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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sarcasm the elf View Post
    I killed hundreds of SLFs on trail in Northern PA last October. It got so bad that I had to stop because it was taking up so much time that it was messing up my itinerary.
    Thanks so much for your efforts! Sounds depressing and disgusting—but hopefully gratifying!

  2. #22
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lauriep View Post
    If you've got a lot of them on your property, apparently the latest recommendation is to trap them, rather than employing a sticky band as previously recommended (too much collateral damage?) Here's how to build one: How to Build a New Style Spotted Lanternfly Circle Trap. (This comes from the PennState Extension, which is considered the leading authority, I believe, at this time.)

    As for larger scale, I haven't yet heard about spraying being employed as has been done for Gypsy moth/Spongy moth (although I haven't looked into that specifically). However, I do know Harpers Ferry National Historical Park (which covers more than 3,600 acres in West Virginia, Maryland, and Virginia) is undertaking a multi-year project to greatly reduce the number of Spotted Lanternfly host trees (Tree-of-Heaven/Ailanthus altissima) in the park. I think the goal is to eventually reduce the number of trees by 80%.

    One thing I haven't yet learned is how much removing Tree-of-Heaven impacts the Spotted Lanternfly population. The lanternfly will feed on over 70 different other plant species even if Tree-of-Heaven is preferred. Regardless, controlling the highly invasive exotic Tree-of-Heaven is definitely worthwhile as it "produces an overly abundant amount of seeds, crowds out native species with its dense thickets and secretes a chemical into the soil that is toxic to surrounding plants" according to one source.
    Thank you good information I'll pass it on . I only found a few but a buddy of mine from work lives not to far and has a farm and garden and bees etc but he said he'd been seeing them by the hundreds. That's a pretty aggressive move removing all them trees. I was reading that link and they mentioned grape vines there's alot of grape vine farmers in northern VA ,alot of $ investment I wonder what they're doing.
    And if we have spray for the gypsy moth why are they still eating up all the rest like peakbagger explains?

  3. #23
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
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    Darn, trees like peakbagger explains

  4. #24
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
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    If all that's true about the tree of heaven it sounds like an invasive species in itself like the Virginia creeper. And named changed to tree of hell!

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by JNI64 View Post
    If all that's true about the tree of heaven it sounds like an invasive species in itself like the Virginia creeper. And named changed to tree of hell!
    Yes, Tree of Heaven is bad—a highly invasive non-native tree—and should probably be renamed! That webinar about the Spotted Lanternfly and Tree of Heaven is now online at youtu.be/GyLqPPWMPFA if you want to learn more about the two of them.

    By the way, Virginia Creeper can be very aggressive, so I'm told. However, it is native. Where I live outside Harpers Ferry, the deer are so overabundant that mostly because of them invasive exotic species have taken over in most areas. Virginia Creeper is one of the very few native plants deer don't care much for. However, when the deer have eaten all the native plants to their liking they will eat almost any native plant they might otherwise find distasteful. For that reason I treasure Virginia Creeper and do everything I can to encourage it on my property.

    These days I think the favored terminology is to describe a native plant that grows prolifically as "aggressive" and an exotic/non-native plant that grows prolifically as "invasive."

    Not sure I agree with that, though. Here, again because of the deer, the native Paw Paw tree has completely taken over the understory because it's about the only native tree or shrub that deer won't eat. It sure seems like they are "invading" our woods, even if they aren't a foreign invader. No other native tree species now seems to have a chance of germinating between the deer eating the saplings and the deep shade that Paw Paws create.

  6. #26
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
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    Yall don't tell anyone but I'm at work and getting paid to Whiteblaze
    Anyway ok it's now known as the tree of hell. Thanks for the link I'll watch it when I have an hour to kill probably this weekend.
    You are a wealth of information we're learning so much here.
    I heard the praying mantis eats the SLF , so we just have to get a billion of them and drop by helicopter. And yes it's an aggression not an invasion.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by JNI64 View Post
    Yall don't tell anyone but I'm at work and getting paid to Whiteblaze
    Anyway ok it's now known as the tree of hell. Thanks for the link I'll watch it when I have an hour to kill probably this weekend.
    You are a wealth of information we're learning so much here.
    I heard the praying mantis eats the SLF , so we just have to get a billion of them and drop by helicopter. And yes it's an aggression not an invasion.
    I'm just glad you care!

  8. #28
    Wanna-be hiker trash
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    That's one enjoyable way to get rid of them.

    https://www.instagram.com/reel/CiJOq...d=YmMyMTA2M2Y=
    Colorless green ideas sleep furiously.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sarcasm the elf View Post
    That's one enjoyable way to get rid of them.

    https://www.instagram.com/reel/CiJOq...d=YmMyMTA2M2Y=
    Whack em and stack em!

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