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  1. #21
    Registered User hobbs's Avatar
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    We can argue this till blue in the face.Lets put it this way examples of high milage hikers Scott williamson. Andrew skruka Hiker by trail name Juniper that hiked the ect in 2016. another hiker.What do they have in common.? Found the food they could eat multiple meals that nutriest. Beans common item in their meals garanteed...I know 3 of them eat a been meal as their main thing...
    My love for life is quit simple .i get uo in the moring and then i go to bed at night. What I do inbween is to occupy my time. Cary Grant

  2. #22

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    I am generally vegan for purposes of lightening my carbon consumption and disgust at the industrial meat production process. Not a purist, occasional eggs, cheese slip in, and I am weak for ice cream.

    Going to try to maintain that as much as possible on upcoming thru. Generally good shape and muscle tone.

    I plan to lean (ha, ha) on nuts for calories, dehydrated vegetables where I can get them and walk out of towns with an apple and carrot or two to munch that day.

  3. #23

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    The first continuous triple crowner who heard that it was impossible to do a triple crown in a continuous hikes (versus jumping around like Flying Brian and Anish) and went ahead and did it anyhow was infamous for claiming he ignored all nutrition advice. https://backpackinglight.com/forums/topic/1915/ There is podcast floating around somewhere of an interview with him. He represented himself as a honey donut and Snickers bar kind of hiker although I suspect it was just good PR. I dont think he was into publicity and he has faded into obscurity, even Wikipedia makes the claim that it can not be done.

  4. #24

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    I don't eat red meat very often, mostly as I can't afford it. Though on a long hike, a juicy, fat burger really hits the spot. First thing I do when I get to a grocery store is chug a pint of chocolate milk.

    I have no problem with dairy products. Having lived in Vermont and knowing some dairy farmers, they take good care of their cows - or they won't produce much milk. I'm fortunate that I get free eggs from my neighbor's chickens. The half dozen roosters across the street can be a little annoying though.
    Follow slogoen on Instagram.

  5. #25
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    Dont buy into hype BS that excuses problematic health consequences of the SAD, junk food binging, or the common AT dietary modality. They are excuses to further poor unhealthy off trail dietary habits/addictions(yes, there's this thing called eating disorders/eating behavioral addictions, maybe some have heard of it) on trail. It's not hard, bulky or shartty tasting to make healthier food choices at home and on trail particularly in the food abundant U.S. At least 6 if not all 10 of the 10 top causes of death in the U.S. are linked to dietary causality. These top 10 account for about 75% of all U.S. deaths. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/art...#heart-disease The consequences somehow don't suddenly magically disappear because one claims to be on a thru hike or is a hiker. This is blunt, but the health issues of the U.S. pop is partly a result of ignoring dietary quantity and quality evident in the most common diseases. And, don't expect the western medical system to offer much advice on nutrition as it is vastly ignored as it's main pillars it focuses are disease management, surgeries, and meds. Nor should one totally rely on bought out state and Federal gov't agencies.

    It's a gross misconception eating like a pig, ignoring that food is more than calories is without repercussions just because thru hikers or runners are highly active.

  6. #26
    Registered User hobbs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    Dont buy into hype BS that excuses problematic health consequences of the SAD, junk food binging, or the common AT dietary modality. They are excuses to further poor unhealthy off trail dietary habits/addictions(yes, there's this thing called eating disorders/eating behavioral addictions, maybe some have heard of it) on trail. It's not hard, bulky or shartty tasting to make healthier food choices at home and on trail particularly in the food abundant U.S. At least 6 if not all 10 of the 10 top causes of death in the U.S. are linked to dietary causality. These top 10 account for about 75% of all U.S. deaths. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/art...#heart-disease The consequences somehow don't suddenly magically disappear because one claims to be on a thru hike or is a hiker. This is blunt, but the health issues of the U.S. pop is partly a result of ignoring dietary quantity and quality evident in the most common diseases. And, don't expect the western medical system to offer much advice on nutrition as it is vastly ignored as it's main pillars it focuses are disease management, surgeries, and meds. Nor should one totally rely on bought out state and Federal gov't agencies.

    It's a gross misconception eating like a pig, ignoring that food is more than calories is without repercussions just because thru hikers or runners are highly active.
    Have to agree crappy diet off trail youlll have a crappy diet on trail.. I eat meat and yes vegtables.IT seems most say buy as you go unless you have a dietary requirment..Yeah its called not eating garbage. Such as a ton of sugar..I am ok with beans meat veggies..Do people go for the cheapest thing since they spent so much on gear wheres that figured in...I just take it as theyre ok eating aton of sugar. I Just joined Backpacking foodie and as you pointed out her meals are a vegan style but you can add your own meat to a dish . SEe how this improves recovery and output...
    My love for life is quit simple .i get uo in the moring and then i go to bed at night. What I do inbween is to occupy my time. Cary Grant

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by hobbs View Post
    Have to agree crappy diet off trail youlll have a crappy diet on trail.. I eat meat and yes vegtables.IT seems most say buy as you go unless you have a dietary requirment..Yeah its called not eating garbage. Such as a ton of sugar..I am ok with beans meat veggies..Do people go for the cheapest thing since they spent so much on gear wheres that figured in...I just take it as theyre ok eating aton of sugar. I Just joined Backpacking foodie and as you pointed out her meals are a vegan style but you can add your own meat to a dish . SEe how this improves recovery and output...
    The thing is, it's not real often you have access to a full service grocery store. So, a majority of your meals end up coming out of Dollar General stores, which are pretty much everywhere now. Knorr sides and tuna ends up being your main meal.
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  8. #28
    Registered User hobbs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slo-go'en View Post
    The thing is, it's not real often you have access to a full service grocery store. So, a majority of your meals end up coming out of Dollar General stores, which are pretty much everywhere now. Knorr sides and tuna ends up being your main meal.
    sl go en i do the same thing you do with chocalte milk when i hit a store lots of protein and it repairs mucles.I did the resupply in Dollar general ITs hit or miss. SO I am back to making meals before hand and shipping them., Before people say you have no choice in your meals.WEll when I was in the military I had zero choice in my food.SO I can deal with shipping. Like I said did it come down to price or was it easy way out...
    My love for life is quit simple .i get uo in the moring and then i go to bed at night. What I do inbween is to occupy my time. Cary Grant

  9. #29

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    [QUOTE=Dogwood;2284994. At least 6 if not all 10 of the 10 top causes of death in the U.S. are linked to dietary causality. .[/QUOTE]

    While I agree with you on the nature of reasonable nutrition, let’s face it...the real cause of all death is being born.

  10. #30
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    It is tempting to think that you can get away with eating junk when exercising so much every day, but the “calories in/calories out” concept is flawed especially for middle aged and older people (I’m 47). I was ignorant of this for a long time. Fortunately my recent blood work shows no sign of diabetes although it does run in my family. Avoiding highly processed foods and sugar is difficult in typical resupply locations but you can usually purchase nuts or jerky rather than chips or candy. And the initial food taken from home to the trail can be high quality. Even energy bars are on a spectrum - I like the Lara bars since they have just a few simple ingredients but even those are loaded with sugar. Thru hiking a long trail just isn’t possible right now for me but this gives me time to try to refine a better diet on short trips. I suspect that using mail drops will be part of my strategy despite the downsides with respect to flexibility.

  11. #31
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    One incident I recall clearly was on my long section hike of the PCT (Mexican border though the high Sierra). I had a lousy diet full of carbs and sugar. At the end of a very long day, I had the genius idea of eating a bag of skittles which predictably spiked my blood sugar for short term energy. I then totally bonked and could go no further and had to sit on a rock for a half hour before proceeding. Other than at the end of a marathon, I’d never bonked like that before!

    Off trail I have tried to minimize carbs which isn’t easy to do on a mostly vegetarian diet. I stay in shape by running 35-40 miles per week.

  12. #32
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    One incident I recall clearly was on my long section hike of the PCT (Mexican border though the high Sierra). I had a lousy diet full of carbs and sugar. At the end of a very long day, I had the genius idea of eating a bag of skittles which predictably spiked my blood sugar for short term energy. I then totally bonked and could go no further and had to sit on a rock for a half hour before proceeding. Other than at the end of a marathon, Iíd never bonked like that before!

    Off trail I have tried to minimize carbs which isnít easy to do on a mostly vegetarian diet. I stay in shape by running 35-40 miles per week.

  13. #33

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    One observation I made during sectioning is that many of the resupply points in hiker towns tend to be Save A Lot/Family Dollar type stores located in low rent down towns. Just out on the outskirts of town there is usually a newer full service supermarket but it requires a long walk, a hitch or shuttle. My guess is the temptation is to just go the place that is easy.

    That just happened in Gorham NH, a Dollar General moved into a long vacant grocery store, its right in town next to the Post Office where thru hikers tend to visit. There is a somewhat better stocked Super Walmart just north of downtown but is long walk or a shuttle. Most of the AT hostels in town do shuttle to Walmart but my guess is a lot of folks will just go into Dollar General which is pretty well low grade fat and carbs city, no produce or fresh fruits and vegetables. I am definitely not holding a Super Walmart up as a shining example of healthy food but compared to a Dollar General its a major improvement. We do have a weekly farmers market and I see plenty of thru hikers taking advantage of it but its only one afternoon a week.

    Heading north on the AT out of Gorham, fresh fruit and produce is extremely rare. About the only places I can think of is in Rangeley Maine (still a hitch or shuttle from the AT crossing) or Stratton Maine. Most thrus by that point are low on bucks and expect they buy whatever is cheapest of the local stores limited selections and that is almost always highly processed carbs with the provision to add fat and milk. Those products have a shelf life or decades so no worry about them going bad while fresh veggies and fruit goes bad relatively quickly.

  14. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by HankIV View Post
    While I agree with you on the nature of reasonable nutrition, let’s face it...the real cause of all death is being born.
    Yes, life is a fatal disease. And it's sexually transmitted, at that.

  15. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by garlic08 View Post
    Yes, life is a fatal disease. And it's sexually transmitted, at that.
    So what you are suggesting is that the essence of our existence is sex and death?
    I like it. Kinda morbid and deep and not, all at the same time.
    I'm not lost. I'm exploring.

  16. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    Dont buy into hype BS that excuses problematic health consequences of the SAD, junk food binging, or the common AT dietary modality. They are excuses to further poor unhealthy off trail dietary habits/addictions(yes, there's this thing called eating disorders/eating behavioral addictions, maybe some have heard of it) on trail. It's not hard, bulky or shartty tasting to make healthier food choices at home and on trail particularly in the food abundant U.S. At least 6 if not all 10 of the 10 top causes of death in the U.S. are linked to dietary causality. These top 10 account for about 75% of all U.S. deaths. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/art...#heart-disease The consequences somehow don't suddenly magically disappear because one claims to be on a thru hike or is a hiker. This is blunt, but the health issues of the U.S. pop is partly a result of ignoring dietary quantity and quality evident in the most common diseases. And, don't expect the western medical system to offer much advice on nutrition as it is vastly ignored as it's main pillars it focuses are disease management, surgeries, and meds. Nor should one totally rely on bought out state and Federal gov't agencies.

    It's a gross misconception eating like a pig, ignoring that food is more than calories is without repercussions just because thru hikers or runners are highly active.
    Excellent book (also available in audio form) on this subject. Nearly all disease-related deaths in America are largely due to poor diet. The author, a physician, watched as his grandmother at age 66 with a triple bypass was told there was nothing more that could be done for her. She was sent home to die. Due to her participation in lifestyle transformation, she lived another 30 years!

    Nutritional studies are often quietly funded by the very organizations that have a stake in misinformation. Medical schools devote very little time to nutritional education. Whole Food Plant Based
    How Not to Die

  17. #37

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    If we are opening that can of worms, genetics and epigenetics is a big factor in lifespan. A person can be the paragon of health with perfect diet and if they have the wrong genes they are still likely to have a short life. Some folks with lousy health habits live to 100 with cigarette butt in their mouth.

  18. #38

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    My dad had a triple by-pass in his early 60's. At which time he finally quit smoking. He just turned 98 and still living on his own. My Mom lived to 90. Guess I got good genes

    Back to diet, one of my early LASH hikes I started out with mostly pasta, then switched to PB+J sandwiches for dinner, GORP for breakfast and lunch, with a Snickers bar for a mid afternoon pick me up. After I switched to PB+J, I stopped loosing weight.
    Follow slogoen on Instagram.

  19. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coffee View Post
    Off trail I have tried to minimize carbs which isn’t easy to do on a mostly vegetarian diet. I stay in shape by running 35-40 miles per week.
    Have you considered nut and seeds and their butters, avos, tofu/tempeh/seitan, EVOO, coconut oil/unsweetened coconut milk, edamame/black bean/chickpea/mushroom pasta. If after low carbs choose quality complex carbs that include overall high nutritional density as found in produce. And, if your a lacto ova vegetarian or pescatarian many other options come into play.

  20. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    Dont buy into hype BS that excuses problematic health consequences of the SAD, junk food binging, or the common AT dietary modality. They are excuses to further poor unhealthy off trail dietary habits/addictions(yes, there's this thing called eating disorders/eating behavioral addictions, maybe some have heard of it) on trail. It's not hard, bulky or shartty tasting to make healthier food choices at home and on trail particularly in the food abundant U.S. At least 6 if not all 10 of the 10 top causes of death in the U.S. are linked to dietary causality. These top 10 account for about 75% of all U.S. deaths. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/art...#heart-disease The consequences somehow don't suddenly magically disappear because one claims to be on a thru hike or is a hiker. This is blunt, but the health issues of the U.S. pop is partly a result of ignoring dietary quantity and quality evident in the most common diseases. And, don't expect the western medical system to offer much advice on nutrition as it is vastly ignored as it's main pillars it focuses are disease management, surgeries, and meds. Nor should one totally rely on bought out state and Federal gov't agencies.

    It's a gross misconception eating like a pig, ignoring that food is more than calories is without repercussions just because thru hikers or runners are highly active.

    You can't out hike or out exercise a crappy diet. Ask Jim Fixx. Oh wait, you can't. Google him. "The Father of the Running Movement." Died young, maybe 54? How? Massive heart attack due to his crappy diet despite "looking fit" and running marathons for years. He left a good looking corpse.

    3rd leading cause is medical error and 4th leading cause is prescription medication (excluding ODs). But yeah, most of the stuff that kills people these days is directly related to their diet.
    Last edited by One Half; 04-21-2021 at 19:12.
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