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  1. #1

    Default Quehanna Wild Area

    https://endlessmountains.wordpress.c...nna-wild-area/

    An overnight backpack into this beautiful wilderness to explore an off trail view and meadows. The meadow hike was incredible, really reminded me of Dolly Sods with miles of meadows with large white rocks. Pebble Run, and then Mosquito Creek, flowed in the valley below the meadows. There was even a view of an oxbow loop along Mosquito Creek. We camped along Mosquito Creek and the stars were spectacular, particularly Orion. Next morning we hiked to Crawford Vista and on the east cross connector with more meadows. We passed two backpackers from Detroit who were just starting their hike. Quehanna Wild Area has landscapes very different from others in the PA Wilds and is a superb place to hike.


    https://www.instagram.com/p/CMfhufoD..._web_copy_link


    https://www.instagram.com/p/CMdXhwMD..._web_copy_link


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    https://www.instagram.com/p/CMatsGhD..._web_copy_link

  2. #2

    Default

    That looks awesome! I don't mean to hijack this thread, but I have a question...

    I was planning a trip there in May, but am having some second thoughts after reading about the nuclear reactor that was there....full disclosure I am not nuclear physicist and I am a worrier...I know the area what deemed safe for outdoor recreation, but does anyone know if there is ongoing monitoring of the water downstream from the reactor site? What I got out of the decommissioning report was that water quality was deemed safe at that time, and no further action was taken in regards to that, specifically. But that clean-up was within the direct vicinity of the reactor site, and if, as the ever-reliable wikipedia (sarcasm intended) says, bears and critters were digging up radioactive waste prior to the clean-up, there could be other hotspots that were never addressed, right? I've reached out to the PA DNR, Sierra Club, and Nature Conservancy with this question, and more recently the ClearWater Conservancy, but have yet to turn up anything.

    Does anyone local or familiar with the area have any insight into this? I know there are a lot of pollution-hazards everywhere with fracking, chemical plants, plastics, etc etc these days, and there's inherent risk in backpacking (heck, there's inherent risk in living!), but just looking for data or a study to provide reassurance.

    Thanks!

    (for a backup plan, looking at the Loyalsock Trail, but I really like that Quehanna is a little longer, more remote, and is a loop)
    "Either that kid has a lightbulb up his butt, or his colon has a great idea!"

  3. #3

    Default

    Great pictures. This is not far from me. Looks like a great time

  4. #4

    Default

    Littlefoot, I'm unaware of any issues with the reactor site which was removed and cleaned up. No trail goes by the site. I've been hiking Quehanna for years and never had any problems, nor heard of others having problems. I've found water quality in Quehanna to be very good and again, never had any issues. The Quehanna Trail does not go near the site, which people sometimes visit.

  5. #5

    Default

    Littlefoot, I highly recommend Quehanna, but if you want another long, isolated loop, check out the Susquehannock Trail.

  6. #6

    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by jmitchell View Post
    Littlefoot, I highly recommend Quehanna, but if you want another long, isolated loop, check out the Susquehannock Trail.
    Thanks for your insight! Appreciate it!
    "Either that kid has a lightbulb up his butt, or his colon has a great idea!"

  7. #7

    Red face QT Trip

    Completed in 4 full days and 2 half days in mid-May, very well-marked. The flats are easy walking, but there are some steep climbs and descents. Saw 1 other backpacker, 2 dayhikers, a bunch of deer, and a bear cub (no mama in sight). Water was roaring! For the record, brought a Geiger counter, and was in the clear the whole time! Glad I did because between the late spring and gypsy moth destruction, the lack of foliage in some deciduous forest areas was a bit eerie.
    "Either that kid has a lightbulb up his butt, or his colon has a great idea!"

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