WhiteBlaze Pages
A Complete Appalachian Trail Guidebook.
$10 for printed copy. $6 for PDF.
Read more here WhiteBlaze Pages Store

Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    Registered User Big Dawg's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-23-2004
    Location
    NC
    Age
    53
    Posts
    1,638
    Images
    67

    Default Neoair Uberlite, sack weights

    Hi WB! For anyone who owns the Thermarest Neoair Uberlite, what is the weight of the stuff sack and pump sack that come w/ the pad? Also, anyone who owns the regular-wide version, is the listed weight of 11.0 ounces correct? I assume thatís just the pad and not the sacks. Unfortunately, Cascade Designs c/s doesnít know the answer to these questions. Thanks!!
    NOBO section hiker, 1066.4 miles... & counting!!

  2. #2

    Default

    I believe uberlite and xlite pump sacs are indentical. My xlite sac goes just under 3 oz.....possibly 2.5 oz.

  3. #3
    Registered User GolfHiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    03-13-2004
    Location
    Pinehurst, NC
    Age
    68
    Posts
    232

    Default

    Can I politely ask a question regarding the need for a sack & air pump? When did having an air pump become a thing? I’ve always viewed blowing up my air pad as a routine, just like getting water at camp or many other daily chores. Is it easier to use a pump?, maybe? Does having a pump weigh more than not having a pump?, yes.

    As for needed the stuff sack for your Neo, I’ve always felt that with proper care, your pad fits in the bottom of the pack, near soft things, and is basically free from damage. One less sack to carry, keep track of, lose...

    I’m not trying to be a smart ass about this, as I legitimately wonder about the need for these two items. After all, we are trying to carry as light as possible. Am I alone on this point?
    "How can something this hard be so much fun".

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GolfHiker View Post
    Can I politely ask a question regarding the need for a sack & air pump? When did having an air pump become a thing? I’ve always viewed blowing up my air pad as a routine, just like getting water at camp or many other daily chores. Is it easier to use a pump?, maybe? Does having a pump weigh more than not having a pump?, yes.

    As for needed the stuff sack for your Neo, I’ve always felt that with proper care, your pad fits in the bottom of the pack, near soft things, and is basically free from damage. One less sack to carry, keep track of, lose...

    I’m not trying to be a smart ass about this, as I legitimately wonder about the need for these two items. After all, we are trying to carry as light as possible. Am I alone on this point?
    With an older self inflating pad, a pump wasn't necessary because the pad would naturally pull in the majority of air needed to properly pressurize it. Unless you were in a hurry, you could avoid injecting much moisture at all from your breath into the pad.

    The current non self inflating pads require a large volume of air to be actively forced into them. If you do this with your mouth, you -will- eventually create large amounts of mold and mildew inside the pad. Additionally, in colder environments you'll also create ice on the inside of the pad. Using a pump prevents this entirely.

  5. #5
    Registered User GolfHiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    03-13-2004
    Location
    Pinehurst, NC
    Age
    68
    Posts
    232

    Default

    CalebJ. I totally understand your point about possible mold & mildew. I know I’ve been lucky about this issue. So far.

    quick side note. A few years ago, at an AT hostel, I saw someone with a plastic bag, capturing air, and forcing it into their air pad. I was so impressed. I guess that was the early version of the pump. I wonder if anyone is still grabbing air? I know it works, cause I saw it.
    "How can something this hard be so much fun".

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GolfHiker View Post
    Can I politely ask a question regarding the need for a sack & air pump? When did having an air pump become a thing? I’ve always viewed blowing up my air pad as a routine, just like getting water at camp or many other daily chores. Is it easier to use a pump?, maybe? Does having a pump weigh more than not having a pump?, yes.

    As for needed the stuff sack for your Neo, I’ve always felt that with proper care, your pad fits in the bottom of the pack, near soft things, and is basically free from damage. One less sack to carry, keep track of, lose...

    I’m not trying to be a smart ass about this, as I legitimately wonder about the need for these two items. After all, we are trying to carry as light as possible. Am I alone on this point?
    I don't use the sack or pump. I am not concerned about water vapor getting inside

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GolfHiker View Post
    CalebJ. I totally understand your point about possible mold & mildew. I know I’ve been lucky about this issue. So far.

    quick side note. A few years ago, at an AT hostel, I saw someone with a plastic bag, capturing air, and forcing it into their air pad. I was so impressed. I guess that was the early version of the pump. I wonder if anyone is still grabbing air? I know it works, cause I saw it.
    I've been meaning to try the trash bag approach for a while. The included inflation bag for my older xtherm is so small that it's kind of infuriating to use. The nozzle design and larger bag for inflating my Exped pad cuts the inflation time down to a fraction of what it takes for the xtherm.

  8. #8
    Registered User hobbs's Avatar
    Join Date
    12-12-2010
    Location
    fincastle Virginia
    Age
    52
    Posts
    587
    Journal Entries
    1
    Images
    8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GolfHiker View Post
    CalebJ. I totally understand your point about possible mold & mildew. I know I’ve been lucky about this issue. So far.

    quick side note. A few years ago, at an AT hostel, I saw someone with a plastic bag, capturing air, and forcing it into their air pad. I was so impressed. I guess that was the early version of the pump. I wonder if anyone is still grabbing air? I know it works, cause I saw it.
    Their was a company that made a bag that filled pool toys..They went out of business.I have two of the bags and they work on the Xlite...
    My love for life is quit simple .i get uo in the moring and then i go to bed at night. What I do inbween is to occupy my time. Cary Grant

  9. #9
    Registered User
    Join Date
    12-19-2005
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    3,716
    Images
    3

    Default

    I wonder if anyone is still grabbing air?

    I don't grab air-----I break it......

  10. #10
    Registered User GolfHiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    03-13-2004
    Location
    Pinehurst, NC
    Age
    68
    Posts
    232

    Default

    Big Dawg: I do realize that I jumped your thread and moved things in a different direction of your original question. I’m sorry I don’t know the answer to your question, and apparently no one else does either. That said, please accept my apologies. I just got carried away when I saw your post.....
    "How can something this hard be so much fun".

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GolfHiker View Post
    Big Dawg: I do realize that I jumped your thread and moved things in a different direction of your original question. Iím sorry I donít know the answer to your question, and apparently no one else does either. That said, please accept my apologies. I just got carried away when I saw your post.....
    Post #2 answered the question

    Ok, it was off by 0.5 oz. Actual weight is 2 oz...55 grams

  12. #12
    Registered User GolfHiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    03-13-2004
    Location
    Pinehurst, NC
    Age
    68
    Posts
    232

    Default

    I missed that. Sorry.
    "How can something this hard be so much fun".

  13. #13
    Registered User GolfHiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    03-13-2004
    Location
    Pinehurst, NC
    Age
    68
    Posts
    232

    Default

    Hey all. To put a wrap on this thread. I discovered a plastic bag w/ attachment, designed to “capture & insert” air in my pad. I must have had it in my gear stash for a while. I then made a good faith effort to try this on my Neo Air.

    So while in theory I like this, in practice, it’s just a bit too much fiddle factor, and one more item to carry & use. So it’s back to the box.

    My new strategy is my old one. Stand there and blow!
    "How can something this hard be so much fun".

  14. #14
    Registered User colorado_rob's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-20-2012
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Age
    64
    Posts
    4,528
    Images
    3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GolfHiker View Post
    Hey all. To put a wrap on this thread. I discovered a plastic bag w/ attachment, designed to ďcapture & insertĒ air in my pad. I must have had it in my gear stash for a while. I then made a good faith effort to try this on my Neo Air.

    So while in theory I like this, in practice, itís just a bit too much fiddle factor, and one more item to carry & use. So itís back to the box.

    My new strategy is my old one. Stand there and blow!
    Good call; I think the breath-moisture-mold-whatever thing is a bit, er, overblown. I've gotten 8+ years or so (maybe more) of service out of my xlite blow-up pads w/o any issue, to my knowledge (no failures).

    One exception: When my wife is with me, we use a double-wide pad, the Exped Hyperlite Duo, and it came with a 4 oz inflation bag (the Schnozzle), and we carry and use that when together.

  15. #15

    Default

    I found a discussion the other day about adapting the Schnozzle bag to fit the old Thermarest valve. Something I need to try soon. It would be much less infuriating to use it.

++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •