WhiteBlaze Pages 2024
A Complete Appalachian Trail Guidebook.
AVAILABLE NOW. $4 for interactive PDF(smartphone version)
Read more here WhiteBlaze Pages Store

Results 1 to 19 of 19
  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    07-05-2016
    Location
    Rhode Island
    Age
    31
    Posts
    22

    Default Digital shakedown

    Hi everyone, I'm getting ready for my nobo attempt on April 1 at springer, I'm going over my gear list and would like to ask for opinions and suggestions to lighten my load, and maybe answer a question or two. Below are my gear lists for what I'm wearing/carrying

    Gear List

    https://lighterpack.com/r/rluzs5

    Worn clothing

    https://lighterpack.com/r/196oq1

    My concern is should I add a pair of synthetic base pants and a wool/synthetic longsleeve for use during the day as opposed to my wool baselayers for sleep during the night. Aside from getting my med kit figured out (Vit I, tylenol, anti-crap meds) I feel like I've got a solid load that I consider to be light-weight, but I'm open to recommendations and advice. I hope I'm posting this in the right forum, sorry if it ain't.

  2. #2

    Default

    I didn’t see a smart phone on the list, but not everyone carries one.

  3. #3

    Default

    I think the phone question is legitimate. You could use Guthook and then delete the 8 oz AT guide while still having a computer in your pocket.

    If you have one of those nights where it’s cold, if you put everything on and got into bed, I think you would survive.

  4. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    07-05-2016
    Location
    Rhode Island
    Age
    31
    Posts
    22

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gpburdelljr View Post
    I didnít see a smart phone on the list, but not everyone carries one.
    To be fair the smart phone is a given, I didn't think to include it in my gear because its kind of like my pants, if I leave my house without it I'm in trouble lol. However it is a good point,

  5. #5
    Registered User
    Join Date
    10-04-2016
    Location
    West Chester, PA
    Age
    56
    Posts
    21

    Default

    That’s a pretty good list. Fwiw, if you’re bringing a phone, you probably don’t need the paper at guide - if you pack doesn’t absorb water, the pack cover is sort of a pain and your using trash compactor bags any way. Here’s some additional things I bring: knee brace (usually don’t need), bandana (as well as buff), small tenacious tape, safety pin for blisters, foot powder, backpacking bidet (worth it), small nalgene and insulation (coffee in the morning, extra water carrier, nice for massaging feet), battery for charging phone and headlight, cable and wall outlet for charging things, enlighten equipment jacket instead of fleece, bug net (permethrin treat everything). While I like my trail runners, I also like my crocs for camp wear, rain kilt is awesome, Fanny pack for snacks during day. I use body glide, recommend it, particularly for warm weather hiking.

  6. #6
    Registered User
    Join Date
    10-04-2016
    Location
    West Chester, PA
    Age
    56
    Posts
    21

    Default

    Also if you can afford it, as it gets warmer you could switch to a 40 degree quilt and get a pair of zip off pants over the other items you have. For some parts of the trail an extra water bladder is nice and gives you some options to camp further from water.

  7. #7
    Registered User
    Join Date
    10-04-2016
    Location
    West Chester, PA
    Age
    56
    Posts
    21

    Default

    Just to add, I’m a section hiker so I always get to plan for weather in a way that a through hiker can’t. I use a hammock because it is almost always easier to find two trees over flat ground and it is much nicer for me to change out of wet clothes standing up and I get to bring my sofa and lounger with me. My hiking routine and gear means I get to stop more often where I want instead of looking for a campsite. My base weight is normally 12 to 14 pounds as I don’t bring a lot of extra clothes and my daily food is less than 24 oz. Keep an eye on guthooks/FarOut and you can better plan for water carry’s and places to resuplly for food. If you can afford it, stay at hostels occasionally to clean your gear, recharge, and experience them.

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    12-01-2017
    Location
    Mobile, Alabama
    Age
    74
    Posts
    234
    Images
    1

    Default Title

    I would ditch the tevoas Sandles. Lighter maybe more comfortable options that you wonít wear much.

    .Test your Walmart underwear and clothes ..IMO cheap polyester clothes are horrid for wicking moisture, at least take a closer look at what materials are used and how tight the weave is.

    .i donít like the way paracord bunches up in most applications, itís the worst for bear hangs. Unless you think your gonna need to get the extra strands from inside or parachute there are many better as light or lighter options.
    .

    Donít see electronicsÖ battery bank? Phone? etc. rhetorical question.
    Last edited by petedelisio; 03-04-2024 at 01:13. Reason: Didnít follow opís instructions

  9. #9
    Registered User
    Join Date
    12-01-2017
    Location
    Mobile, Alabama
    Age
    74
    Posts
    234
    Images
    1

    Default

    If you go with the Walmart synthetic clothes.
    Take note of which ones, material construction, how well they perform, and durability and post back please. Thanks.

  10. #10

    Default

    I would say NO to an extra, 'hiking' set of base layers.
    My clothing set very similar to yours. On the rare day (mid-Mar to early Apr) when I awoke to below-freezing temps with a cold wind, I just left my sleeping base layers on, hiking pants + fleece over top, then rain gear on top of that (plus hat, buff, hoods). Within an hour or two, warmed up, and removed that base layer. Starting in April, I think the days you may be inclined to do that will be rare to none. Rain gear works great for warmth/wind protection, and may be just enough additional warmth to get you going in the morning (and easier to shed then the base layer!).

  11. #11

    Default

    I’m also a no on the extra base layers. If it’s that cold you can pull on your rain gear. Hopefully the jacket has pit zips. I never hiked in my sleep gear, and am glad I didn’t. Good call on the rain pants. I’m glad I had some.

    You can probably pick between the puffy and the fleece. Doubt you need both.

    Can understand overlooking the phone, but you need at least a charging cord and adapter. And if you bring headphones, satellite comm, etc cords for those. And a waterproof bag.

    Soap and/or hand sanitizer. I was SOBO and got away with hand sanitizer, but NOBO in April would probably use soap.

    Either TP or backcountry bidet. No wipes please.

    Personal preference but you could ditch your bear hang kit and use an Ursack for a modest weight add, and much less chore time in camp. Especially when you get to camp at twilight.

  12. #12
    This side of the dirt
    Join Date
    05-29-2008
    Location
    Wherever I happen to be
    Posts
    430
    Images
    8

    Default

    Not trying to sound like a smart a$$ - one thing that wasn't mentioned to "lighten your load" was body weight. I know people that drilled holes in the handle of their toothbrush to save weight, yet they were carrying 10 lbs of fat on their waistline.
    "Always bear in mind that your own resolution to succeed, is more important than any other one thing." Abraham Lincoln (1855)


  13. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Montana Mac View Post
    Not trying to sound like a smart a$$ - one thing that wasn't mentioned to "lighten your load" was body weight. I know people that drilled holes in the handle of their toothbrush to save weight, yet they were carrying 10 lbs of fat on their waistline.
    That’s a self correcting problem doing a thru hike. Most people lose weight.

  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Montana Mac View Post
    Not trying to sound like a smart a$$ - one thing that wasn't mentioned to "lighten your load" was body weight. I know people that drilled holes in the handle of their toothbrush to save weight, yet they were carrying 10 lbs of fat on their waistline.
    I put on pounds every Winter in preparation for the next long hike. Dropped 35 pounds over two months last year hiking New England mountains. Weekenders might benefit from your "advice", but it would kill me
    ďThe man who goes alone can start today; but he who travels with another must wait until that other is ready...Ē~Henry David Thoreau

    http://lesstraveledby.net
    YouTube Channel
    Trailspace Reviews

  15. #15
    Some days, it's not worth chewing through the restraints.
    Join Date
    12-13-2004
    Location
    Central Vermont
    Age
    69
    Posts
    2,674

    Default

    Looks good to me, but since you asked...
    I've never used camp shoes, so they're not on my list - that'll save you a pound.
    I do carry a fleece and puffy, some don't.
    Trade the z-seat for a 1/8" thinlight pad. Does everything the z-seat does and much more, for about the same weight.
    Trade the REI rainwear for Frog Togs and an umbrella.
    Some gauze and tape or at least a good bunch of bandages.

    Here's the list I used to get my base under 15 pounds: https://www.backpacking.net/27-pound.html#pack

  16. #16

    Default

    In the warmest weather on the AT I have something similar to what you have as your base pants and 1/4" zip Merino shirt plus a puffy vest. Shirt and pants are lightweight fleece. I would have a puffy jacket though in April. This is for camp. About 2/3 of the year on the AT I wear shorts. About 1/4 of the time a sleeveless shirt, 1/4 of the time short sleeve, then about 1/2 the time a long sleeve. Moving up from my warmest weather gear then I usually add in silk top and bottoms, and then start to change out jackets or add in another layer as I go from summer to winter. Same thing for hat and gloves. I have a lightweight pair of gloves and a hat. Those get warmer as the seasons get colder.

    If you like a button down hiking shirt your choice. You can usually save a couple ounces to several for something without buttons as a hiking shirt.

    Are you a big dude? That's a gigantic sleeping pad. I'm 6'2" but not a linebacker. That pad is 3" so that's like sleeping on cliff but I make do with a 72x20 older neoair. It has a dropoff and I can see if that might irritate some as it does take getting used to but you maybe could work with 20" wide pad. Quilts can drop off a bit to note as well. Yours isn't terrible weight wise and if it makes you happy that's what matters!

    Taking your brain out huh? They are so helfpful for organization. They make packs with and without them. However you are used to having them is best. I prefer to have them for organization: hat, gloves, headlamp, map, knife, snacks, bearline, lighter, certain medicines, windshirt, phone, charger maybe. Top of the main body of the pack I put my puffy and food bag. I don't want little things falling down into the pack or falling out when I grab my puffy at break or my food bag. Or in camp taking out cook gear, clothes, shelter, bag, etc. I don't carry anything in my shorts or pants pockets. I do also like hip belt pockets on my packs. All my hiking packs have a brain and a hip pouch or two. The more systematic you are with taking things in and out of your pack, the less likely you are to lose something. (Until you put it in the wrong place!)
    "Sleepy alligator in the noonday sun
    Sleepin by the river just like he usually done
    Call for his whisky
    He can call for his tea
    Call all he wanta but he can't call me..."
    Robert Hunter & Ron McKernan

    Whiteblaze.net User Agreement.

  17. #17
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-24-2018
    Location
    Wytheville, Virginia
    Age
    36
    Posts
    24

    Default

    Big umbrella proponent (several outdoor companies make a reflective one so it works for sun and rain and they're light) and z-packs has a thing that easily attaches them to your shoulder strap so you can still use your poles. I would not have believed how well this system works before trying it.

  18. #18

    Default

    No shoes in the worn weight? Doing the Barefoot Sisters thing?

    I'd also skip the camp shoes if you are wearing wide toe box shoes. I did carry camp shoes, and they were nice to have, esp since I was using narrower La Sportivas. Good shoes, but they cramped my toes. Now wearing Topos, and can see how you could skip camp shoes.

  19. #19
    Super Moderator Ender's Avatar
    Join Date
    12-12-2003
    Location
    Lovely coastal Maine
    Age
    49
    Posts
    2,281

    Default

    Good looking list! Your packed clothes weight will go down a lot come summertime. And my guess is you'll ditch the rain pants come warmer weather as well. I only really used rain pants when it was still really cold.

    You might want to investigate a poncho come summertime... much more comfortable, and you can drape it over your backpack as well so you can ditch the pack cover.
    Don't take anything I say seriously... I certainly don't.

++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •