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  1. #21
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    Yes from the bottom. As far as more effort I would say it probably is, with me for sure, but your splitting the energy with upper and lower strength rather then it all on your legs. I use my poles very heavily. Almost always strapped on and I take pictures/eat and do anything pretty much with them dangling there. If It's something real steep and/or a heavy rock scramble then I'll use them without the straps so I could switch to middle/bottom of the pole or put them down quick to use hands or whatever.
    NoDoz
    nobo 2018 March 10th - October 19th
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    I'm just one too many mornings and 1,000 miles behind

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alligator View Post
    Yeah, trekking poles weren't really much of a thing for hikers until about 2000-2005, at least not in the States. You got snide comments for using them, guess it goes both ways. . . I guess you were an early adopter. . .
    Oh gosh no. I don't disagree with your date estimates of the adoption of trekking poles. I grew up Nordic skiing and I'm apparently generalizing across disciplines that use poles with straps. I wasn't willing to "humble myself" and use trekking poles until I got old enough and broken enough that I had no choice but to use them to do the hiking and climbing I wanted to do. In this case it was August 21st, 2011 to climb the South Sister in Oregon. Since then I've become a devoted convert. Egos can be a fickle, stupid thing.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonnycat View Post
    I think some men have the wisdom to ignore conversations they feel are beneath them instead of mocking those who willingly expose their ignorance in an effort to understand a new concept.
    I certainly can see how what I wrote could be taken as mocking. It wasn't intended that way. I apologize to anyone that felt mocked by my previous post(s). I quite respect "stupid questions" as I do not believe there is ever an honest question that is stupid. Not asking it and staying nave is the stupid part. I was sharing my surprise that this was a legitimate discussion among people with some significant experience, as it was never a debate in the world of Nordic skiing where hands up through the bottom of the straps is pretty much one of the first things everyone learns. And, I always considered Nordic Skiing the predecessor of trekking pole use.

    On another completely different note: the safety issue. Hands up through the bottom doesn't so much protect wrists during a fall. Catching yourself with your hands with or without trekking poles risks spraining or other wise hurting your wrist. The most widely expressed concern regarding safety is that hands up through the bottom significantly reduces the likelihood of a Bennett's Fracture, which is caused by the thumb being bent back sharply and is all too common with people using pole straps with hands down through from the top.
    I'm not lost. I'm exploring.

  3. #23
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    Yes from the bottom. As far as more effort I would say it probably is, with me for sure, but your splitting the energy with upper and lower strength rather then it all on your legs. I use my poles very heavily. Almost always strapped on and I take pictures/eat and do anything pretty much with them dangling there. If It's something real steep and/or a heavy rock scramble then I'll use them without the straps so I could switch to middle/bottom of the pole or put them down quick to use hands or whatever.
    NoDoz
    nobo 2018 March 10th - October 19th
    -
    I'm just one too many mornings and 1,000 miles behind

  4. #24
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    sorry don't know how that just happen
    NoDoz
    nobo 2018 March 10th - October 19th
    -
    I'm just one too many mornings and 1,000 miles behind

  5. #25

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    Here are a couple of video showing how to put your hand up through the straps. Leki should know the best way to do it.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x1h_...annel=LEKILEKI

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HOQF...ventureBuddies
    If you don't stand for something, you will fall for anything.

  6. #26

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    Another up through the bottom here. Unlike the picture, I rarely fully grip the poles. The benefit (one of them anyways) of going up from the bottom is that a light pinch grip with the thumb and forefinger is all that's needed on the pole; the strap under the meaty part of the hand handles the weight load. In case of a trip, when you "plant" the pole to catch yourself, the amount of support you get isn't limited by grip strength.

    Like many others have said, I started using poles going in from the top. When someone suggested I try the other way, I've never gone back.

    P.S. Going up from the bottom, when you release the pole, it drops away from your hands, freeing them to take pics, use your hands to read a map, eat a snack, etc.

  7. #27
    Garlic
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    I can't believe this thread went 22 posts before someone mentioned Nordic skiing. When you use poles for propulsion, it's by far the best way. You actually hold the pole with only your thumb and forefinger, and only through half the stride. You let the pole go and throw it back behind you, flicking the wrist for the last bit of propulsion, then retrieve it as you wind up for the next stride. The grip remains relaxed.

    Of course, many hikers don't actually use the poles for propulsion, but for support and balance, and then it really doesn't matter as much. But I'd still argue for the Nordic way, if only to be able to relax the grip. I have calluses on my palms from the straps from decades of Nordic skiing.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by MtDoraDave View Post
    Another up through the bottom here. Unlike the picture, I rarely fully grip the poles.
    The picture was intended to show only where the strap lies on the hand (cradling the wrist vs surrounding the hand), not the usage dynamic, which would probably have required a video.

  9. #29
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    "Of course, many hikers don't actually use the poles for propulsion, but for support and balance, and then it really doesn't matter as much. But I'd still argue for the Nordic way, if only to be able to relax the grip. I have calluses on my palms from the straps from decades of Nordic skiing.'


    It still does make a difference for safety.
    If you are falling you can just open your hand (let go of the pole) and the pole will slide off, however it will not happen if the strap is under your wrist.



  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Franco View Post
    "It still does make a difference for safety.

    If you are falling you can just open your hand (let go of the pole) and the pole will slide off, however it will not happen if the strap is under your wrist.
    Well, the few times I have fallen with my poles I just took them down with me so it wasn't a problem. I guess if one were to stick it very firmly in the ground before they fell and it wouldn't budge it would be an issue, but I have never experienced that.

    -----

    I wanted to follow up on this thread with my musings on the poles that I got. My criteria were folding poles (for traveling). Least impressive were the Black Diamond poles (Distance FLZ and Alpine FLZ). I also tried some Leki Micro-Vario CorTec TA poles, but the straps were just too flimsy for me. I ended up getting a pair of Komperdell (TI Trailstick C7 Vario) poles from REI Outlet for $100 on sale and with the 20% anniversary discount; the straps are perfect and they are just a few grams heavier than my old Rossignol poles. They also come with a three year "no matter the cause" warranty which I appreciate.

    I did consider the Komperdell all carbon fiber poles because they were an ounce lighter per pole, but although I have never "bent" a pole (flexed them, but they always returned to being straight on their own), I don't have any experience with CF poles and decided against it.

    As to the topic, I still prefer the old "cradle the wrist" feeling of the old poles, but I think I will be able to adjust to the new technique.

    Thanks to everyone for your comments, they are appreciated!

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