Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 35
  1. #1
    Registered User searust's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-08-2011
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Age
    55
    Posts
    34

    Default Shipping backpack

    Look like I will need to ship my pack to Amicalola falls or someplace in Georgia. I'm sure this is a regular issue, but is there a known place to ship? Is this a regular thing?

  2. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by searust View Post
    Look like I will need to ship my pack to Amicalola falls or someplace in Georgia. I'm sure this is a regular issue, but is there a known place to ship? Is this a regular thing?
    Here is my 2 cents

    Buy a old military duffle, put your pack in it and check it with the airline your traveling with. Once in GA just through the duffle away or give to the shuttle driver to repurpose for another hiker.

    Or possibly see if you can mail the pack to your shuttle driver for them to have for you upon pickup. FWIW I have only flown for about 8-10 hikes but I have always taken my pack to the airport. I have carried my kit on the plane, and I have checked it. I have never mailed my pack.
    Trail Miles: 4,007.6 - AT Trips: 70
    AT Map 1: 2004.8
    AT Map 2: 265.0
    Sheltowee Trace Map: 84.0
    BMT Map: 57.7
    Pinhoti Trail Map: 0.0

  3. #3

    Default

    I'd use UPS or FedX. If you mailed a pack it could take weeks to get there. A package that size and weight would go parcel post. Don't know where you'd ship it to though. Many motels will accept packages for guests. Maybe the Lodge at Amicalola?

    Looks like you could take Amtrak from Auston to Atlanta or Gainesville. While this will take an extra day, you don't have to deal with airport BS and restrictions on what can fly.
    Follow slogoen on Instagram.

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Slo-go'en View Post
    I'd use UPS or FedX. If you mailed a pack it could take weeks to get there. A package that size and weight would go parcel post. Don't know where you'd ship it to though. Many motels will accept packages for guests. Maybe the Lodge at Amicalola?

    Looks like you could take Amtrak from Auston to Atlanta or Gainesville. While this will take an extra day, you don't have to deal with airport BS and restrictions on what can fly.
    I have never found the airport to be so burdensome that I would spend an extra day traveling to avoid it.
    Trail Miles: 4,007.6 - AT Trips: 70
    AT Map 1: 2004.8
    AT Map 2: 265.0
    Sheltowee Trace Map: 84.0
    BMT Map: 57.7
    Pinhoti Trail Map: 0.0

  5. #5
    GSMNP 900 Miler
    Join Date
    02-25-2007
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Age
    54
    Posts
    4,644
    Journal Entries
    1
    Images
    5

    Default

    When I did the JMT, I Gambit's idea to place it in a duffle bag I got from the Thrift store and checked it as luggage.
    When I finished the trail, I went to a local grocery store and bought some saran wrap and wrapped all the straps down (making sure the main compartment could still be opened in case airport security wanted to go thru it) and simply checked it again.

  6. #6
    Registered User ldsailor's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-25-2016
    Location
    St. Petersburg, FL
    Age
    71
    Posts
    689

    Default

    I have traveled a lot to places I want to hike, the latest being the Colorado Trail. I a buy $17 duffle bag from Walmart and put my pack inside. When I get to my destination, I either throw the duffle bag out, give it to a shuttle driver if I use one, or depending on cost, mail it ahead on the trail. It always works. I guarantee you, freight to mail, UPS, etc a backpack will exceed the cost of the duffle.
    Trail Name - Slapshot
    "One step at a time."
    Blog - www.tonysadventure.com

  7. #7
    Registered User searust's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-08-2011
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Age
    55
    Posts
    34

    Default

    Actually looked at Amtrak... 3 days, and 3 times the cost of a plane ticket... would have to leave a week early...nope.

    I think the big duffle is the idea. I hike with a white gas stove so I will leave this all taken apart.

    I'm a photographer, so I actually have a couple large bags for lighting equipment. I'll sacrifice one for the cause!

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-25-2010
    Location
    Newark, DE
    Age
    60
    Posts
    78
    Images
    20

    Default

    I flew into Atlanta when I did the southernmost section of the trail and checked my pack as luggage. I didn't put it inside another bag but If I remember correctly the airline had a big plastic bag they wrapped it in. Of course I couldn't pack any flammables but when I got to Atlanta, the shuttle driver sold me a fuel canister. I also checked my pack as luggage for my return flight out of Asheville. Both times, the pack made it through with no problems.

  9. #9

    Default

    You can mail it to a Post Office that accepts general delivery and pick it up during their business hours. I believe UPS allows shipping packages to CVS and FedEx to walgreens. Something to look into. Alot of hotels will allow you to ship packages to them if you have a reservation; you should call first before shipping to verify any requirements they have. If you are using a shuttle service, some drivers may allow you to ship your gear to them ahead of time with a reservation. You should contact them.

    I have personally mailed my gear to hostels and local Post Offices to avoid flying with it, worrying about items being wrongly confiscated by TSA, stolen by handlers, or damaged when checked in.

  10. #10

    Default

    Trains are greener
    But yeah slower, and if you book late, pricey.
    Last edited by HankIV; 01-06-2021 at 17:57. Reason: Forgot to add second line

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by searust View Post
    Actually looked at Amtrak... 3 days, and 3 times the cost of a plane ticket... would have to leave a week early...nope.

    I think the big duffle is the idea. I hike with a white gas stove so I will leave this all taken apart.

    I'm a photographer, so I actually have a couple large bags for lighting equipment. I'll sacrifice one for the cause!
    Your right about the train. They have you go to Chicago first, then back south. That's insane since the short route is through New Orleans. This new web site format is horrible too, they don't show the prices.
    Follow slogoen on Instagram.

  12. #12
    Registered User colorado_rob's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-20-2012
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Age
    64
    Posts
    4,485
    Images
    3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by searust View Post
    Look like I will need to ship my pack to Amicalola falls or someplace in Georgia. I'm sure this is a regular issue, but is there a known place to ship? Is this a regular thing?
    I guess it is a regular thing for folks without a lot of experience flying with their backpack, which with all due modesty, I do; I've flown all over the world, dozens of trips simply checking my backpack, never any issue whatsoever.

    folks will say all sorts of things on here about the "dangers of checking a backpack", but I truly believe people are mostly just expressing their own fears, or making up stories about how checking a backpack was a mistake they had made (damage, theft, loss, etc).

    sure there is a finite chance of a bad thing happening, but if you take care when checking your pack, the odds are tiny that a bad thing will happen.

    make SURE the bag check-tag they put on you pack has the correct destination city
    make sure you name and number are clearly shown on you pack somehow (tag).

    If you do these two things there is virtually no way your pack will be lost.

    Damage: I guarantee you, a couple days on the trail will do more wear/tear to your pack than checking your pack. Still, I do buckle both the waist belt and sternum strap around the back of the pack and I wrap that packing plastic around the whole thing. Pic below shows what I mean about the buckles.

    So, lots will argue, and some will make up stories, whatever, but easiest thig to do is to just check the darn thing, avoid all these hassles (shipping, cheap duffels, whatever).

    ALL of the above being said, I do carry on my electronics, jacket, $600 tent and $500 quilt on the airplane (in a small plastic grocery sack) and I'm wearing all of my hiking clothes and shoes. Yeah, this is a bit inconsistent with what I've said above, but in the infinitesimal chance that the airline loses my pack, at least I still have my most expensive gear and the total loss is within what the airline will reimburse me for (what is it these days, $1500?) and it would take me minimal time to replace stuff and start the hike. Again though, practically zero chance, maybe less of a chance that losing a pack that is shipped.

    One extra little tidbit: sometime relatively recently, TSA (Thousands Standing Around!) has started frowning on, and thoroughly inspecting food carried on; I have now switched to checking my starting food rather than carrying it on, just to avoid the TSA hassle.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  13. #13

    Default

    @Colorado_Rob
    I know for a while TSA was asking that all food be removed from carry on luggage while going through security and the scanners. I think the signs are still posted. However, I never really had them "inspect" it and after the 2nd time of dealing with that hassle I just stopped taking it out. No one ever bothered to say anything. After all, what's the point of using a carry on if half or more of your stuff needs to come out of the carry on?! I already (when doing normal travel) have to remove my laptop, kindle, phone, and shoes. I always carry my own snacks and sometimes a whole meal depending on what I have in the fridge just before going on travel. I love to bring avocados with me even if I plan on getting a salad at the airport for lunch/dinner. If questioned I just reply I have a "special diet" and no one cares.
    https://tinyurl.com/MyFDresults

    A vigorous five-mile walk will do more good for an unhappy but otherwise healthy adult than all the medicine and psychology in the world. ~Paul Dudley White

  14. #14
    Registered User
    Join Date
    10-17-2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Age
    61
    Posts
    4,835

    Default

    Make sure the bag is long enough to hold trekking poles, if you have them. They can not be taken on the plane. Curiously, matches can be carried on but not checked. You already know fuel has to be purchased on arrival.

  15. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Odd Man Out View Post
    Make sure the bag is long enough to hold trekking poles, if you have them. They can not be taken on the plane. Curiously, matches can be carried on but not checked. You already know fuel has to be purchased on arrival.
    I put rubber tips on my trekking poles, collapse them down, and then carry them on with me. Haven't done it in a few years but had no problem the last time.
    https://tinyurl.com/MyFDresults

    A vigorous five-mile walk will do more good for an unhappy but otherwise healthy adult than all the medicine and psychology in the world. ~Paul Dudley White

  16. #16

    Default

    On a couple of trips that involved flight, I have gone to REI and they will give you a box from a backpack. I put the pack, poles, and canisters in the box and UPS it to the location.

    I confirm in advance that the receiver is willing to accept a large box and hold it until I arrive. I always tip them when I pick it up.

    I write my info in very large letters on the box "Hold for Stephen Katz - Arriving March 15"

    I don't disagree with the other method of the checked duffel, just offering another option.
    The older I get, the faster I hiked.

  17. #17
    Registered User
    Join Date
    10-17-2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Age
    61
    Posts
    4,835

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PennyPincher View Post
    I put rubber tips on my trekking poles, collapse them down, and then carry them on with me. Haven't done it in a few years but had no problem the last time.
    There are different opinions and experiences with this. But there are a few facts that are not opinions.

    1. The TSA specifically says the hiking poles are not allowed on as carry on items.
    https://www.tsa.gov/travel/security-...s/hiking-poles

    2. When you get to the security check, there is only one opinion that matters. If the guard decides to follow there rules, you will either throw your poles away or turn around and possibly miss your flight.

    3. You get to decide if you would rather throw them away or miss your flight.

  18. #18
    Registered User
    Join Date
    06-30-2015
    Location
    Freedom, New Hampshire
    Age
    55
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by colorado_rob View Post
    I guess it is a regular thing for folks without a lot of experience flying with their backpack, which with all due modesty, I do; I've flown all over the world, dozens of trips simply checking my backpack, never any issue whatsoever.
    folks will say all sorts of things on here about the "dangers of checking a backpack", but I truly believe people are mostly just expressing their own fears, or making up stories about how checking a backpack was a mistake they had made (damage, theft, loss, etc).
    Years ago I had checked a bag that was never found on non-stop flight from Boston to O'Hare. I believe I got $1350 from American Airlines, which is the maximum they would pay. Today it appears it's a $3500 maximum. That flight that my bag went missing from was before 9/11, I would hope that the additional airport security today would also make it much harder for baggage to disappear from secured areas. I've flown over half a million miles in my lifetime and that was my only bad experience, although I generally tried to avoid checking luggage. I would probably just check my pack with a portion of my gear inside it, if I was flying to Atlanta now.

  19. #19
    Registered User
    Join Date
    12-19-2005
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    3,664
    Images
    3

    Default

    2. When you get to the security check, there is only one opinion that matters. If the guard decides to follow there rules, you will either throw your poles away or turn around and possibly miss your flight.

    what if one claims they need the poles to walk?

    i dont advocate this sorta along the lines of a fake service dog but don't think
    that TSA can deny something that helps one walk...


    3. You get to decide if you would rather throw them away or miss your flight.


    that is not true......

    if one gets to security and tries go through with poles with a carry on-----they can go
    back to the counter and put them in the backpack and check both of them.....

    it might cost some money, but that might offset the cost of new poles.....

    and some airlines will provide a big bag (plastic) that one can use to check the bag....
    Last edited by TNhiker; 01-08-2021 at 22:09.

  20. #20

    Default

    If you are going to fly with your gear, get a direct flight. I recall a flight to New Hampshire and had a 1.5 hour layover in NY. Well, my checked luggage didn't arrive with me and didn't see it until late the following day. Definitely would put my pack in a duffel bag. I have had soft sided suitcase arrive with a large cut in the fabric after only flying once with it. Luggage was made of a much heavier canvas fabric than my lightweight pack is. Oh, and then a friend of mine had his stove confiscated (he did not fly with any fuel) because it had fuel residue in it. There is no arguing with TSA unless you don't want to make your flight. Just because some people have never had a problem, doesn't mean others haven't.

    The reasons I don't like to fly with my pack is: My backpack is small and my 2 section UL carbon fiber trekkng poles do not fit inside it (7.5oz total weight for the pair so they are thin). The idea of letting them travel loose in a duffel bag just seems like I'm asking them to get broken given what I've seen of baggage handlers loving care. Though I suppose I could put them in cardboard tube. But then I'd have to find a similar tube on the return trip. Then there is my friend's issue with his stove I listed above. Many airlines are now charging fees for even 1 piece of check in luggage so it isn't like it's costing me much more to ship it. Just seems simpler to mail it 1 week ahead of time then deal with checking it in and having to stand in line for the privilege of doing so and then having to wait again on the far side for it to be unloaded. But to each their own.
    Last edited by Miner; 01-08-2021 at 21:54.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •