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  1. #1
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    Wink Stuck in the winter storm on the mountain for nine days Sarek / Sweden.

    A reminder to always bring the emergency transmitter, and the better avalanche shovel instead of the lighter one in plastic. It would be a wonderful long trip through Sarek / Sweden (northern Sweden). But ended up as something completely different. I got stuck in the tent without any opportunity to leave. It was the longest toughest storm I've ever been in.
    Incredibly psychic stressful, I am from Sweden but have subtitled it in English.


    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=zXVBK38-650

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    Amazing documentation, sir! You are tougher than most.
    I have a daughter living in Umeå; they do stuff like this, even hauling a wood burning stove for their tent. Climbing rock and ice, too. No thanks.

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    fun with your daughter, I just tried some ice climbing. But it seems really fun��Umeå is a wonderful place to live, close to the mountains.

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    Fun fact, our middle daughter lives in Umeo, too.

    Love your trip report, would be interesting to get more technical details about your stuff.
    Which tent? I saw only one single Z-Lite pad, you sure had another one to double up?
    Which stove? What kind of ski binding do you use?

    This winter, I did several trips to our local mountains which I belived were "hard" but look more like rides in a baby stroller compared with your trip.
    Congrats, that you made it OK!

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    I didn’t get the English subtitles, perhaps because I don’t have a U-tube acct. Not really needed the pictures is worth a million words. Brrrrr.

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    On the bottom-right of the screen there is a button to get the subtitles.
    Well worth the additional info.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Leo L. View Post
    Fun fact, our middle daughter lives in Umeo, too.

    Love your trip report, would be interesting to get more technical details about your stuff.
    Which tent? I saw only one single Z-Lite pad, you sure had another one to double up?
    Which stove? What kind of ski binding do you use?

    This winter, I did several trips to our local mountains which I belived were "hard" but look more like rides in a baby stroller compared with your trip.
    Congrats, that you made it OK!
    I have a Norwegian tent. It is a "Helsport fjellheimen X-Trem 3-camp" A pure winter tent, of model tunnel tent.

    I have a z-lite pad as a spare, and double with it if it is very cold. What I mainly sleep on is one "Exped Downmat 9 TT M"
    I think it's hard to find, but I managed to find a used one.
    It is durable and field maintainable because its separate inner tubes provide redundant security. Their welded seams are not stressed as air pressure is fully taken up by the fabric cover. If a tube is punctured, repair or replacement is easy. The air tubes of the Downmat TT 9 M by EXPED are available as spare parts. This revolutionary new mat generation is filled with a down.

    As a stove, I have a "Primus OmniLite Ti (Titan)" in a home-made stove stand. I have a small movie about the kitchen on my channel if you are interested, the drn is mostly built of cake tins.
    I enclose a link to the kitchen.https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=8PVEZyr-kd4&t

    As a ski binding I have "rottefella nnn bc magnum". I think they are very reliable.

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    Its a multifuel stove. I run the stove on petrol / petrol. I think it works best in the winter.

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    Thanks a lot!
    Obviously, you've put lots of thought and experience into your equipment. Love your kitchen stove, the way how you improved it over time.

    As for the ski binding, this seems to be something special for Scandinavia, doing "backcountry skiing" of a special kind, like, lots of walking, less so downhill riding.

    Thanks for sharing! Would love to sit with you talking gear for an evening...

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    Thank you so much ��. Yes my ski binding is not a good thing for downhill. I do summit hikes but have to take it very carefully when I go down.
    It would be really fun to try equipment that is better suited for downhill skiing that also works well in the valleys��
    Do you have any good tips? it is also important that the boots are warm. And that the stuff is light.

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    Thank you so much . Yes my ski binding is not a good thing for downhill. I do summit hikes but have to take it very carefully when I go down.
    It would be really fun to try equipment that is better suited for downhill skiing that also works well in the valleys.
    Do you have any good tips? it is also important that the boots are warm. And that the stuff is light.

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    Backcountry skiing (or, as we call it, Ski Touring) is very popular here in the Alps and its different from what you are doing, due to the landscape.
    Here we typically have ascents of 1000 - 1500 vertical meters per trip and that means the same height of downhill ride, which at the end is the reason why anybody bothers to hike up at all.
    There are a vast number of ski bindings available, and new models get marketed every year. The most advanced ones use the stiff plastic ski boot as part of the binding (similar to your Rottefella), and all models have a lock device for fixing the heel when going downhill, plus a 1-2-level climbing aid (climbing post) for going steep uphill tracks.

    Personally, I'm using a very old binding from the 80ties that originally got developed for the US Army, named Ramer.
    Its pretty lightweight, and very much idiot-proof.
    https://earnyourturns.com/13749/revi...uring-binding/
    It works with all DIN ski boots, and with many other sturdy mountain boots.


    Ski+tent_winter.JPG

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vandrafjäll View Post
    A reminder to always bring the emergency transmitter, and the better avalanche shovel instead of the lighter one in plastic. It would be a wonderful long trip through Sarek / Sweden (northern Sweden). But ended up as something completely different. I got stuck in the tent without any opportunity to leave. It was the longest toughest storm I've ever been in.
    Incredibly psychic stressful, I am from Sweden but have subtitled it in English.


    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=zXVBK38-650
    I enjoyed your post. I was wondering about that cook system now I"ll actually have to peek through your whole channel. But seems quite spacious and well built for that climate...
    My love for life is quit simple .i get uo in the moring and then i go to bed at night. What I do inbween is to occupy my time. Cary Grant

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    Thanks for all the info ) I will take a closer look at the different solutions. Your tent looks easy to pitch. What is the name of the model?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Leo L. View Post
    Backcountry skiing (or, as we call it, Ski Touring) is very popular here in the Alps and its different from what you are doing, due to the landscape.
    Here we typically have ascents of 1000 - 1500 vertical meters per trip and that means the same height of downhill ride, which at the end is the reason why anybody bothers to hike up at all.
    There are a vast number of ski bindings available, and new models get marketed every year. The most advanced ones use the stiff plastic ski boot as part of the binding (similar to your Rottefella), and all models have a lock device for fixing the heel when going downhill, plus a 1-2-level climbing aid (climbing post) for going steep uphill tracks.

    Personally, I'm using a very old binding from the 80ties that originally got developed for the US Army, named Ramer.
    Its pretty lightweight, and very much idiot-proof.
    https://earnyourturns.com/13749/revi...uring-binding/
    It works with all DIN ski boots, and with many other sturdy mountain boots.


    Ski+tent_winter.JPG
    Sorry for the double post. I'm still learning this forum.
    Thanks for all the info ) I will take a closer look at the different solutions. Your tent looks easy to pitch. What is the name of the model?

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by hobbs View Post
    I enjoyed your post. I was wondering about that cook system now I"ll actually have to peek through your whole channel. But seems quite spacious and well built for that climate...
    Thanks . Yes I am happy with the stove, stable and with a large pan. This means that I do not have to melt snow as often. I usually do it in the morning. Then I have water for a day.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vandrafjäll View Post
    ...
    Your tent looks easy to pitch. What is the name of the model?
    This tent is an Exped Venus II extreme, my winter tent.
    Pretty exoensive, high quality, and perfect for my need.
    Might be a bit too small for trips of the kind you are doing.

    The speciality of this tent is, that the inner and the fly are tied together so you only have one huge piece of nylon, and the poles.
    So you spread out the nylon on the ground, insert the poles (3 pcs) into the sleeves provided, insert the end of the poles into the end pockets of the nylon tension everything, then tie out the apex' and you're done.
    It takes reasonable less time to setup this tent than most other tents which have the inner and the fly in separate pieces. Might be of some advantage if you setup the tent in a somewhat tight situation.
    But then, my Exped tent if far inferior to your Helsport tent, when it comes to space and expedition quality.

    The stove and pot I'm using is pretty old stuff, the stove being an Austrian military issue Esbit.
    The Esbit works fine in 3 seasons for boiling water (tea, coffe, rehydrating food), but does a poor job for melting snow, and doesn't work for real cooking (which I don't do anyway).
    For further winter trips I' heading towards a car gas stove, just have to decide which one.
    As I have to carry all stuff in my pack (no sledge here) it needs to be pretty lightweight stuff.

    Sure love this discussion...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Leo L. View Post
    This tent is an Exped Venus II extreme, my winter tent.
    Pretty exoensive, high quality, and perfect for my need.
    Might be a bit too small for trips of the kind you are doing.

    The speciality of this tent is, that the inner and the fly are tied together so you only have one huge piece of nylon, and the poles.
    So you spread out the nylon on the ground, insert the poles (3 pcs) into the sleeves provided, insert the end of the poles into the end pockets of the nylon tension everything, then tie out the apex' and you're done.
    It takes reasonable less time to setup this tent than most other tents which have the inner and the fly in separate pieces. Might be of some advantage if you setup the tent in a somewhat tight situation.
    But then, my Exped tent if far inferior to your Helsport tent, when it comes to space and expedition quality.

    The stove and pot I'm using is pretty old stuff, the stove being an Austrian military issue Esbit.
    The Esbit works fine in 3 seasons for boiling water (tea, coffe, rehydrating food), but does a poor job for melting snow, and doesn't work for real cooking (which I don't do anyway).
    For further winter trips I' heading towards a car gas stove, just have to decide which one.
    As I have to carry all stuff in my pack (no sledge here) it needs to be pretty lightweight stuff.

    Sure love this discussion...
    Yes, now I recognize your tent, there is also a lighter version for less demanding conditions. My tent is also built so that the inner and the fly are tied together. In Sweden, almost all tents are so because of all the rain we have here . Yes, you must have light stuff when you carry everything on your back. But light gadgets can also be a security as it becomes easier / faster to move.

  19. #19
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    Sorry, Tipi. This guy has you beat, but I suspect that is only because the southern Appalachians don't have weather like northern Sweden.
    Trail Name - Slapshot
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    Vandrafjäll
    I was sad that you got hit by the bigger storm after moving out of the beautiful snow condominium. I like how you built it. I have dug snow caves and built a crude igloo, both way more work than your method. I did them for fun and didn't sleep in them yet. I'll try your method next winter!

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