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Thread: Training

  1. #1

    :banana Training

    These past few weekends, we have be training hard for for some weekend hiking. How much is too much or to little? Today I did a number of miles and I felt ok but tired. Should I increase the miles and push my limit until I am about to to drop? I plan to hike the Cumberland Valley for about 10 miles. How do you know when you are ready?

  2. #2

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    Depending on the condition you were in as you started weekend training, this is a fairly practical idea to improve your overall condition. Its hard to tell when you are ready, only you can do that, but if you are walking and get five miles done and still have more gas in the tank, I would think that would be a good body signal. A 10-mile hike doesn't sound like a lot, but if you are out of shape or carrying too heavy a load, it can be insufferable.

    I would carry a pack at about half the weight you expect to haul on an overnight camping hike for the next few walks. You also may want to increase the number of training days during the week (not necessarily mileage) so your body is better acclimated for 2-days in a row walking with a load. Likely you will do fine given the goal, however once you do a camping hike, stay with the program so you don't lose the conditioning you worked hard to build!

    Have fun - the most important part!

  3. #3
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    It's important to find a balance in your training, you should challenge yourself but also listen to your body to avoid overtraining. Gradually increase your mileage to build endurance, but don't push yourself to the point of exhaustion. If you can complete your planned mileage, like the 10 miles in Cumberland Valley, and still feel relatively good the next day, you're likely ready. Remember, rest and recovery are just as important as the training itself.

  4. #4

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    Movement is the key. Keep moving!

  5. #5
    Garlic
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    One thing to consider is risk--what will happen if you fail? Walking laps on a high school track in town is less risky than 10 miles into the wilderness!

    A rule of thumb I've heard from distance runners, and seems to hold true for me (a non-runner), is to train to one third of your target event. That'll get you in shape while minimizing risk of injury.
    "Throw a loaf of bread and a pound of tea in an old sack and jump over the back fence." John Muir on expedition planning

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by garlic08 View Post
    A rule of thumb I've heard from distance runners, and seems to hold true for me (a non-runner), is to train to one third of your target event. That'll get you in shape while minimizing risk of injury.
    Also from distance running, I've heard to back off on training intensity (but not frequency) 10-14 days before the event. I'm starting the AT in the White Mountains in three weeks and plan to do my last mountain hiking about 10 days out.

  7. #7
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    I wear my large daypack and carry my normal dayhiking gear for fast walks and then start adding 2 liter water bottles one at time about every 4 or 5 days. Its easy to plateau with walking, you need to find some sjort up hills that enough to get you breathing hard, then a level section to get your breathing back in check. Once you get to the point where you are not slowing down as much for the hill, then add another water bfilled bottle.

  8. #8
    Registered User LittleRock's Avatar
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    Most important thing is to make sure you get regular exercise including cardio. 30 minutes 2 days/week minimum. Highest intensity your body will tolerate. Doesn't have to be hiking, even the treadmill or elliptical will help.

    Doing wall sits really helps with knee strength. Makes a huge difference on those steep downhills. Start with 1 minute and build your way up to 5 minutes if you can.

    I usually do 2 training hikes with full pack (~30 lbs) before an AT section hike. First hike is 2 weeks before departure, 6 miles with no breaks, usually completed in about 2 hours. Second is one week before departure, 10 miles with a couple breaks, usually completed in about 4 hours. Terrain is hilly but nowhere near the AT.

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