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  1. #21
    Some days, it's not worth chewing through the restraints.
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    Quote Originally Posted by LittleRock View Post
    I've been concerned about this also for the parts of the AT where there are wooden tent pads instead of dirt tent sites. Does tying the tent down with rocks work fairly well there?
    There are lots of tricks with cord and stakes, and purpose-made items like these (Google fishbone tent anchors):

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by LittleRock View Post
    I've been concerned about this also for the parts of the AT where there are wooden tent pads instead of dirt tent sites. Does tying the tent down with rocks work fairly well there?

    Aside: Once, in PA, I was unable to find any usable rocks for staking near my tent. I walked back out to the trail and immediately had my choice of several good ones.
    Yes, I think I heard finding rocks on the AT in PA isn't much of a problem . ?

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deadeye View Post
    So if it's that much of a concern get a free-standing tent. Not trying to be a wise guy, just seems like the thing to do. Lots of lightweight options, particularly if you use trekking poles. TarpTent has several options that will keep you under 2 1/2 pounds, there must be others. I have a Rainbow, it can be set up totally freestanding with 2 trekking poles. I only use one pole, but even then I have lots of options.
    By "free-standing", I mean a tent that doesn't need trekking poles.
    And, yes, that trade-off -- back to the free-standing-- is the ultimate question: Do I want to accept that extra weight (the pole) for the peace-of-mind....

  4. #24
    GSMNP 900 Miler
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    Quote Originally Posted by jefals View Post
    The Sierras is the area I was thinking of too.
    When I was on the JMT, finding good rocks to use was never an issue when I was above treeline.

  5. #25
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jefals View Post
    Well, you might die. If your down sleeping bag gets drenched ...could be big trouble.
    A. Iíll take my chances.
    B. Thatís what the poncho is for.
    C. Youíre carrying a tent & paracord. Rig a tarp arrangement between trees or bushes.
    D. Think outside of the Box!
    Wayne

  6. #26

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    My trips are predominately in the Sierras and in many cases above tree line. I switched from a Tarptent to a Free standing tent. Part of the reason was that (IMO) non-freestanding tents tend to need a larger area to stake out (not all, but mine did). Combined with choosing a flat spot and being out of the wind, it tends to limit the places that you can pitch a tent. Coupled with the rocky substrates of the Sierra, I found that it has been much easier to set up (and move/optimize) tent locations. My 2 cents.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by HooKooDooKu View Post
    When I was on the JMT, finding good rocks to use was never an issue when I was above treeline.
    Definitely true. A lot of previously used campsites also have convenient rocks just for this purpose. The trail is full of zPacks and other similar trekking pole supported shelters.

  8. #28
    Some days, it's not worth chewing through the restraints.
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    Quote Originally Posted by jefals View Post
    And, yes, that trade-off -- back to the free-standing-- is the ultimate question: Do I want to accept that extra weight (the pole) for the peace-of-mind....
    Sounds like the price you pay to have more options. I usually use a hammock, but carry a pad in case there are no handy trees or I want to (or have to) sleep in a shelter.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coffee View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by HooKooDooKu View Post
    When I was on the JMT, finding good rocks to use was never an issue when I was above treeline.
    Definitely true. A lot of previously used campsites also have convenient rocks just for this purpose. The trail is full of zPacks and other similar trekking pole supported shelters.
    Yes, I believe that too, on the JMT. Not necessarily so thruout the Sierras. I've camped on the TRT in places where I've had a hard time finding a few small rocks..

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by flatcatgear View Post
    My trips are predominately in the Sierras and in many cases above tree line. I switched from a Tarptent to a Free standing tent. Part of the reason was that (IMO) non-freestanding tents tend to need a larger area to stake out (not all, but mine did). Combined with choosing a flat spot and being out of the wind, it tends to limit the places that you can pitch a tent. Coupled with the rocky substrates of the Sierra, I found that it has been much easier to set up (and move/optimize) tent locations. My 2 cents.
    Great information. Really focused on what I'm thinking also. I went the other way: From a free-standing (Brooks Range Foray) to a Tarptent Strato Li. Yes, that tarptent is definitely a bigger footprint - which is another concern. The Brooks Range is a strong tent but really small. I like all that space inside the tarptent - but I have the same concerns you mentioned. That Strato Li might not be the best option for that area.

  11. #31
    Garlic
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    Quote Originally Posted by flatcatgear View Post
    ...Part of the reason was that (IMO) non-freestanding tents tend to need a larger area to stake out...
    That is often a factor especially in a group.

    Another factor not mentioned is simplicity and reliability. Non-freestanding tents tend to be simpler with fewer parts to lose or break. I've been in groups where both have happened. And I witnessed an eye injury caused by a bent hoop pole springing back out of control.

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