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  1. #21
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    dogs are kids.

    they are brilliant, perfect, everyone should love them, and they should always get a+'s. they can do no wrong.

    my best one was when i was bitten and the dog owner finally arrived on the scene, acted like it was my fault, and showed me the unconnected leash in her hand as if it were some sort of justifying evidence.
    Last edited by cliffordbarnabus; 10-17-2020 at 11:00.

  2. #22

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    Sorry to hear of the dog bite, if not for the wound (which looks painful) and potential complications, but for the uneasy feeling that will present itself in similar circumstances from now on. FWIW, as a result of my experience I always keep a trekking pole between me and a dog regardless of protestations of owners with or without leash sense.

    The ATC has an incident reporting form that can be used to report incidents like dog bites (https://appalachiantrail.org/explore...basics/safety/). If nothing else this form should be filled out with details of the owner included and sent back to the ATC. I would share the report with the NPS, (or USFS if appropriate), and State Fish and Game. No clue if the owner will be followed up with, but NH does have a pretty serious "strict liability" dog responsibility law and I would suspect at least one of these agencies will make owner contact.

    Everyone caught speeding claims they never do it, everyone who's dog bites someone claims it never happened before. This can be a very serious issue as dog bites can transmit bacteria and potential illness the dog not show symptoms of but can cause problems down the road for people. I would not take anyone's word their dog has been properly vaccinated, though I would accept a Vet's email detailing the vaccination history.

    You are a good guy and may be thinking this was not such a big deal and reporting this may cause the owner some inconvenience. Unfortunately if there are no ramifications the dog will be dragged along on other hikes to repeat it's behavior and the claim "It's never done that before" will be heard again. But, the dog does bite and probably should not be on trails at all. Your action here will document the dog's behavior, may cause the owner some minor inconvenience and perhaps a small amount of money, and may prevent the dog biting someone else on a trail, perhaps a child who may be scarred for life as a result.

  3. #23
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    USFS has very very few LEOs. If you call the Forest Service they usually ask for help from the County.
    Be Prepared

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by stephanD View Post
    I think every hiker as a dog story. Mine happened in 2017. I finished a section hike from Newfound Gap to Springer and I started going down the approach trail. Then I see two huge dogs, one pitch black, one kind of brownish slowly approaching towards me. we all stopped when they were about 10-15 feet away from each other. They started growling and I raised my hiking poles expecting an attack. We stayed like this for a long minute, watching each other, until the owner showed up and called the dogs. His attitude was like "what's the big deal" and he nonchalantly continued his way up the trail.
    If threatened like that it is reasonable to draw a firearm on the dog(s) [not the owner]. Owner attitude might be very different at seeing their precious property in danger.
    Be Prepared

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by JNI64 View Post
    Not to come off like a Rambo, macho,tough guy, wanna be but. I had problems with some dogs in my past and had real concerns for my safety. So I got some advice from a highly respected friend of mine in the self protection field. Here was his advice against real threatening dog attack. If you have a stick or hiking pole as the dog advances stick it in his mouth they don't have great vision this way like cross eyed, but let the dog take the stick than jam it straight down their throat and don't stop. If you don't have a stick take your shirt off or jacket wrap it around your forearm and let the attacking dog take your protected arm. Then take your other arm around the back of their neck and snap back breaking the neck. Dogs necks don't go backwards like ours. I offer this advice so it may save someone someday.
    Good advice but I really don't want to go "hands on" with an animal. You may win, but unlikely you would escape uninjured. I would prefer defense at a distance, say with bear spray or firearm.
    Be Prepared

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by peakbagger View Post
    Unless its a Covid puppy, the "OMG my dog has never done anything like this" is usually BS. Folks with scared /aggressive dogs usually seem to be blind to their dogs issues. My guess is by the time they got back to the car it was your fault. Just call 911 and let them sort it out on jurisdiction.
    I had a couple tell me after their handsome Golden Retriever,of all things,lunged at me while on leash that the dog did not like my balaclava and hat ensemble.Sorry,my bad..................

  7. #27
    Registered User ldsailor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Five Tango View Post
    I had a couple tell me after their handsome Golden Retriever,of all things,lunged at me while on leash that the dog did not like my balaclava and hat ensemble.Sorry,my bad..................
    Thus making it your fault, and therein lies the crux of the problem. I wonder if it ever occurred to the owners to maybe not bring their dog to a trail where people might be wearing hats and balaclavas?
    Trail Name - Slapshot
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  8. #28

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    I once had an encounter with a junk yard dog as I got out of my car to go seek the owner of the junk yard. The dog came out from around the front of my car fiercly barking, growling and showing it's very large teeth as if to kill me. I immediately started yelling at it to go lay down, I yelled as loud as I could repeatedly....go lay down!!! yelling at it as if I were it's owner. The dog retreated a bit as it swirled in a turnaround fashion as if unsure of what was happening. At that point I turned around and opened my car door, jumped in, closed the window and gave a huge sigh of relief. I did learn a lesson that day. The owner of the junk yard never show up and I drove away in haste :-)

    In a local forest preserve park while jogging I was bitten in the heel by one of 3 dogs not on a leash. Dogs belonged to an elderly couple out for a walk. They appologised and tried to put the dogs on a leash as fast as they could. Lesson learned........when I see people approching with dog on or off leash I STOP and remain motionless until dog and people/person passes me. I no longer trust dogs. I don't want to be bitten again.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Slo-go'en View Post
    Got bit by a day hiker dog

    Going up the Imp trail for a 2 night hike on the AT. 1/2 mile from the ridge line, I see a couple with a dog coming down. It's a steep and narrow trail at that point. The dog sees me and comes running at me while barking. Owner calls the dog back and after 3-4 tries, it finally returns and gets leashed. I don't know what type it was, on the small size and looked like one of those high strung designer dogs they probably paid a breeder a bundle for.

    I approach and they move off the trail as much as can be, which wasn't much at that point, barely enough room to pass. I stop for a second before going by and the dog sniffs my feet and seems to be okay, but as I pass, it lunges and nips the side of my leg. "OMG she's never done anything like that before, I'm so sorry" Not as sorry as I am. Got a first aid kit and what's your contact info?

    Thankfully, it was just a flesh wound, enough to bruise and bleed a little. It didn't impact my hiking for the rest of the trip, but what a way to start.

    Attachment 46817
    This is usually a lie in my experience. I love dogs. Always was able to calm any dog. Walked around a corner one day in a building and a dog woke up, jumped up, and latched onto my arm. I was told "first time this ever happened." Owner paid my doctor bill. Later on, I learned I was at LEAST the THIRD person this dog had bit!
    https://tinyurl.com/MyFDresults

    A vigorous five-mile walk will do more good for an unhappy but otherwise healthy adult than all the medicine and psychology in the world. ~Paul Dudley White

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Slo-go'en View Post
    Well, it happened on National Forest land in an unincorporated territory and the owners live in MA, so who does it get reported to? If it had resulted in my needing stiches and a rescue to get off the mountain, that would be a different story and in the news.
    Report the incident in the town the dog resides. maybe locally as well. but definitely to the dog licensing officer in their town of residence.
    https://tinyurl.com/MyFDresults

    A vigorous five-mile walk will do more good for an unhappy but otherwise healthy adult than all the medicine and psychology in the world. ~Paul Dudley White

  11. #31

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    I have not tried this on the trail as every dog I have encountered has been "nice" - and I don't approach them without asking the owner if it's OK - but may I suggest this? When I was riding a bike a lot, and during the Bicycle Ride Across GA (BRAG Ride), we were told that the best way to deter a dog that was barking at and running with our bike was to take our water bottle out and give a quick squirt of water to the face. Not necessarily to the eyes, but just the face. It kinda startles the dog, and they back off. They aren't hurt by it, and I have used it many times, and it always worked for me. This was a "biker's" water bottle, the kind that squirts water into your mouth from a nozzle, so those of you who use the other kinds of hydration systems wouldn't necessarily have one handy, but you might consider carrying a small squirt gun or bottle just for this purpose. It's a kinder way to handle the dog and it might avert a bite from the dog and a grouchy encounter from the owner.

  12. #32
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
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    Lol, a small squirt gun that shoots water lol......

  13. #33

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    I think some posters here are missing the point IMO. And that is it is incumbent on the dog owner to make sure the dog doesn't harm another. There are times when people don't see the attack coming before it happens. The owners need to keep a tight leash.
    https://tinyurl.com/MyFDresults

    A vigorous five-mile walk will do more good for an unhappy but otherwise healthy adult than all the medicine and psychology in the world. ~Paul Dudley White

  14. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by PennyPincher View Post
    This is usually a lie in my experience. I love dogs. Always was able to calm any dog. Walked around a corner one day in a building and a dog woke up, jumped up, and latched onto my arm. I was told "first time this ever happened." Owner paid my doctor bill. Later on, I learned I was at LEAST the THIRD person this dog had bit!
    That is a lawsuit you are 100% winning.
    Be Prepared

  15. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trailweaver View Post
    I have not tried this on the trail as every dog I have encountered has been "nice" - and I don't approach them without asking the owner if it's OK - but may I suggest this? When I was riding a bike a lot, and during the Bicycle Ride Across GA (BRAG Ride), we were told that the best way to deter a dog that was barking at and running with our bike was to take our water bottle out and give a quick squirt of water to the face. Not necessarily to the eyes, but just the face. It kinda startles the dog, and they back off. They aren't hurt by it, and I have used it many times, and it always worked for me. This was a "biker's" water bottle, the kind that squirts water into your mouth from a nozzle, so those of you who use the other kinds of hydration systems wouldn't necessarily have one handy, but you might consider carrying a small squirt gun or bottle just for this purpose. It's a kinder way to handle the dog and it might avert a bite from the dog and a grouchy encounter from the owner.
    As a cyclist I can second this. My cycling partner has done this several times. We have also learned that raising something as if to throw it gets the dog's attention.
    Be Prepared

  16. #36
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
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    Oh ok sorry for laughing at your suggestion .

  17. #37

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    Long story,but I once owned a fairly aggressive dog.I kept him muzzled in public,he could open his mouth just fine in the "box" muzzle but could not bite anybody.FTR,I would never own another aggressive animal-period-not worth the hassle.......The day I almost got nailed by the Golden Retriever,I also had a scary encounter with a beautiful white German Shepherd.I'm gonna rethink my balaclava and hat ensemble next cold day I spend on a busy trail.....But all dog owners that feel the need to take their dog on trail would be well advised to muzzle them.
    Last edited by Five Tango; 10-19-2020 at 18:41.

  18. #38
    A proper quick, brave, steady, ready gentleman! ocourse's Avatar
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    That's life. No real harm done. Animals are sometimes unpredictable Hike on!.
    I've learned....
    That a smile is an inexpensive way to improve your looks.

  19. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by ocourse View Post
    That's life. No real harm done. Animals are sometimes unpredictable Hike on!.
    No great harm done, but I'll wear the scare for some time, something I could have done without. This incident was unpredictable, but next time I'll make sure there's more distance between me and a dog, even if the trail is only 3 feet wide and there's no way to step off it at that point.

    The number of people hiking with dogs has exploded over the last couple of years and with COVID, it seems to have gotten even worse. While the majority of dogs are just fine, there are some which aren't and you can't always tell which are which.
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