gear and volume of food one carries for a few days versus multiple days but it would not be as significant as it would for a month of weather changes without resupply.

  18. #38
    GSMNP 900 Miler
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crossup View Post
    One of the first things I learned hiking the AT was how easy it is to loose things thru inattention- so everything has its place and it is therefore much easier to notice if something is NOT there.
    That was my mantra while hiking the JMT.
    Once you start the trail, the only places to buy anything are the VERY limited stores of Tuolumne, Reds, VVR, and MTR... and they mainly concentrate on food and fuel, NOT gear.

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