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  1. #21

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    Cascade Mountain Tech may be cheap, but they're well made poles that have been used by a lot of us. I have no concerns about their quality.

  2. #22
    Registered User colorado_rob's Avatar
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    Another vote for those bargain Cascade Mtn. poles. Super light carbon fiber.

    I have broken TWO of them now since I started using them, but both times were on fairly extreme terrain and I have a solid history of breaking carbon fiber poles. After I broke the first pole, I bought a second pair, then broke another, but still have two complete poles PLUS lots of spare parts all for $60.

    I like everything about them, including the handles, straps and locking mechanisms. Well, the tips do wear out fairly quickly on rocky terrain (like out here in the west), but one set would last an entire AT I would think.

  3. #23
    Some days, it's not worth chewing through the restraints.
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    Quote Originally Posted by sam1000000 View Post
    This is one of the handful of videos I had seen on the setup https://youtu.be/GOoKpAXTyjE
    So this isn't "hanging a hammock", this is using a hammock as a bivy. Your but is more than touching the ground, you are entirely on the ground, and your poles are only holding up the ends of the hammock and the tarp. Any poles will do the job, as will stout sticks.

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Deadeye View Post
    So this isn't "hanging a hammock", this is using a hammock as a bivy. Your but is more than touching the ground, you are entirely on the ground, and your poles are only holding up the ends of the hammock and the tarp. Any poles will do the job, as will stout sticks.
    Agree and this was my explanation but deadeye explained it better then I
    Trail Miles: 4,090.3 - AT Trips: 71
    AT Map 1: 2004.8
    AT Map 2: 265.0
    Sheltowee Trace Map: 116.0
    BMT Map: 57.7
    Pinhoti Trail Map: 31.5

  5. #25
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    Yep, the OP's video link shows ground setup with hammock as a bivy. In that case any kind of trekking pole or found stick will work.

    The issue isn't really the poles (unless there are literally no found sticks to be had) but carrying an air mat or CCF pad for the ground.




    ok.........thanks...

    twenty five years of watching/shooting/editing video all day long for work has taught me
    not to watch but the rare, occasional video......

    i will watch tv and movies but i consider those "different"......

    and mainly i have those on while im reading a book (usually watching a hockey or football game)......

  6. #26
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    07-20-2014
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    Hiker Hunger makes some really good poles at a great price.I used them on my thru hikes of the A.T. and the Pinhoti trail.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by TNhiker View Post
    ok.........thanks...

    twenty five years of watching/shooting/editing video all day long for work has taught me
    not to watch but the rare, occasional video......

    i will watch tv and movies but i consider those "different"......

    and mainly i have those on while im reading a book (usually watching a hockey or football game)......
    As a hammock person myself, when the OP said "set up my hammock" my first thought was hanging the hammock between 2 trekking poles. Which is in fact possible but IMO not practical, and certainly not with "affordable" (i.e. "cheap") trekking poles. Seems that people sometimes see a video or an article somewhere and think it's a common thing.
    UL, because nobody ever asks "How can I make my pack heavier?"

  8. #28

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    I have been hammocking in the South East for about 20 years and never been forced to ground yet but am always prepared with a groundsheet and a very light pad.No way I would suspend a hammock off a trekking pole,even if it was made of steel.

    Here's Shugs video on using poles and a hammock to set up tarp and bivvy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0j54vMKGhiQ

  9. #29

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    Check the Zpacks poles - Only $99 for a pair of carbon fiber at 7.2 oz each

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