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  1. #1

    Default Water bottle, food, and electronics cold weather insulation bags. Lets DIY together.

    I'm looking tomake bags for all three of these and I'm searching for the insulation and outer material to use Perhaps Ill list everthing I find here until I can make a choice. Here are a few possibilities I found at Joann's, unfortunately they do not have weight on them. I'm hoping one of the materials below will be acceptable for weight/durability. I dont like throw away items. The only stipulation for material suggestions I have is to not use material that comes from animals.

    https://www.joann.com/bosal-poly-the.../16842924.html

    https://www.joann.com/insul-fleece-m.../10973568.html

    https://www.joann.com/solarize-liner...l?storeId=1929



    This bottle by Hyper Lite using - DCH50, DCH150, 1/4" Foam, Thinsulate

    https://www.hyperlitemountaingear.co...ctionhiker.com


    This food bag from Big Sky uses premium prima loft and "reflective fabric"

    https://bigskyinternational.com/prod...g-cooking-cozy

  2. #2

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    Hard to beat neoprene foam for insulation. Amazon sells sheets of it. Folks with access to industrial pipe insulation can get scraps for free as neoprene is used for pipe cold pipe insulation. Microbreweries us a lot of it.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by peakbagger View Post
    Hard to beat neoprene foam for insulation. Amazon sells sheets of it. Folks with access to industrial pipe insulation can get scraps for free as neoprene is used for pipe cold pipe insulation. Microbreweries us a lot of it.

    I'm wondering a few things about neoprene. 1. can it be sewn with your average home sewing machine if we want tight seams? 2.What size or weight is needed for below freezing tmperatures? Lets say down to zero farenheit.

  4. #4

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    I have DIY experience with the 3 JoAnn's materials. The reflective value for a shiny metallic fabric is not disputed for retention of heat. Columbia has used it successfully. But, you can have the same results by using a Dollar Store summer windshield reflector for about, ....well a $1.25. I have experimented with them all..... 'Insulbrite', disposable hospital thermal blankets, 'Refletix' water heater bubble wrap etc. Yes, neoprene is a good option, no question about that, (though not pliable ie. ok for pot insulation) however no thermal reflectivity. But, you can make your own items with out paying a lot of money, especially the cozy for meal re-hydrating. I have made all sorts of items like hammock under covers, and over quilts, which supplement down items of the same, and the weight/bulk advantage is worth it. Freeze dry meal pouch cozy the same. As far as your water bottle insulation, there's quite a lot of variables on that one, you might want to find some reviews about them.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by psyculman View Post
    I Yes, neoprene is a good option, no question about that, (though not pliable ie. ok for pot insulation) however no thermal reflectivity..
    I'll definitely want some reflectivity in this case.

  6. #6

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    The neoprene designs I have seen use glue to glue neoprene in cylinder to prevent compression of the neoprene. One end of the cylinder is sealed with round plug glued in. The other end if similar plug but not glued in. For abrasion protection, a nylon jacket is sewn so that the neoprene core slides in. with either a zip top or a drawstring top. Neoprene is kind of "sticky" so there is usually a nylon liner made to slip inside the cylinder. Hard to beat the Outdoor Research design. The foam is 1/2" thick and inside my pack it keeps near boiling water poured into it in the morning uncomfortably hot by noon.

  7. #7

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    For reference here is the 40 below bottle which seems to just use neoprene and hook and loop for a closure.

    https://40below.com/product/forty-be...-1-liter-size/


    Here is the Granite gear


    Here is the Oudoor Research insulator - https://www.outdoorresearch.com/prod...ter-usa-256497

    Does anyone have the materials for either of those? Read the tag if you have it. I would like to know the thickness of that neoprene.

    This insulator by granite gear seems to be discontinued, but uses foam and a cord lock at the top. - https://rocknroadcyclery.com/product...gear-aquatherm

  8. #8

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    I guess you cant really beat 40 belows design. Although I think the velcro noise may be annoying and I am concerned about how well the top is covered, their endorsements of the boot as they call it look pretty substantial.

    Now I have to find an accpetable piece of neoprene that has the thickness, color and siding that is similar 40 below's design. I'm not sure if I'll use it for the bags or not.

  9. #9
    Garlic
    Join Date
    10-15-2008
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    Golden CO
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    Please excuse the drift if this is unwanted. I've always just made a nest inside my pack with my sleeping insulation, covered by an extra fleece vest. Put a hot water bottle in there and you can have a warm lunch on the coldest days. I'll bag the water bottle as extra insurance against disastrous leaks, same as I do overnight in the sleeping bag. It's not convenient to sip during the day, but it's free, and keeps your insulation warm too.

  10. #10

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    I have a pouch/envelope I made out of a closed cell foam sleeping pad, like this one. The pouch is used for a 2-3 liter hydration bladder. I used the same material to construct an insulating layer for the hydration tube. Duct tape holds it all together. You could probably find pipe insulation that works for the hydration tube. Two things are needed. The first is not to let water sit in the hydration tube, blow air back inside after sipping. The second is to use a ratio of hot to cold water so that it starts out warm. I suppose one could alter the ratio if needed for very low temps but I typically use 1 part hot to 2 parts cold. I just bring the hot water to a boil.

    A tip for a one liter wide mouth is to pack it upside down in case it freezes. The ice will be on the bottom if it does.

    $95 for that OR cozy is absolutely ridiculous!! I do pack a little thermos anyway with hot tea in it.

    I also use the closed cell foam for a pot cozy to rehydrate food. You could even make a cozy for your wide mouth if you wanted out of the same material. Cut a rectangle, make a cylinder, then cut out circles for the top and bottom. Duct tape it all together, no sewing needed.
    "Sleepy alligator in the noonday sun
    Sleepin by the river just like he usually done
    Call for his whisky
    He can call for his tea
    Call all he wanta but he can't call me..."
    Robert Hunter & Ron McKernan

    Whiteblaze.net User Agreement.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alligator View Post
    I have a pouch/envelope I made out of a closed cell foam sleeping pad, like this one. The pouch is used for a 2-3 liter hydration bladder. I used the same material to construct an insulating layer for the hydration tube. Duct tape holds it all together. You could probably find pipe insulation that works for the hydration tube. Two things are needed. The first is not to let water sit in the hydration tube, blow air back inside after sipping. The second is to use a ratio of hot to cold water so that it starts out warm. I suppose one could alter the ratio if needed for very low temps but I typically use 1 part hot to 2 parts cold. I just bring the hot water to a boil.

    A tip for a one liter wide mouth is to pack it upside down in case it freezes. The ice will be on the bottom if it does.

    $95 for that OR cozy is absolutely ridiculous!! I do pack a little thermos anyway with hot tea in it.

    I also use the closed cell foam for a pot cozy to rehydrate food. You could even make a cozy for your wide mouth if you wanted out of the same material. Cut a rectangle, make a cylinder, then cut out circles for the top and bottom. Duct tape it all together, no sewing needed.
    At first I thought the bladder use was impossible for cold camping but I read the advice you stated here plus the fact that you can build a full insulation zip cover the tube like Platypus has for itheir bladders, which I do have one of.

    One problem I discovered for me and most people is that a home sewing machine will only do up to 4 mm neoprene, which basically means you are likely only to be able to do a 3mm neoprene that other type of rubber but I bet that will be good down to about zero, not sure on that one. Then the problem becomes you likely have to store it in the bag itself. So while I will make a cheap reflectix cover mysefl, first I want to try to get the bottle holder done. I guess I could just try to find an adequate material for both of them and try to save money that way.

    Make a cold temperature bladder cover for a reasonable price that is much more stream lined than a foam cover and duct tape, Even if you make it so the drink tube has to be tucked intto the case but can be worn on the back, I would consider that as a good improvement.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by garlic08 View Post
    Please excuse the drift if this is unwanted. I've always just made a nest inside my pack with my sleeping insulation, covered by an extra fleece vest. Put a hot water bottle in there and you can have a warm lunch on the coldest days. I'll bag the water bottle as extra insurance against disastrous leaks, same as I do overnight in the sleeping bag. It's not convenient to sip during the day, but it's free, and keeps your insulation warm too.
    That is a good reminder that you really dont have to have a cover/pouch as long as you have your sleeping back with you. On the other hand what about hiking without your sleeping bag? I take your point as very valid but it's nice to not drag along the bag.for day hikes.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alligator View Post
    I have a pouch/envelope I made out of a closed cell foam sleeping pad, like this one. The pouch is used for a 2-3 liter hydration bladder. I used the same material to construct an insulating layer for the hydration tube. Duct tape holds it all together. You could probably find pipe insulation that works for the hydration tube. Two things are needed. The first is not to let water sit in the hydration tube, blow air back inside after sipping. The second is to use a ratio of hot to cold water so that it starts out warm. I suppose one could alter the ratio if needed for very low temps but I typically use 1 part hot to 2 parts cold. I just bring the hot water to a boil.

    A tip for a one liter wide mouth is to pack it upside down in case it freezes. The ice will be on the bottom if it does.

    $95 for that OR cozy is absolutely ridiculous!! I do pack a little thermos anyway with hot tea in it.

    I also use the closed cell foam for a pot cozy to rehydrate food. You could even make a cozy for your wide mouth if you wanted out of the same material. Cut a rectangle, make a cylinder, then cut out circles for the top and bottom. Duct tape it all together, no sewing needed.
    At first I thought the bladder use was impossible for cold camping but I read the advice you stated here plus the fact that you can build a full insulation zip cover the tube like Platypus has for itheir bladders, which I do have one of.

    One problem I discovered for me and most people is that a home sewing machine will only do up to 4 mm neoprene, which basically means you are likely only to be able to do a 3mm neoprene that other type of rubber but I bet that will be good down to about zero, not sure on that one. Then the problem becomes you likely have to store it in the bag itself. So while I will make a cheap reflectix cover mysefl, first I want to try to get the bottle holder done. I guess I could just try to find an adequate material for both of them and try to save money that way.

    Make a cold temperature bladder cover for a reasonable price that is much more stream lined than a foam cover and duct tape, Even if you make it so the drink tube has to be tucked intto the case but can be worn on the back, I would consider that as a good improvement.

  14. #14
    Garlic
    Join Date
    10-15-2008
    Location
    Golden CO
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    Quote Originally Posted by VeganHiker View Post
    That is a good reminder that you really dont have to have a cover/pouch as long as you have your sleeping back with you. On the other hand what about hiking without your sleeping bag? I take your point as very valid but it's nice to not drag along the bag.for day hikes.
    On winter day trips I always have at least two extra insulation layers. I'm a dietary vegan, not completely so in lifestyle, so I have a down vest (it was a gift from the trail crew). It works great as a "pack Thermos" with my extra fleece on top. And I'll tell you, that warm lunch is fantastic. I've extended day trips with spouse and friends just by giving them my hot water bottle to snuggle with for a while, or my spare warmed mittens or hat. My winter day pack is large enough for all that.
    "Throw a loaf of bread and a pound of tea in an old sack and jump over the back fence." John Muir on expedition planning

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by VeganHiker View Post
    At first I thought the bladder use was impossible for cold camping but I read the advice you stated here plus the fact that you can build a full insulation zip cover the tube like Platypus has for itheir bladders, which I do have one of.

    One problem I discovered for me and most people is that a home sewing machine will only do up to 4 mm neoprene, which basically means you are likely only to be able to do a 3mm neoprene that other type of rubber but I bet that will be good down to about zero, not sure on that one. Then the problem becomes you likely have to store it in the bag itself. So while I will make a cheap reflectix cover mysefl, first I want to try to get the bottle holder done. I guess I could just try to find an adequate material for both of them and try to save money that way.

    Make a cold temperature bladder cover for a reasonable price that is much more stream lined than a foam cover and duct tape, Even if you make it so the drink tube has to be tucked intto the case but can be worn on the back, I would consider that as a good improvement.
    I've used it many times and it is absolutely doable. Weak point is the potential to have the tube freeze, even insulated. So blow air back. If you freeze the tube, you can CAREFULLY warm it inside your jacket. Don't wet your jacket doing it!

    You could hand sew the neoprene if needed. It's not a big job. My sewing isn't ever pretty but it just has to be functional!
    "Sleepy alligator in the noonday sun
    Sleepin by the river just like he usually done
    Call for his whisky
    He can call for his tea
    Call all he wanta but he can't call me..."
    Robert Hunter & Ron McKernan

    Whiteblaze.net User Agreement.

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by garlic08 View Post
    On winter day trips I always have at least two extra insulation layers. I'm a dietary vegan, not completely so in lifestyle, so I have a down vest (it was a gift from the trail crew). It works great as a "pack Thermos" with my extra fleece on top. And I'll tell you, that warm lunch is fantastic. I've extended day trips with spouse and friends just by giving them my hot water bottle to snuggle with for a while, or my spare warmed mittens or hat. My winter day pack is large enough for all that.
    If one is careful as you mentioned to keep the water bottle ziplocked this works too. I personally keep a jacket or vest handy at the top of my pack for breaks. A drawback might be a person's appropriate hydration needs. I typically drink close to 3 liters while hiking throughout the day in the winter. This would require 3 one liter bottles prepped in the morning. (Expecting to be able to stop to prep a liter is not a good idea.) Three bottles buried inside the pack is a little bulky IMO vs a bladder in a bladder pocket. I know the amount needed varies by person, but people should be careful in the winter to stay hydrated as it is important and you might not feel thirsty as strongly as in the warmer months. Don't ever short yourself a bottle or a liter because it can be downright difficult to get water prepped for consumption if the conditions are poor and you are dehydrated.
    "Sleepy alligator in the noonday sun
    Sleepin by the river just like he usually done
    Call for his whisky
    He can call for his tea
    Call all he wanta but he can't call me..."
    Robert Hunter & Ron McKernan

    Whiteblaze.net User Agreement.

  17. #17

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    Someone beat this price for neoprene with same thickness and adequate fabric backing. Preferably turtle island based. - https://www.agama-diving.com/neopren...5-mm-thickness

    I"m learning a lot about insulation. Learned a good amount about batting and now working on foam.

  18. #18
    Registered User
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    Massachusetts
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    Thoughts.

    Everything depends how cold and windy it will be... and where it is going to be kept. In camp, a standard nalgene bottle with some insulation will fit on the inside pocket of my parka and probably a partially filled 2 liter platypus. Your 5mm insulated bottle might be carried there or in the pack. Whatever you wear consider sewing a simple pocket inside your outerwear avoiding your pack straps.

    If you are going to stitch thicker neoprene or other material, consider using a leather stitching tool and stitch it by hand. After securing the ends of the stitches you might also glue them. I watched an episode of "This Old House" where a fork like punch was used on thick leather to make clean even holes that could then be easily hand stitched. I would expect it to work on neoprene. These are available in various hole thickness and/or prong numbers. Overlap one hole to produce a high quality line of holes.

    If I were making a covering for a Nalgene type bottle, I would initially try thick foam (1 - 2cm) or something similar that might still be sold cheaply at Target/Walmart as either a sleeping pad or yoga/exercise mat if I could find the right glue. For the 2cm thickness, I would more likely strap it to the side of the pack rather than put it inside. Conceptually, I would build a cylinder like described earlier but glue both ends and make a cut about 2 -3 inches from one end to create a "cap" that can be pulled off giving you access to the top of the water bottle. When gluing I might need to make the lengthwise cut at a slight angle since the inside diameter is smaller. I would make a trial run in the freezer to see how well it fits and slides off. One could also sew two tight fitting sleeves for the outside to protect it and eliminate worries about the glue failing. I would use duct tape.

    For the most part keeping a water bottle upside down in the pack inside insulated clothing works well (a winter sock, or synthetic bootie for extend hikes helps). I do own a cylindrical type insulated bottle cover that has frozen somewhat when worn on a belt. However, I always have extra clothing for any wind, drops in temp, stops or emergencies essentially enough clothing to stay warm for quite some time so the bottle doesn't go in my sleeping bag but usually in a parka, vest, or warm jacket.

    The blow back method has worked okay for me for my limited winter platypus use but I don't use the tubed platypus as my only water source. I found that the cap area would freeze eventually at "lower" temps. presumably from sloshing but it also was not insulated in any way.

  19. #19

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    We have another better looking material to use instead of Neoprene its Lexcell - https://rockywoods.com/products/3-0m...bfed4c25&_ss=r

    Lexcell CC closed cell foam rubber by Yulex is the world's first natural, plant-based replacement for polychloroprene (aka neoprene) foam. Originally created in partnership with Patagonia for their neoprene-free wetsuit.
    Lexcell CC and its range of applications have grown steadily ever since the commercial launch with Patagonia, winning multiple surf industry and environmental awards, trade and international recognition.
    Lexcell CC is now the first choice by global brands looking for higher performing, environmentally friendly and plant-based replacements for synthetics.
    *Recycled black nylon fabric is laminated to both sides*
    Advantages
    • Plant-based, high performing elastomeric foam with a closed cell structure
      Available with one or two side lamination or combination of texture and lamination
    • Easily cuts, lasers, die stamps, glues and sews just like neoprene foams, but better
    • Unparalleled flexibility, durability, and application performance
    • Lexcell polymers are biodegradable
      Cushioning, impact, and vibration absorption Exceptional elongation, low density and water resistance (closed cell)

    • Wide range of firmness: from extremely soft to highly firm

      Thermal control, warmth retention through air flow

  20. #20

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    Ok, I'm going to order some of the Lexcell even though it is only 3mm. Does anyone want half? It's expensive. Cash App, paypal or plain old cash. Send me a message if interested. i'll try to get hte dimensions as it is they say a full sheet is - 47" x 82" 5% in size. I'm not sure which way they are cutting that. I'll probably order some insulation, ecopak,zippers hook and loop and maybe some mylar for bags.

    Any thoughts on design given the constraints of the materials? Any better ideas on how to insulate it?

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