WhiteBlaze Pages
A Complete Appalachian Trail Guidebook.
$10 for printed copy. $6 for PDF.
Read more here WhiteBlaze Pages Store

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3
Results 41 to 58 of 58

Thread: Camp shoes?

  1. #41

    Default

    Sounds like our trajectories have gone in opposite directions. I started as a backpacker and added trail running as a great way to stay in shape for backpacking without the monotony of running on the road. Ultras came into the picture when I realized that I thoroughly enjoyed being out all day on a hike/run where friendly faces appeared every hour or so when you'd least expect it, offering food and drink to help you on your journey.

  2. #42
    Registered User colorado_rob's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-20-2012
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Age
    64
    Posts
    4,528
    Images
    3

    Default

    wow, this all brings back fond memories... I ran both XC and track (1/4 and half mile) in HS and for a while in college, and yeah, I wore those ridiculously light racing flats/spikes. I wish I hadn't thrown them away now!

  3. #43
    Registered User Prov's Avatar
    Join Date
    05-29-2010
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Age
    46
    Posts
    39

    Default

    If anyone looks into a pair you genuinely can find them for $15-25. The running shoe companies are always coming out with new and “better” (so they think, they usually screw up a really good shoe) models and the stores steeply discount the year or two old ones. The shorter the distance it is intended for, the lighter the weight (less cushioning, etc is needed).

  4. #44

    Default

    I'm amazed that they're so much lighter than a stripped down alternative like the Trail Glove. I'd love to get a close look at a pair of flats just to get my head wrapped around them. Sounds intriguing.

  5. #45
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-02-2011
    Location
    Nashville
    Posts
    509
    Journal Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by garlic08 View Post
    What are your trail shoes? Mine are so comfortable and dry so quickly it makes no sense to bring second pair.
    Agree, I don't carry extra camp shoes, just open the laces of my trial runners and I'm good.

  6. #46

    Default

    Some of these shower shoe posts reminds me of my Army days.. I NEVER wore them,,, and had folks ooooh at me..
    My reasoning was, worse that can happen is some toe jam I can kill with a bit of spray.
    wearing flip flops,, I'll break my neck... I CANNOT walk in the dang things, bust out the front, slide out the side, Same with crocks,,, walk around,, bust out the side.

  7. #47
    Registered User Mikerfixit's Avatar
    Join Date
    11-04-2016
    Location
    Edgewood, MD
    Age
    53
    Posts
    53

    Default

    Crocks made or makes an aqua-crock. The bottom of the shoe is the same as a regular crock but the upper is fabric with a Velcro closure at the back of the ankle like a sports sandal. They fit snugger than a regular crock and dry pretty quick once wet. I used them as a camp shoe for a few trips thinking that if I needed to do a water crossing I could slip them on and just hung them on the outside of my pack while backpacking.

    When waking up in the middle of the night with the "I gots to goes now!" I found them difficult to just slip on and opening the Velcro in the middle of the night seemed to echo into oblivion when I was trying to be as quick and quiet as I could.

  8. #48
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-04-2013
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    4,129

    Default

    The only time I carry "camp" footwear is when I go to Europe where I stay in hostels and huts exclusively rather than camp. Many facilities, especially in the Alps, make you take your "boots" off before coming in, even if your "boots" are really trail runners. Some provide house slippers but sharing footwear is pretty gross in my opinion. So I carry flip flops in that situation. For backpacking in the U.S., I haven't carried camp shoes even on trips where I use hostels and public showers. For me the weight isn't worth it. I don't spend much time in camp anyway since I'm out there to hike, not camp, and most hostel shower floors are not that bad in my experience.

  9. #49
    Journeyman Journeyer
    Join Date
    08-09-2016
    Location
    Central Kentucky
    Age
    61
    Posts
    173
    Images
    6

    Default

    Always looking for a lightweight solution for camp shoes or creek crossers. I ordered a pair of these but alas, these are not the solution. I usually wear a size 10.5 and ordered these in a 11 but could barely get my foot in. Put them on the scale and a size 11 is about 15oz. These are going right back.

  10. #50
    Registered User Prov's Avatar
    Join Date
    05-29-2010
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Age
    46
    Posts
    39

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by grubbster View Post
    Always looking for a lightweight solution for camp shoes or creek crossers. I ordered a pair of these but alas, these are not the solution. I usually wear a size 10.5 and ordered these in a 11 but could barely get my foot in. Put them on the scale and a size 11 is about 15oz. These are going right back.
    What are “these”?

  11. #51
    Registered User Bubblehead's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-06-2015
    Location
    Port Orange, Florida
    Age
    59
    Posts
    152

    Default

    Thanks for all the good answers. Think I'll leave my camp shoes at home this year and take the super feet out when I get to camp and loosen the laces....thanks again!

  12. #52
    Journeyman Journeyer
    Join Date
    08-09-2016
    Location
    Central Kentucky
    Age
    61
    Posts
    173
    Images
    6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Prov View Post
    What are “these”?
    Sorry, the Saucony Kilkinny that have been discussed.

  13. #53
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-25-2010
    Location
    Newark, DE
    Age
    60
    Posts
    79
    Images
    20

    Default

    Got my Kilkenny flats this week. They don't save as much weight vs. the Crocs as I hoped - only 25g less. I ordered the same size as my boots (12) and they fit fine. I still plan on giving them a try - will be nice to have another option besides the Crocs.

  14. #54
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-04-2017
    Location
    Central CT
    Age
    34
    Posts
    267

    Default

    My light trail runners dried as quick as most and I think that drying in a half hour is 'tad' exaggerated... even if you took them off and put them in the sun. Like there just going to dry out with a soaking wet sock without taking anything off after being submerged, especially when it's colder out. To each their own though, I'd rather take a minute to change them and call it safety break time on the other side as my feet dry a minute before slipping some nice dry socks back on, even giving them a few minutes to air out during the crossing. Taking care of your feet goes a long way to. I also hiked the AT without getting one blister, I bet not too many people could say that ; )
    NoDoz
    nobo 2018 March 10th - October 19th
    -
    I'm just one too many mornings and 1,000 miles behind

  15. #55
    Registered User colorado_rob's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-20-2012
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Age
    64
    Posts
    4,528
    Images
    3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LazyLightning View Post
    My light trail runners dried as quick as most and I think that drying in a half hour is 'tad' exaggerated...

    Taking care of your feet goes a long way to. I also hiked the AT without getting one blister, I bet not too many people could say that ; )
    Well, the drying time depends on how soaked and the local climate, I suppose, but I agree, 1/2 hour if thoroughly wet is optimistic. It is amazing though with trail runners; fording streams in them w/o even breaking a stride, they seem to be mostly dried out in no time and "feel" mostly dry. I think the walking motion pumps the moisture out quickly. Because of this, I just have never seem any need for separate water-crossing shoes.

    I agree on the foot care thing, especially in my case with respect to foot skin inflammation, I suppose when it happens it's some kind of fungus (AKA: athlete's foot"). I have to be diligent about frequent washing and airing out of the old dogs even on bone-dry hiking days.

    For the record, in maybe fifteen thousand (probably more) miles of hiking, I haven't had any sort of blister in probably 20 years. Nor has my wife. Nor have any of my regular hiking pals (well, to my knowledge). I'm not actually bragging, just pointing out that if you make hiking a way of life, blisters become a complete non-issue.

  16. #56
    Registered User
    Join Date
    09-07-2016
    Location
    Flowery Branch, GA
    Posts
    11

    Default

    You may want to use some type of shower shoes. I never felt comfortable using hostel showers and even some of the hotels we stayed at. A foot fungus could be the end of a long hike. That was the only time I really enjoyed having them. I use lightweight flip flops. They make it easy to wash my feet in the shower.

  17. #57

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HooKooDooKu View Post
    What makes sense to me is if you can combine water shoes and camp shoes into one thing...
    I don't like crossing deep creeks in bare feet... too many ways you can harm you feet.
    And I specifically want a shoe that is closed toe.

    @Bubblehead 8oz is what I look for in water shoes, so if you're 9oz camp shoes can double as water shoes, I think you're good.
    Yep. This.
    The crocs I initially used are the type that didn't have holes in the upper. Those were really warm in winter camping. They also were good at keeping socks dry walking through dewey grass around camp. But I wanted something I could actually hike in and do water crossings in when I eventually got to one.

    The Ragin Redhead water shoes I bought, which are better than crocs, hold water when used as shower shoes or if used for water crossings. Annoying.

    I discovered another option.
    A friend of mine uses them on their boat. very light, mesh uppers, perforated bottoms, fit like athletic shoes...super comfortable, pretty cheap. Amazon.com | DOUSSPRT Men's Water Shoes Quick Drying Sports Aqua Shoes | Water Shoes

  18. #58
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-25-2021
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Age
    34
    Posts
    3

    Default

    I like camp shoes because they are super comfortable.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •