WhiteBlaze Pages 2022
A Complete Appalachian Trail Guidebook.
$5 for printable PDF, AVAILABLE NOW. $9 for interactive PDF(smartphone version)
Read more here WhiteBlaze Pages Store

Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-15-2022
    Location
    Williamsville, New York
    Age
    55
    Posts
    31

    Default Smarter than the average bear.

    Hang your pack and your food they said...
    It will be safe they said...
    Attached Images Attached Images
    I did it. I said I'd do it and I've done it. ~Grandma Gatewood
    "When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace". ~Jimi Hendrix

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    07-23-2022
    Location
    Anderson, South Carolina
    Posts
    43

    Default

    I actually want to try hiking sections without carrying food and just eat in towns. I think I can do it and cover more miles.

  3. #3
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-23-2019
    Location
    Harpers ferry wv.
    Age
    58
    Posts
    1,893

    Default

    You should at least take some tuna and corn pasta.
    Maybe some sardines?

  4. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-14-2020
    Location
    Evanston IL
    Age
    59
    Posts
    471
    Images
    4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Birthright View Post
    I actually want to try hiking sections without carrying food and just eat in towns. I think I can do it and cover more miles.
    You probably can, but you will also burn a bunch of time waiting for shuttle drivers on both ends (or waiting for hitches) and coordination to restaurant hours in little country towns. Just something to factor into that plan.

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Birthright View Post
    I actually want to try hiking sections without carrying food and just eat in towns. I think I can do it and cover more miles.
    You are going to get mighty hungry in NH and Maine

  6. #6
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-12-2012
    Location
    Northwest Georgia
    Age
    63
    Posts
    29

    Default

    This reminds me of a bear in the Cohutta Wilderness years ago, climbed up the oak tree near camp where my food bag was 'properly' hung by 40 feet of Dyneema rope over the middle of a white water rapids in the Jacks River. The bear of about 300 pounds spent 3 solid hours chewing on the 6 inch limb where it met the main trunk of the tree, after which of course, weakened the limb enough to droop it down, jumping off the tree onto the limb and bag, ripping the bag open all while washing downstream abount 100 yards. It was a long way out on an empty stomach. I since have 2 bear canisters. It is common place to get laughted at or condemned for the 'weight.' My response after 50 years of backpacking, "if you can't handle a couple of pounds to insure a guarantee, maybe you don't need to be out here."

  7. #7
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-14-2020
    Location
    Evanston IL
    Age
    59
    Posts
    471
    Images
    4

    Default

    I used an Ursack, with Opsacks on my thru last summer. Did notice the Opsacks would sometimes unseal overnight, you have to be diligent with them. Used bear boxes and cables where provided. Numerous times found a snack item that I had forgotten in my pack in the morning.

    No bears or critters in 4.5 months. Didn’t hear any other hikers tell a tale of losing their food to a bear either. I know it does happen.

    At least along the AT, I think this is a low probability/high impact event. Obviously for the bears ( a fed bear is a dead bear), and for the hiker losing their food. An AT hiker can almost always hit a resupply/regroup point in half a day. So not THAT much impact.

    So I felt the Ursack was a good combination of further risk reduction and weight.

    As a SOBO, I camped/sheltered alone probably a third of my nights south of Hudson,perhaps that improved my odds, by there being less mass of food smell to attract. And perhaps being down south in the fall when bears have fattened up, AND are being hunted, helps as well.

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-15-2022
    Location
    Williamsville, New York
    Age
    55
    Posts
    31

    Default Better sense of smell than a bloodhound

    Quote Originally Posted by HankIV View Post
    I used an Ursack, with Opsacks on my thru last summer. Did notice the Opsacks would sometimes unseal overnight, you have to be diligent with them. Used bear boxes and cables where provided. Numerous times found a snack item that I had forgotten in my pack in the morning.

    No bears or critters in 4.5 months. Didnt hear any other hikers tell a tale of losing their food to a bear either. I know it does happen.

    At least along the AT, I think this is a low probability/high impact event. Obviously for the bears ( a fed bear is a dead bear), and for the hiker losing their food. An AT hiker can almost always hit a resupply/regroup point in half a day. So not THAT much impact.

    So I felt the Ursack was a good combination of further risk reduction and weight.

    As a SOBO, I camped/sheltered alone probably a third of my nights south of Hudson,perhaps that improved my odds, by there being less mass of food smell to attract. And perhaps being down south in the fall when bears have fattened up, AND are being hunted, helps as well.
    nps.gov/yose/blogs/bear-series-part-one-a-bears-sense-of-smell-htm
    I did it. I said I'd do it and I've done it. ~Grandma Gatewood
    "When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace". ~Jimi Hendrix

  9. #9
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-15-2022
    Location
    Williamsville, New York
    Age
    55
    Posts
    31

    Default New link

    Quote Originally Posted by The Miracle Man View Post
    nps.gov/yose/blogs/bear-series-part-one-a-bears-sense-of-smell-htm
    bear.org/senses-and-abilities

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by The Miracle Man View Post
    nps.gov/yose/blogs/bear-series-part-one-a-bears-sense-of-smell-htm
    Couldn’t get that link to work. This one does.

    https://www.nps.gov/yose/blogs/bear-...e-of-smell.htm

  11. #11
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-14-2020
    Location
    Evanston IL
    Age
    59
    Posts
    471
    Images
    4

    Default

    Understood. I still think a spring thru bubble campsite with 20 food bags will be more attractive than a solo camp; all else being equal. Or put another way, more wild source of food will out compete one food bag than 20

  12. #12
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-15-2022
    Location
    Williamsville, New York
    Age
    55
    Posts
    31

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by No Match View Post
    This reminds me of a bear in the Cohutta Wilderness years ago, climbed up the oak tree near camp where my food bag was 'properly' hung by 40 feet of Dyneema rope over the middle of a white water rapids in the Jacks River. The bear of about 300 pounds spent 3 solid hours chewing on the 6 inch limb where it met the main trunk of the tree, after which of course, weakened the limb enough to droop it down, jumping off the tree onto the limb and bag, ripping the bag open all while washing downstream abount 100 yards. It was a long way out on an empty stomach. I since have 2 bear canisters. It is common place to get laughted at or condemned for the 'weight.' My response after 50 years of backpacking, "if you can't handle a couple of pounds to insure a guarantee, maybe you don't need to be out here."
    Quote Originally Posted by HankIV View Post
    Understood. I still think a spring thru bubble campsite with 20 food bags will be more attractive than a solo camp; all else being equal. Or put another way, more wild source of food will out compete one food bag than 20
    Oh I hear ya Hank. A big gob of 20 people are absolutely going to collectively have a large amount of food. That is bound to attract the attention of a problem bear. There is also no way to guarantee or expext that the entire group will practice and maintain adequate food control discipline. A solo hiker has 100% control over food security issues concerning animals. I am going SoBo solo with a bear vault and will be observing precautions with food. Bears really don't concern me anyway, deer ticks do, very much.
    I did it. I said I'd do it and I've done it. ~Grandma Gatewood
    "When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace". ~Jimi Hendrix

++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •