WhiteBlaze Pages
A Complete Appalachian Trail Guidebook.
$10 for printed copy(paperback). $6 for interactive PDF. $2 for printable PDF.
Read more here WhiteBlaze Pages Store

Results 1 to 19 of 19
  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    05-26-2020
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio
    Age
    23
    Posts
    5

    Default Getting used to Sleeping on CCF

    Hey Guys! I'm almost 100 miles into my NOBO thru hike of the AT and I feel as though I haven't gotten a good rest on my thermarest even once. I am traditionally a side sleeper and have been trying to force myself to sleep on my back (due to pain in my hips from sleeping on side) but I'm just having so much difficulty sleeping. I'm not really interested in inflatable pads either due to the noise and pool floaty sensation (also very tough to sleep on). I was just wondering if anyone had an estimate for how long it will take me to get used to sleeping on my ccf pad, tips for training yourself to sleep on your back, or any other suggestions?

  2. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mollyramona View Post
    Hey Guys! I'm almost 100 miles into my NOBO thru hike of the AT and I feel as though I haven't gotten a good rest on my thermarest even once. I am traditionally a side sleeper and have been trying to force myself to sleep on my back (due to pain in my hips from sleeping on side) but I'm just having so much difficulty sleeping. I'm not really interested in inflatable pads either due to the noise and pool floaty sensation (also very tough to sleep on). I was just wondering if anyone had an estimate for how long it will take me to get used to sleeping on my ccf pad, tips for training yourself to sleep on your back, or any other suggestions?
    You might try a make shift pillow between your knees when side sleeping. It helps keep everything aligned

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    05-06-2020
    Location
    Newport, NC
    Age
    45
    Posts
    20

    Default

    You may try an inflatable with your foam pad on top - less noise and a way to sleep on your side.

  4. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-03-2017
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Age
    45
    Posts
    73

    Default

    I can relate, side sleeper that prefers CCF. Buy/order another ccf pad and cut into desired length for mid section then double the padding under hips.

    I used a ridgerunner cut to 3/4 length. Pack under my legs and 1/4 Zrest under my hips. Very little weight increase, if any, and Z piece folds and works as core for rolled ridgerunner. Easy stowage and deployment.

    Section of yoga mat works just as well but you'll lose the cool gear contest. Haha

  5. #5

    Default

    I really need an inflatable to be comfortable side sleeping. There needs to be some place for the bottom hip to sink into so the spine can align properly. You can try creating a depression in the ground under your tent and ccf pad to get that effect, but that depends on site conditions and isn't exactly LNT.
    “The man who goes alone can start today; but he who travels with another must wait until that other is ready...”~Henry David Thoreau

    http://lesstraveledby.net
    YouTube Channel
    Trailspace Reviews

  6. #6

    Default

    Get a Thermarest Prolite. It's inflatable, but has a foam core so is much more comfortable then a CCF and not as noisy as an air mattress. It's also 3 season. Down side is it's one of the heavier options for a pad, but a comfortable night sleep is worth is.
    Follow slogoen on Instagram.

  7. #7
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-03-2017
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Age
    45
    Posts
    73

    Default

    Early in a thru many things affect your ability to sleep well.

    If you don't sleep like a rock...hike harder.

    It'll come. Tweak your systems as you go and GOOD LUCK!

  8. #8
    Some days, it's not worth chewing through the restraints.
    Join Date
    12-13-2004
    Location
    Essex, Vermont
    Age
    66
    Posts
    2,476

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Slo-go'en View Post
    Get a Thermarest Prolite. It's inflatable, but has a foam core so is much more comfortable then a CCF and not as noisy as an air mattress. It's also 3 season. Down side is it's one of the heavier options for a pad, but a comfortable night sleep is worth is.
    Agreed. I use the shorty Prolite (12 oz), with 6-8 sections of z-rest for extra warmth, protection, sit/nap pad, emergency use, etc. CCF alone is for teenagers only!

  9. #9
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-10-2006
    Location
    So-California
    Age
    56
    Posts
    55

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Deadeye View Post
    ... CCF alone is for teenagers only!
    The OP is almost a teenager, but even as a teenager when I got my first Thermarest (inflatable) I thought I was in heaven. I would carry 3 pounds of pad if that's what it takes for a good rest.

    I second the shorty inflatable plus full length, or at least past the knees, Z-rest. I bought a slightly lighter, slightly wider knockoff Z pad on Amazon.

  10. #10
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-01-2016
    Location
    Chattanooga, Tennessee
    Posts
    977

    Default

    I've been sleeping on CCF since I was a teen, and nearly 40 yrs since my first foray onto the AT. My 1st tip: don't sleep perfectly perpendicular to the ground. Go over "top dead center" a little bit one way or another. 2nd tip: a pillow-like solution to elevate your head while on your side. 3rd tip: I agree with Durwood - hike harder. If you're tired enough, you'll sleep on almost anything and in nearly any position.

    Alternative: have you tried sleeping on your stomach? I can't sleep on back, but I can sleep on my stomach, with my head turned. No pillow needed in that position, either. In the course of a night, I'll rotate through left side, right side, and stomach. Almost never on my back - I tend to start snoring or having some sort of catch in my breathing that wakes me up. Wish I could, but that position just doesn't work for me, unless my head and shoulders are really elevated and my head turned to the side.

  11. #11

    Default

    I've had the same problem sleeping with a CCF mat on the ground, as I'm a natural side sleeper. In fact, I'm never really comfy on the ground, no matter what mat I use. But it works quite well in a hammock, whether you sleep on your back or on your side. You already have your gear and probably won't want to make changes at this point. But no one has mentioned hammocks yet it this thread, so I thought I'd chime in.

  12. #12
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-04-2013
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    4,157

    Default

    I am normally a side sleeper but try to sleep on my back when on the trail. I used a Prolite for several years and liked it but went to the NeoAir to save weight and it is fine as well. I tried to convert to using a CCF pad and had a lot of trouble with it, coming from inflatable pads. I don't like the fact that inflatables can fail. On a long thru hike, it's just one more thing to go wrong. I have a zlite and I should just bite the bullet and take on my next trip.

  13. #13
    Registered User
    Join Date
    09-14-2015
    Location
    Fort Wayne, Indiana
    Age
    59
    Posts
    82

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mollyramona View Post
    I am traditionally a side sleeper and have been trying to force myself to sleep on my back (due to pain in my hips from sleeping on side) but I'm just having so much difficulty sleeping
    If using a Z-Lite give it an extra fold in the middle under your hips. Shortens up your pad but puts three layers right under your hip to keep you comfortable.

    ZLite.jpg

  14. #14
    Registered User
    Join Date
    05-26-2020
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio
    Age
    23
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Thank you all so much for the suggestions! I think I'm gonna try adding extra hip padding and putting my puffy between my knees to help the alignment. I'm excited to try this out tonight! You guys are the best ☺️

  15. #15
    Registered User
    Join Date
    11-01-2014
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Age
    59
    Posts
    2,477

    Default

    If you end up still not being able to get the CCF pads to work well for you, I would strongly encourage you to consider one of the quilted, inflatable type pads like the Sea-to-summit options. They do not feel like a squishy, bouncy pool float, and they aren't particularly noisy. CCF pad are great for their simplicity and reliability. But, especially, as some of us get older, no matter what we do, our bodies don't ever get comfortable enough for a reliable good night's sleep on ccf alone.

    FWIW: Another ccf pad trick not mentioned yet above is to make a donut shaped piece of foam to place under you hip bones and/or should bones, in addition to the ccf pad, to spread the load a bit better than a flat pad alone.
    I'm not lost. I'm exploring.

  16. #16

    Default

    As an outside the lines thought, if you have not tried a hammock yet, you may find this to be what you are looking for. If you are trail pals with someone using a hammock, see if you can trade off one night with them on the ground and you in the hammock to take it on a test drive. There are pros and cons for ground or hammock camping, however in my view sleep is the most important factor in camping (second only to food/water). You may find a hammock does not offer a better sleeping environment or conversely, you may find the hammock solves the sleep issue. Suffice to say it may be a worthwhile experiment to find out with nothing lost except your pal who had to spend a night on the ground, easily mended with a cheeseburger at the next town stop.

  17. #17
    Some days, it's not worth chewing through the restraints.
    Join Date
    12-13-2004
    Location
    Essex, Vermont
    Age
    66
    Posts
    2,476

    Default

    I was hesitant to suggest the hammock alternative, but Traveler paved the way. Head on over to Hammockforums.net and find someone in your area. You can just about guarantee that they'll be happy to help with a demonstration.

  18. #18
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-08-2012
    Location
    Taghkanic, New York, United States
    Posts
    3,143
    Journal Entries
    11

    Default

    I tried to make those things work for me on my thru, but although I could bear it for a short backpack trip for a few nights, on the AT it was really wearing me down without proper sleep. I ended up with a yellow thermorest neoair and that made all the difference. 2.5 inches meant I could sleep comfy on my side.

  19. #19

    Default

    A good night's sleep is worth extra cost or extra weight...or a little crinkliness.
    I started with a ridgerest, couldn't sleep on it. Tried adding a short one for hips and back. Still couldn't sleep.
    Went to a prolite plus. Slept better, but still tossed and turned all night.
    Finally bought the neo-air x-lite, and figured out not to inflate it all the way firm, and you know what ? They arent crinkly when you arent tossing and turning all night!
    Best sleep I've had so far!

++ New Posts ++

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •