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  1. #21
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    Agree with Miner. You can argue with the TSA saying the poles are walking aids. Then you can loose your poles and be a jerk at the same time. Your choice. Going back to check them with your bag doesn't work if you've already checked your bag. My bag is too long to qualify as as a carry on. Could I get it through? Probably, but only if I wanted to be the jerk that fills the overhead bin with my oversized bag. Then there is the stove problem. My poles collapse small enough to stow inside the pack which goes in the duffel so they are not loose. And I've only checked the bag on direct flights to decrease that lost bag issue.

  2. #22
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    You can argue with the TSA saying the poles are walking aids. Then you can loose your poles and be a jerk at the same time


    yeah.......i dont advocate it but you know that someone will try to make that argument......just like the emotional support animal arguement.....


    Going back to check them with your bag doesn't work if you've already checked your bag.

    since im guessing that asking for one's bag back after it's been checked, as tsa would probably freak---
    what about just checking the pole separate?



    the bottom line is that at least the OP is asking this before their trip and can hopefully learn and figure out
    what needs to be done....

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by PennyPincher View Post
    I put rubber tips on my trekking poles, collapse them down, and then carry them on with me. Haven't done it in a few years but had no problem the last time.
    A few years ago trekking poles were generally allowed in carryon. The updated "banned from the Cabin" list includes them now and they are no longer allowed in carry on. Xray machines "see" through the rubber tips and clearly show the pointed ends of the poles, one takes the gamble of being denied through the check point with them even if one removes the pointed tips, they are still trekking poles and as such, can be denied. I would hesitate claiming they are a "walking aid" since the owner will likely be ambulatory going through the body scanners and the poies will be in carry on (likely inside a pack). With a few million air miles under my belt, I have yet to see anyone win a clearance argument with TSA once an item has been pulled. The TSA has final authority on what clears screening.

    I usually ship my pack and gear ahead of me to a hotel that I will arrange for it to be held until my arrival. For me, this is worth the effort and avoids any potential issues at the airport. If not staying at a hotel on arrival the OP may want to consider using UPS or FedEx shipping "stores" as the pick up point. There is usually a shipping center "store" near most metro airports that a shuttle driver or Uber can get to, which I have also done without trouble.

    When I do take my backpack to the airport, like most backpacks it is well outside the maximum length allowed for carry on so I will put it into a cheap duffel bag to prevent snagging on straps and pack fabric and check it. There will probably be a few people who have not had good experiences with these processes, but for me I have not had any trouble with this or shipping at this point.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by TNhiker View Post
    what about just checking the pole separate.
    Yes. For just 25$ you get the fun of having baggage handlers break your poles AND you get to run back to the check-in counter, wait in that line again, run back to security, wait in that line again and hope you don't miss your flight.

  5. #25

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    I have flown across country four round trips to backpack. Always put the trekking poles inside the checked backpacks, which were usually around 60 liters. I have used the REI Pack Duffel a few times, but recently went by the local U-Haul and got a $6 roll of movers wrap. It's like Saran Wrap on steroids. Wrapped up the pack like a mummy. Kept it clean and protected. Got to destination airport, unwrapped it and disposed of the wrap. I will admit that when you see the pack come onto the baggage claim conveyor it is a sigh of relief. Happy Trails.

  6. #26
    Registered User ldsailor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TNhiker View Post
    what if one claims they need the poles to walk?

    i dont advocate this sorta along the lines of a fake service dog but don't think
    that TSA can deny something that helps one walk...
    I did this a few years ago, went through security with one of my trekking poles used as a cane. It was at the Tri-City Airport in Tennessee. I had a rubber tip on the end of the pole and the other pole was in my carry-on. TSA gave me a wooden cane, which they had on-hand for just this purpose, to get through security. They sent my trekking pole through the scanner along with my other one in a bag. I returned the wooden cane and went on my way with the trekking poles.
    Trail Name - Slapshot
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  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Odd Man Out View Post
    Yes. For just 25$ you get the fun of having baggage handlers break your poles AND you get to run back to the check-in counter, wait in that line again, run back to security, wait in that line again and hope you don't miss your flight.
    I fly SWA. No baggage charges and no having to keep track of "all my stuff" at the airports. never had a problem.

    Delta was the worst in my experience before I switched to SWA.
    https://tinyurl.com/MyFDresults

    A vigorous five-mile walk will do more good for an unhappy but otherwise healthy adult than all the medicine and psychology in the world. ~Paul Dudley White

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Odd Man Out View Post
    Yes. For just 25$ you get the fun of having baggage handlers break your poles AND you get to run back to the check-in counter, wait in that line again, run back to security, wait in that line again and hope you don't miss your flight.

    so you're saying it can be done.....

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Emerson Bigills View Post
    Always put the trekking poles inside the checked backpacks, which were usually around 60 liters. I have used the REI Pack Duffel a few times, but recently went by the local U-Haul and got a $6 roll of movers wrap. It's like Saran Wrap on steroids. Wrapped up the pack like a mummy. Kept it clean and protected.... Happy Trails.
    wrapping your bag is a great idea. even if you go with a garage sale duffel, wrap the poles to the bag.

    You haven't mentioned how you are getting from the airport to Amicalola, but just before the turn off the 4 lane, there are 3 large grocery stores, a Walmart, HomeDepot and a very well stocked outfitter (Outdoor World)

  10. #30

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    I once had to check my backpack so I bought a $5 laundry bag at Walmart and put it in there.
    https://tinyurl.com/MyFDresults

    A vigorous five-mile walk will do more good for an unhappy but otherwise healthy adult than all the medicine and psychology in the world. ~Paul Dudley White

  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Emerson Bigills View Post
    I have flown across country four round trips to backpack. Always put the trekking poles inside the checked backpacks, which were usually around 60 liters. I have used the REI Pack Duffel a few times, but recently went by the local U-Haul and got a $6 roll of movers wrap. It's like Saran Wrap on steroids. Wrapped up the pack like a mummy. Kept it clean and protected. Got to destination airport, unwrapped it and disposed of the wrap. I will admit that when you see the pack come onto the baggage claim conveyor it is a sigh of relief. Happy Trails.
    Just make sure to wrap your pack in such a manner that TSA can get into it if they decide they need to check something out.
    Since they will do things like cut locks to check luggage, they wouldn't have any qualms about cutting some wrap.

  12. #32
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    Flying out of Boston, my frozen butter in a foil package (allowed) always gets checked for residue and my foot long sandwich occasionally. TSA does not like liquids, gels, metal, foil, and densely packed or unidentifiable items. I try to put all these items in one bin for easy identification. This puts olive oil, mayo and ketchup packages, tuna or any cans, foil packages of tuna and peanut butter on the questionable or limited lists. Any thing that has ever had fuel in it is not allowed even in luggage.

    Certain things cannot be put in luggage, cargo or air mailed that can catch fire or cause harm. Acids, matches and certain batteries fall in this category. Some of these may be allowed on board because any issues can be dealt with. Hence matches, certain batteries and Coke-Cola (very acidic) may be allowed. Back in scouts I watched as a Sucrets can of matches caught fire as my patrol leader put it in his back pocket.

    Airlines now scan your luggage at all steps. Loss of luggage is rare. My experience is hundreds of flights with a good share of delayed luggage if checked (btw they usually will deliver it). I had one pink (can't be lost) duffel bag stolen the late 80's after the airline located it. USPS, UPS etc also struggle at time with delivery times and lost or misdelivered packages.

    I much prefer too many TSA than long lines or dangerous flights. I moved to Indonesia during the first Gulf War. While there, a plane was hijacked in Asia with a pocket knife. Years later I was happily on the PCT a day out of town oblivious to the world around me on 9/11 when certain people used box cutters. Please follow the TSA rules, support them and don't discuss how you might get something on board that is not allowed.

  13. #33
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    Looks like you are aiming for a late February start? You might contact your shuttle driver about shipping to them. If you have any questions about the specifics of airport to Amicalola, DM me. There are others on the board who are local to the area and can be of help.

  14. #34
    Registered User Bubblehead's Avatar
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    One year, I mailed my pack UPS from Florida to Angel's Rest hostel in Pearisburg. No problems.
    The last few years I have always checked my pack on the plane. No problems. Just make sure you strap your pack down good and tight...

  15. #35
    Registered User searust's Avatar
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    I am checking my bag, and shipping my stove and a couple things to amicalola falls a couple weeks before. So I might just give the bag to the shuttle driver. Thanks everyone for the good answers.

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