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  1. #1

    Default Hiking in Muck Boots

    Anyone with experience here?
    Trail Miles: 4,007.6 - AT Trips: 70
    AT Map 1: 2004.8
    AT Map 2: 265.0
    Sheltowee Trace Map: 84.0
    BMT Map: 57.7
    Pinhoti Trail Map: 0.0

  2. #2
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    Default

    I don't know Gambit. I haven't seen other hikers wearing them. Somebody might think you were a newbie or somethin'.

  3. #3
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    Heavy, not very durable, not really made for long hikes.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

  4. #4
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
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    You want mukluks like shug wears in Minnesota at -40 .

  5. #5
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    I think you'd be much better off with a pair of water proof treated leather or synthetic hiking boots.

    Muck boots have their place, but they don't provide enough support to be comfortable for a long hike.

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by illabelle View Post
    I don't know Gambit. I haven't seen other hikers wearing them. Somebody might think you were a newbie or somethin'.
    I am a newbie...or somethin'
    Trail Miles: 4,007.6 - AT Trips: 70
    AT Map 1: 2004.8
    AT Map 2: 265.0
    Sheltowee Trace Map: 84.0
    BMT Map: 57.7
    Pinhoti Trail Map: 0.0

  7. #7
    Registered User SoaknWet's Avatar
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    Only it they're steel toed.

  8. #8

    Default

    I spent a couple years (1982-83) backpacking in Sorel pack boots and while warm and mostly waterproof they are CLUNKY to hike in and just slowed me down. Great for living outdoors in the winter, not so great for long term backpacking.

    Plus, a forgotten fact---These rubber type boots can cause bad toe infections over time as the feet don't breathe.

  9. #9
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    Default

    i say if you like to hike in them, knowing all the pro's and con's, who gets a rat's butt what other people think........

  10. #10

    Default

    I should have added:
    Distance: around 30 miles
    Duration:2.5-3 days
    Season: Strictly winter
    Trail Miles: 4,007.6 - AT Trips: 70
    AT Map 1: 2004.8
    AT Map 2: 265.0
    Sheltowee Trace Map: 84.0
    BMT Map: 57.7
    Pinhoti Trail Map: 0.0

  11. #11
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
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    Gambit Google mukluk and look at the men's arctic.
    Shug said at -40 he had two pairs of socks on and had cold feet ,but then he looked at the recommended way to wear them from mukluk and they said one pair recommended, he took one pair off and was toasty warm sitting around camp at -40 .
    And he says they're nice to hike in with snowshoeing and spikes

  12. #12
    Registered User soilman's Avatar
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    I have a pair of the chore model pictured above. I wear them in the rain and snow on the trail on my property when I walk the dogs. I only hike about 1 mile. I would not want to wear them with a pack and for a long distance. They do not fit as well as a pair of hiking shoes/boots.
    More walking, less talking.

  13. #13

    Default

    I've done about 60 miles total in Orkney and Caithness in wellies, but only because walking conditions required them.
    Teej

    "[ATers] represent three percent of our use and about twenty percent of our effort," retired Baxter Park Director Jensen Bissell.

  14. #14
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    Default

    How about bunny boots ?

    thom

  15. #15

    Default

    i've hunted in them, after a couple of miles of walking i wish i had something else on my feet

  16. #16

    Default

    We used to put Sno-Seal on leather boots.

  17. #17
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cheyou View Post
    How about bunny boots ?

    thom
    Wasn't familiar had to Google. Good enough for the US Armed Forces!!

  18. #18

    Default

    Keeping an eye on footgear, like Illabele I have not seen any hikers wearing this type of footgear especially on long hikes, but experimentation is in the hiker DNA.

    FWIW, my experience with this kind of boot is after about a half mile of rough ground walking they get too clunky and seem to find all kinds of things to stumble or scuff trip on and became too uncomfortable to serve much purpose in hiking. I find they are best used as "chore boots" in water and mud environments.

  19. #19
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    Default

    Had been on a short visit to Sweden mid-October this year, and intended to do a 2-3 days hike in the mountains.
    When I was on-site up the mountains, I skipped the idea of hiking due to the conditions: Water everywhere and in any possible condition, swamp, mud, rivers, ponds and lakes, dew, snow&ice, trails going straight through puddles balacing on planks half-drowned, and so on.
    I had my usual leather desert boots and have been totally soaked after just 2 hrs walking.
    Met other hikers who did short daytrips wearing rubber boots of all kinds.
    Later we went to a sport shop and the shelfs were full of all kind of waterproof boots, ranging from cheap worker-style rubber boots to full blown Lundhags.

    If I was to go hiking up there sometimes, I'd go and get some Lundhags or similar.
    I'd never intend to do real hiking in worker-style rubber boots.

  20. #20

    Default

    Well, if your mucking out a dairy barn, those boots are the thing to get.
    Follow slogoen on Instagram.

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