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  1. #61
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    I just use one if my solid fuel tabs (from Esbit type stove). Of course after i have gathered adequate fuel, found or cleared a dirt patch (do NOT build fire on top of anything except rock or dirt).

  2. #62
    Registered User 2Hobbits's Avatar
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    Take cotton balls and stuff them in a mini Nalgene bottle. Pour denatured alcohol over then until they are saturated. Put the top back on. Done. I use a wood burning Zip stove to cook on in all weather. Pick up small dry pieces on your hike. If it’s pouring I will wait till I get to a shelter. There’s always scraps of wood around and underneath them. One of those alcohol soaked cotton balls burn long and hot enough to start a fire. If it is rain TO bad, I set up a tarp to redirect the rain. It works just need a Bic.

  3. #63

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    Saw a guy just use his Jetboil as a blow torch one cold rainy evening in Maine. Not very elegant, but got the fire going to the appreciation of everyone staying in Sabbath Pond Shelter that night.

    Agree that most of the time not worth the trouble.

  4. #64
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
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    I wonder how well that new mega flashlight/ Firestarter thing works?
    Op never responded back either fell off the face of the earth or didn't like our ideas?

  5. #65
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
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    And of course I'm hoping for the ladder....

  6. #66
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
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    Or is it the latter ?

  7. #67
    Registered User somers515's Avatar
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    Interesting thread! I didn't see anyone mention dryer lint as a decent fire starter but I may have missed it. At home I use it to help start my firepit fires and when backpacking I usually bring some in a small ziplock bag with my matches. It's super light and gives you a good start. Of course collecting your initial dry thin pieces of wood before you try to start your fire is also key. I second the suggestions to start with a little birch bark that is already just kind of hanging off a tree or the very small dead thin branches under an evergreen tree is usually great stuff for the initial start of your fire.
    LT End-to-Ender 2017; NH 48/48 2015-2021; 8 of 159usForests.com
    "The clearest way into the Universe is through a forest wilderness." - John Muir

  8. #68

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    Birch bark is a great starter, but please only collect it from the ground. Weather and animal contact provide scraps near most birch trees. Peeling it from trees is bad for them. It is sad to see trees near established camps that have been peeled bare. This leaves the tree open to infestation and leads to its early demise. Pick some up in late afternoon along the trail or search a bit farther afield in camp, but don't pull it off of standing trees.
    “The man who goes alone can start today; but he who travels with another must wait until that other is ready...”~Henry David Thoreau

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  9. #69
    Registered User somers515's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LoneStranger View Post
    Birch bark is a great starter, but please only collect it from the ground. Weather and animal contact provide scraps near most birch trees. Peeling it from trees is bad for them. It is sad to see trees near established camps that have been peeled bare. This leaves the tree open to infestation and leads to its early demise. Pick some up in late afternoon along the trail or search a bit farther afield in camp, but don't pull it off of standing trees.
    Sure if I see some on the ground I would always take that first instead of off the tree. But perhaps I'm not describing it right, I'm talking about birch bark that is basically just hanging by a thread off of the tree - I can't imagine that its doing the tree any harm if I carefully remove just the part that's hanging. Did I describe what I'm talking about better this time? I'm not talking about peeling a tree bare. But if you have a source that you'd like to share that removing the part that is hanging is still bad I'm willing to learn.
    LT End-to-Ender 2017; NH 48/48 2015-2021; 8 of 159usForests.com
    "The clearest way into the Universe is through a forest wilderness." - John Muir

  10. #70

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    Quote Originally Posted by somers515 View Post
    Sure if I see some on the ground I would always take that first instead of off the tree. But perhaps I'm not describing it right, I'm talking about birch bark that is basically just hanging by a thread off of the tree - I can't imagine that its doing the tree any harm if I carefully remove just the part that's hanging. Did I describe what I'm talking about better this time? I'm not talking about peeling a tree bare. But if you have a source that you'd like to share that removing the part that is hanging is still bad I'm willing to learn.

    Wasn't calling you out and you are welcome to do as you please. I just hate to see peeled trees, which I see often at established camps here in New England. When I see people talking about birch bark I like to bring up the idea of picking up a piece on trail. Planting the seed of an idea that may save a tree later costs me just a moment. Again, wasn't anything to do with you, so please don't take my comment personally.
    “The man who goes alone can start today; but he who travels with another must wait until that other is ready...”~Henry David Thoreau

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  11. #71

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    Fire starting was easier years ago, when most stoves used Coleman fuel.

  12. #72
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
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    Seen I guy one time at a shelter catch his arm on fire with heet!
    Said he wouldn't be doing that again!

  13. #73
    Registered User somers515's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LoneStranger View Post
    Wasn't calling you out and you are welcome to do as you please. I just hate to see peeled trees, which I see often at established camps here in New England. When I see people talking about birch bark I like to bring up the idea of picking up a piece on trail. Planting the seed of an idea that may save a tree later costs me just a moment. Again, wasn't anything to do with you, so please don't take my comment personally.
    Glad to hear it LoneStranger! I share your concern about a peeled birch trees near established camps and I should have been more clear in my original post. I always try to leave any area a little nicer, and certainly no worse off, than I found it. Happy hiking to you!
    LT End-to-Ender 2017; NH 48/48 2015-2021; 8 of 159usForests.com
    "The clearest way into the Universe is through a forest wilderness." - John Muir

  14. #74
    Registered User hikermiker's Avatar
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    Fires are not necessary unless you want to sing Kum By Yah
    https://pmags.com/to-not-build-a-fire

  15. #75

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    Perhaps I am more in the ultimate hiker than ultimate camper group. I am always too tired at the end of the day to think about starting a fire.

    Although I will admit I did appreciate the ones in the GSMP shelters when it was below freezing in March.

  16. #76

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    Quote Originally Posted by Astro View Post
    Perhaps I am more in the ultimate hiker than ultimate camper group. I am always too tired at the end of the day to think about starting a fire.

    Although I will admit I did appreciate the ones in the GSMP shelters when it was below freezing in March.
    Despite carrying my twig stove and camping at established sites with fire rings most nights I never lit a fire on my LT thru this year. Totally agree about sitting down being more important than fire after a long hard day. Fires are for camping trips, not hiking, in my mind.

    On the other hand, I did enjoy warming a pop tart after dinner over a fire someone lit at a shelter
    “The man who goes alone can start today; but he who travels with another must wait until that other is ready...”~Henry David Thoreau

    http://lesstraveledby.net
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  17. #77

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    Quote Originally Posted by JNI64 View Post
    Seen I guy one time at a shelter catch his arm on fire with heet!
    Said he wouldn't be doing that again!
    Not a big deal if the burning area is small enough to smother with one hand and you notice it immediately.
    Hot water, hot ramen, burning alcohol, all in my lap

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