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  1. #1
    Registered User JPritch's Avatar
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    Default Gas Canister Shortage?

    I'm seeing reports online of a shortage of gas canisters, especially the smaller sizes. I haven't checked retail in a while as I stocked up on 110g canisters a couple years ago, but I'm about to go on a LASH and I can't mail them to me. Wondering what you all are seeing (or not) out there?
    It is what it is.

  2. #2

    Default

    I thought you could mail gas canisters if you marked them ground only?

  3. #3

    Default

    I am certain this has been covered elsewhere, but isobutane can be mailed if it is in the appropriate metal canister, less than 1 L capacity, and appropriately labelled. The applicable USPS regulations are:

    342.22 Mailable Gases

    The following are examples of mailable gases:

    1. Butane. Butane (UN1011) and Receptacles, small (UN2037) with butane or butane mixtures are Division 2.1 flammable gases. Butane gases that qualify as a Limited Quantity surface material are acceptable only in domestic mail via surface transportation when properly prepared under 342.3 and Packaging Instruction 2A in Appendix C.

    342.3 Packaging

    Mailable compressed gases must be packaged to protect valves and fittings and to ensure integrity of the primary receptacle during transport. Containers must use recessed valves, screw thread caps, tap closures, or other means to prevent accidental discharge.
    The following conditions apply:

    1. Nonmetal Containers. A mailable gas is acceptable in an other–than–metal primary receptacle if the water capacity is 4 fluid ounces (7.22 cubic inches) or less. Packaging Instruction 2A or 2B, as applicable, must be followed.
    2. Metal Containers. Mailable nonflammable and flammable compressed gases are acceptable in metal primary receptacles thathave a water capacity up to 33.8 fluid ounces (1 liter or 61.0 cubic inches). The liquid content of the material and the gas must not completely fill the primary receptacle at 130° F (55° C). Additionally, the following apply:
      1. A DOT 2P container must be used if the internal pressure is from 140 psig to 160 psig at 130° F (55° C).
      2. A DOT 2Q container must be used if the pressure is from 161 psig to 180 psig at 130° F (55° C).
      3. Packaging Instruction 2A or 2B, as applicable, must be followed.


    3. A container with an internal pressure over 180 psig at 130° F (55° C) is prohibited from mailing.
    4. Flammable Gases. A mailable flammable compressed gas is restricted to 4 fluid ounces in a nonmetal primary receptacle or 33.8 fluid ounces (1 liter) in a metal primary receptacle per mailpiece Packaging Instruction 2A must be followed.
    5. Nonflammable Gases. A mailable nonflammable gas is permitted in individual 4 fluid ounce nonmetal primary receptacles or 33.8 fluid ounce (1 liter) metal primary receptacles. Multiple primary receptacles may be securely packed within a single, strong outer packaging. Each mailpiece must not exceed a total weight of 25 pounds. Packaging Instruction 2B must be followed.

    USPS Packaging Instruction 2A

    Flammable Gases

    A Class 2, Division 2.1 flammable gas that qualifies as a Limited Quantity surface material is mailable provided that all applicable requirements in 342 are met and it is properly packaged as follows.
    Proper Shipping Name

    • Consumer Commodity.

    ID Number

    • Various (see Appendix A).

    Mailability

    • International Mail: Prohibited.
    • Domestic Mail: Permitted only via surface transportation.

    Required Packaging

    Primary Receptacle

    • The capacity of an other–than–metal (nonmetal) primary receptacle must be 4 fluid ounces (7.22 cubic inches) or less per mailpiece.
    • The capacity of a metal primary receptacle must be 33.8 fluid ounces (1–liter or 61.0 cubic inches) or less per mailpiece.
    • The liquid content of the material and the gas must not completely fill the primary receptacle at 130° F.
    • A DOT 2P container must be used if the internal pressure is from 140 psig to 160 psig at 130° F (55° C). A DOT 2Q container must be used if the pressure is from 161 psig to 180 psig at 130° F (55° C).
    • A container with an internal pressure more than 180 psig at 130° F (55° C) is prohibited from mailing.
    • Primary receptacles must have recessed valves, screw–thread caps, tap closures, or other means to prevent accidental discharge. Valves and fittings must be protected to ensure the integrity of the receptacle during transport.

    Cushioning Material

    • Sufficient cushioning material must surround the primary receptacle to absorb shock and prevent damage.

    Outer Packaging

    • Strong outer packaging that is capable of firmly and securely holding the primary receptacle and cushioning material is required.
    • Multiple primary receptacles may be securely packed within a single strong outer packaging, provided the total volume of flammable gas does not exceed 33.8 fluid ounces (1 liter) per mailpiece.

    Marking

    Labels and markings must be placed on the address side of the mailpiece unless specified differently in 221.1 and 325.1.

    • The outer packaging must bear an approved DOT Limited Quantity surface mark designating surface transportation, prepared under 342.4b.
    • A complete return and delivery address must be used.



    Medical professional, semi-professional Scouter, aspiring layabout.
    "If it's stupid, and it works - it's not stupid."

  4. #4
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    Default

    Take a canister to your post office.
    Pay attention to the poster showing the labels and packaging for gas canisters. Discuss your situation with the post people.
    I remember this coming up before. The problem was that the warning labels could only be purchased in mass quantities and were very expensive. Perhaps there’s a work around for an individual mailing a few canisters.
    Or seek out a SVEA 123 stove, SIGG fuel bottle and some Coleman Fuel. You can’t have mine!
    Wayne

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Venchka View Post
    Take a canister to your post office.
    Pay attention to the poster showing the labels and packaging for gas canisters. Discuss your situation with the post people.
    I remember this coming up before. The problem was that the warning labels could only be purchased in mass quantities and were very expensive. Perhaps there’s a work around for an individual mailing a few canisters.
    Or seek out a SVEA 123 stove, SIGG fuel bottle and some Coleman Fuel. You can’t have mine!
    Wayne
    Not sure that this is terribly expensive ... $16.04 USD for a roll of 500

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08B1TZX1J...C5ATGDD5VWPFER
    Medical professional, semi-professional Scouter, aspiring layabout.
    "If it's stupid, and it works - it's not stupid."

  6. #6
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    Default

    I suppose not.
    Offer lots of 10 on WhiteBlaze for $2.50?
    Cheers!
    Wayne

  7. #7
    Registered User One Half's Avatar
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    Default

    I haven't seen any shortages. Where will you be hiking?
    https://tinyurl.com/MyFDresults

    A vigorous five-mile walk will do more good for an unhappy but otherwise healthy adult than all the medicine and psychology in the world. ~Paul Dudley White

  8. #8
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
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    Default

    Why not there's a shortage of everything else! And if you do find it, it will cost you twice as much as the last time you bought one!

  9. #9

    Default

    I work for an outfitter. We carry four different brands of Iso-butane. I have seen each of those brands go cold over the last two years of supply chain issues, but we have not run out at any time. I will say that the last day I worked we had less than 6 cans of 4 oz. fuel, only one brand, but still had boatloads of the larger sizes.

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Venchka View Post
    I suppose not.
    Offer lots of 10 on WhiteBlaze for $2.50?
    Cheers!
    Wayne
    I have enough labels to make that offer available. This is what the label looks like:


  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Venchka View Post
    Or seek out a SVEA 123 stove, SIGG fuel bottle and some Coleman Fuel. You can’t have mine!
    Wayne
    On the trail it’s probably easier to find canisters, or alcohol, than Coleman fuel.

  12. #12
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    Default

    Carry a kerosene jet. Gas stations in the mountains have a kerosene pump.
    Wayne

  13. #13

    Default

    Pretty much all of them made at one factory in Korea.

  14. #14

    Default

    strike - forgot to quote post
    Medical professional, semi-professional Scouter, aspiring layabout.
    "If it's stupid, and it works - it's not stupid."

  15. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by zelph View Post
    I have enough labels to make that offer available. This is what the label looks like:

    You also need the black-on-white "square on point" diamond labels now per USPS regulations. The ORM-D labels alone are no longer sufficient.
    Medical professional, semi-professional Scouter, aspiring layabout.
    "If it's stupid, and it works - it's not stupid."

  16. #16

    Default

    You also need the black-on-white "square on point" diamond labels now per USPS regulations. The ORM-D labels alone are no longer sufficient.
    Bummer, always changing things

  17. #17

    Default

    OP could change to denatured alcohol stove? That’s a plenty, for sure

  18. #18
    Registered User
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    Default

    I work at an REI in Austin, TX. We have been limiting Isopro sales to one per person for nearly a year. Often we have been completely out for 2 or 3 weeks at a time. A shipment will arrive and we will sell out quickly. Thankfully, we this week we received many cans of Isopro (just in time for the Anniversary sale which begins today). Still, one per person.

  19. #19

  20. #20

    Default

    My local REI in Woodland Hills CA (just north of LA) had all sizes in stock. Not all brands but all sizes.

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