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  1. #81
    GoldenBear's Avatar
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    Lightbulb About wet cashmere

    Quote Originally Posted by CalebJ View Post
    How does cashmere handle getting wet?
    https://sewingiscool.com/is-cashmere-warm-for-winter/

  2. #82

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    Quote Originally Posted by Grampie View Post
    Their is nothing better than a hot meal after hiking a long cold or wet day.
    I 100% agree, but OP doesn’t get much from it

  3. #83

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    Their is nothing better than a hot meal after hiking a long cold or wet day siting next to the campfire.


  4. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grampie View Post
    Their is nothing better than a hot meal after hiking a long cold or wet day.
    A hot sweet drink, dry cloths, a warm bed, and a special someone to cuddle up with to stay warm?
    I'm not lost. I'm exploring.

  5. #85

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    Quote Originally Posted by nsherry61 View Post
    Oh my. Quite obviously you haven't spent much time starting fires in the Pacific Northwest or other area that get truly soaking wet. And, I was actually talking specifically about real emergencies, NOT pretend emergency scenarios. Fires always seem logical in a TV or Boy Scout survival scenario. In practice, fires are a pain in the butt to start and maintain in less than ideal conditions and, in most cases, curling up inside some kind of shelter with good insulation and a working stove is way more effective, at least in the short run.

    Please, please, please don't go out in the woods expecting fire to be a ready solution to an emergency and easily "attainable by anyone with little practice!" The exact situations where warmth is most often called for in an emergency are exactly the situations that make fire building problematic.
    You convinced me, fires are a bad idea and not a skill any outdoor person should try to master. There is a 10,000 year record of peoples using fire in the AT corridor. I'm off to buy a cat food can and watch more TV, thanks

  6. #86

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    Quote Originally Posted by nsherry61 View Post
    Oh my. Quite obviously you haven't spent much time starting fires in the Pacific Northwest or other area that get truly soaking wet. And, I was actually talking specifically about real emergencies, NOT pretend emergency scenarios. Fires always seem logical in a TV or Boy Scout survival scenario. In practice, fires are a pain in the butt to start and maintain in less than ideal conditions and, in most cases, curling up inside some kind of shelter with good insulation and a working stove is way more effective, at least in the short run.

    Please, please, please don't go out in the woods expecting fire to be a ready solution to an emergency and easily "attainable by anyone with little practice!" The exact situations where warmth is most often called for in an emergency are exactly the situations that make fire building problematic.
    You convinced me, fires are a bad idea and not a skill any outdoor person should try to master. There is a 10,000 year record of peoples using fire in the AT corridor. I'm off to buy a cat food can and watch more TV, thanks

  7. #87

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    Quote Originally Posted by AsoloBootsSuk View Post
    You convinced me, fires are a bad idea and not a skill any outdoor person should try to master. There is a 10,000 year record of peoples using fire in the AT corridor. I'm off to buy a cat food can and watch more TV, thanks
    Bless your heart.

  8. #88

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    Quote Originally Posted by AsoloBootsSuk View Post
    You convinced me, fires are a bad idea and not a skill any outdoor person should try to master. There is a 10,000 year record of peoples using fire in the AT corridor. I'm off to buy a cat food can and watch more TV, thanks
    Nobody said you shouldn't know how to build a fire.

    But IMO it is supremely unwise to waste one's last fading moments with minimal dexterity and clarity of thought trying to build a fire when one could be erecting a shelter and getting into dry layers.

    Many times I've been in situations where building a fire is nigh impossible and I know what I'm doing. Teaching noobs that this is #1 on the list of survival strategies is just plain stupid.
    UL, because nobody ever asks "How can I make my pack heavier?"

  9. #89

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    Quote Originally Posted by CalebJ View Post
    How does cashmere handle getting wet? That would be my only immediate concern. Everything gets wet at some point.
    In my experience, it insulates better dry or wet compared to my merino Iceraker baselayer. Cashmere does not keep its shape as well meaning if you get it soaked, it can get baggy. This quality is actually an advantage overall, the fibers bend more easily than merino and it seems to hang on your body better. Drawback is lower abrasion resistance. I could be wrong, this is just my observation

  10. #90

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    Quote Originally Posted by HankIV View Post
    I 100% agree, but OP doesn’t get much from it
    Rather overly simplified.

    None of the food that I would want to eat would be easily cooked or carried, even if I did not hate cooking and cleaning. I like good food. The crap other people (OP) eat is their own business. I know after any long, hard day, the last thing I want to do is light a stove. Now, if someone handed me a plate of something hot and edible, I'd be game.

  11. #91

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    Quote Originally Posted by cmoulder View Post
    Nobody said you shouldn't know how to build a fire.

    But IMO it is supremely unwise to waste one's last fading moments with minimal dexterity and clarity of thought trying to build a fire when one could be erecting a shelter and getting into dry layers.

    Many times I've been in situations where building a fire is nigh impossible and I know what I'm doing. Teaching noobs that this is #1 on the list of survival strategies is just plain stupid.
    100% agreed with all of this. Having the skill to build a fire is a useful asset in your toolbox of knowledge. But it's just not anywhere near the top of things you should reach for when you're starting to get hypothermic.

  12. #92
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    Who read this in high school English class?
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/To_Build_a_Fire

  13. #93

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    Absolutely. That still haunts me.

  14. #94

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    Quote Originally Posted by AsoloBootsSuk View Post
    I was talking about emergencies. All of your scenarios assume you have not been separated from your pack. or that your stove works properly or you haven't leaked or spilled all of your fuel. The ability to start a fire in wet conditions is a basic skill and is attainable by anyone with little practice.
    Because my previous quote was edited to suit the narrative, I'll repost it myself

  15. #95

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    Quote Originally Posted by AsoloBootsSuk View Post
    I was talking about emergencies. All of your scenarios assume you have not been separated from your pack. or that your stove works properly or you haven't leaked or spilled all of your fuel. The ability to start a fire in wet conditions is a basic skill and is attainable by anyone with little practice.
    Because my previous quote was edited to suit the narrative, I'll repost it myself

  16. #96

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    You reposted that as if it was relevant to the discussion.

    It's not.

    The important part, that you are simply fundamentally off base about, is the second part.

    It is absurd that anyone (with little or large amounts of practice) can reliably start a fire in wet conditions. Especially when they're already shivering and suffering from the effects of hypothermia. Got a hiking partner that's in good shape? Sure - after they've helped you into dry clothes and into a dry tent and sleeping bag, and made you a nice meal and sugary beverage, a fire might not be a bad afterthought.

  17. #97

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    Quote Originally Posted by AsoloBootsSuk View Post
    In a true emergency, I cannot think of a reason to not just build a fire to warm up. As far as hot food? Try it at home for 2 weeks, eat no stove meals 24/7 and see how you like it. I have done many 3 day weekends with no stove and had no problem.
    Quote Originally Posted by AsoloBootsSuk View Post
    I was talking about emergencies. All of your scenarios assume you have not been separated from your pack. or that your stove works properly or you haven't leaked or spilled all of your fuel. The ability to start a fire in wet conditions is a basic skill and is attainable by anyone with little practice.
    Quote Originally Posted by AsoloBootsSuk View Post
    You convinced me, fires are a bad idea and not a skill any outdoor person should try to master. There is a 10,000 year record of peoples using fire in the AT corridor. I'm off to buy a cat food can and watch more TV, thanks
    Quote Originally Posted by AsoloBootsSuk View Post
    Because my previous quote was edited to suit the narrative, I'll repost it myself
    This is the order these were posted in. People started responding to you after your first post. You did clarify a "true emergency" and "emergency" but they had already responded.

    That being said, your posts were edited with an ellipsis (...) each time. That's acceptable practice but I would caution its use. It's not particularly necessary for short posts, which these were. I do consider not using the ellipsis to be selectively quoting.

    So it seems you are saying that an emergency where fire building is an important early consideration is separation from pack. Not exactly what the OP asked but there was a safety component. So I recommend reevaluating the discussion going forward taking into account the fullly quoted posts here.

    Hypothermia will kill you faster than lack of water or food. Roughly 3,3,3. Three hours vs. three days vs. three weeks.
    "Sleepy alligator in the noonday sun
    Sleepin by the river just like he usually done
    Call for his whisky
    He can call for his tea
    Call all he wanta but he can't call me..."
    Robert Hunter & Ron McKernan

    Whiteblaze.net User Agreement.

  18. #98

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    Quote Originally Posted by CalebJ View Post
    You reposted that as if it was relevant to the discussion.

    It's not.

    The important part, that you are simply fundamentally off base about, is the second part.

    It is absurd that anyone (with little or large amounts of practice) can reliably start a fire in wet conditions. Especially when they're already shivering and suffering from the effects of hypothermia. Got a hiking partner that's in good shape? Sure - after they've helped you into dry clothes and into a dry tent and sleeping bag, and made you a nice meal and sugary beverage, a fire might not be a bad afterthought.

    Just for fun, suppose you did not have any of the items in bold above. You could hike out, oh wait, your head lamp was in the pack. If you have to spend the night a fire is not an afterthought.

  19. #99

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    Quote Originally Posted by AsoloBootsSuk View Post
    Just for fun, suppose you did not have any of the items in bold above. You could hike out, oh wait, your head lamp was in the pack. If you have to spend the night a fire is not an afterthought.
    I've given tremendous thought to the David Decareaux tragedy in the Ozarks where he and his two sons expired from hypothermia in January 2013 on a dayhike.

    Here's a telling quote from the article---
    As the three hikers were making their way home that afternoon and evening, heavy rain set in, and when night arrived, the temperature plummeted into the 20s.

    From
    https://www.rockmnation.com/2013/2/5...he-ozark-trail


    1) Day starts out warm in 50Fs.
    2) Rainstorm hits at around 35F.
    3) Rain usually stops and temps drop drastically to 20F or 10F or 0F
    4) Temps rise in clear weather back to 50Fs.

    I've always known about this cycle but put his name to it as a sort of homage.

    The "tremendous thought" part comes in when I envision what I would do in a similar scenario with little gear (they were dayhikers). Some considerations and options:
    1) Bail out of the wind (off a ridge etc).
    2) Find a rock overhang or big blowdown.
    3) Stuff a crawlspace with bushels of dead leaves (wet leaves---doesn't matter)
    4) Crawl into leaves and place bushels of dead leaves on top of you/group to survive the night. ETC ETC

  20. #100

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    Quote Originally Posted by AsoloBootsSuk View Post
    Just for fun, suppose you did not have any of the items in bold above. You could hike out, oh wait, your head lamp was in the pack. If you have to spend the night a fire is not an afterthought.
    So after I clarified for you, you have gone and grabbed a post where the person may not have been caught up to your evolving position. What you are doing is perpetuating the argument I just moderated.

    Please restate the conditions of the scenario you are describing fully if you wish to continue.

    Thank you.
    "Sleepy alligator in the noonday sun
    Sleepin by the river just like he usually done
    Call for his whisky
    He can call for his tea
    Call all he wanta but he can't call me..."
    Robert Hunter & Ron McKernan

    Whiteblaze.net User Agreement.

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