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  1. #1
    Registered User Lithopath's Avatar
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    Default Foot abuse on trails on AT

    2020 AT Hikers-

    where did you find the toughest trail conditions on your feet?

    leave your thoughts

    ~Old Oriskany

  2. #2
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    Pa rocks, I live and hike in the whites where there are lots of rocks but when I step on them I have reasonable expectation that the rock is not going anywhere. In the rocky sections of PA it seems the opposite, step on rock and its probably going to move.

  3. #3
    Registered User One Half's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by peakbagger View Post
    Pa rocks, I live and hike in the whites where there are lots of rocks but when I step on them I have reasonable expectation that the rock is not going anywhere. In the rocky sections of PA it seems the opposite, step on rock and its probably going to move.
    Is that foot abuse or more like ankle/lower leg abuse?
    There are large rocks which are generally "better" IMO for stepping on unless they happen to be on steep downhills where you end up with "higher impact" on the feet. Although, regardless of direction there is a certain size of rock, not as small as gravel and not large enough for the whole foot, where you can only get maybe 1/2 your foot on at a time, which I think are the most abusive of rocks. And then there's the sections where any rock you have to step on seems to have a "pointy" area facing up versus something more flat. Them pointy ones are the most abusive I think.
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  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by One Half View Post
    Is that foot abuse or more like ankle/lower leg abuse?
    There are large rocks which are generally "better" IMO for stepping on unless they happen to be on steep downhills where you end up with "higher impact" on the feet. Although, regardless of direction there is a certain size of rock, not as small as gravel and not large enough for the whole foot, where you can only get maybe 1/2 your foot on at a time, which I think are the most abusive of rocks. And then there's the sections where any rock you have to step on seems to have a "pointy" area facing up versus something more flat. Them pointy ones are the most abusive I think.
    It sounds like you are both describing the PA I remember. It was sorta like the rocks were trying to bite you sometimes.

  5. #5
    Registered User LittleRock's Avatar
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    Recovering from plantar fascitis, I find the trail sections that give my feet the most difficulties are the steep uphill sections. I have no problem when there are stairs or flat places to step, but when the trail is basically a 30-degree incline it is really tough on my feet. On the other hand, steep downhills are tougher on the knees.

    PA was no big deal - the rocks slowed me down but it wasn't painful. Maybe because I wore thick boots?
    It's all good in the woods.

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