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  1. #1
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    Default What is the best camera from a thru-hike

    I have little or no experience with cameras and will be buying one for my up and coming through hike. Can anyone suggest a camera that worked for them. I assume it needs to be durable and resistant to changing weather and terrain.
    Also as a side note.
    I was looking for suggestions on socks, what kind, and how many I would need.

    Thanks MC

  2. #2
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    [quote=Moon Cricket]I was looking for suggestions on socks, what kind, and how many I would need.
    ===============================
    For socks I'd suggest you consider Thorlo Light Hikers with CoolMax. Quantity-wise I'd suggest you wear one pair and carry 2 pair. Keep an extra 3 - 4 pair in a bounce box or have them mailed to you at different intervals to swap out the ones that are getting burned out.

    You can get a pretty decent deal on the socks and often free shipping at the following website:

    http://www.thesockcompany.com

    Good Socks help make Happy Feet ...

    'Slogger
    The more I learn ...the more I realize I don't know.

  3. #3
    Thru-hike 2008! BDT's Avatar
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    I use a fuji E510 and love it. I only weighs 5 oz. and takes amazing photos.
    Shut up, and pry open your Third Eye

  4. #4
    Registered User weary's Avatar
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    I would start by buying the July issue of Consumer Reports, which rates 100 digital cameras. CU is not infallible, but rarely do they recommend a real lemon in my experience.

    People without much camera experience should choose simple to operate cameras. I also strongly recommend double A batteries, thus avoiding the hassle of recharging on the trail.

    Choose from the Consumer Reports "small and simple camera list. The magazine lists the Sony Cyber Shot DSC W-5 as a best buy at $220. You can shave a few ounces and add a $100 by buying a subcompact. But I wouldn't.

    Weary

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    Registered User Michele's Avatar
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    I had asked a similar question before, about cameras, and a lot of people recommended the Nikon Coolpix 2 (I think 3 is out, but 2 is still available). It runs on AA batteries and has all the basic features a beginner can understand. It is $300.00 though!

  6. #6
    GA/VA 2007 Buckles's Avatar
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    Default Check Out the Nikon Coolpix L2

    Small, lightweight (approx. 4.2 oz., without the batteries), runs on AA's (use the lithiums!), lots of features. I like it, and I'm a hardcore SLR/Slide Film user.
    "Don't worry...even if things end up a bit too heavy...we'll all float on... all right."
    - Modest Mouse



  7. #7
    LT '79; AT '73-'14 in sections; Donating Member Kerosene's Avatar
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    You also need to take a look at the Pentax Optio WP: 6 megapixels, 3X optical zoom, 2" LCD, proprietary battery, 4.6 oz, waterproof.
    GA←↕→ME: 1973 to 2014

  8. #8
    Registered User Grampie's Avatar
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    Default Thru hike camera

    If you are not a serious photo type and don't want to spend a lot of money do what I did.
    Buy disposable cameras. Take pictures and send the camera home and buy another. I did this on my thru. I used 10 or 11 cameras, brought them along the way, I got some great photos. Never have to worry about an expensive camera or having fresh batteries.
    I have an album with arounf 200 pictures, from my hike. Folks do not believe the quality.
    The fewer problems you bring to the trail, the more enjoyment you will have.
    Grampie-N->2001
    Grampie-N->2001

  9. #9
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    I agree with Kerosene in that you should have a boo at the Pentax Optio. In my opinion, this is a first class backpacker's camera. The only snag is the proprietary battery - I always carry a spare. I can attest to the camera's waterproof characteristics. On a recent hike I was up to my chest in cold sea water and the camera was in my shorts pocket. Rinsed it off in fresh water and no worries. Well, that's not quite true - I worried a LOT - I should have said, no problems.

    Cheers,

    PKH
    Youth is wasted on the young.

  10. #10
    Registered User Big Dawg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grampie
    If you are not a serious photo type and don't want to spend a lot of money do what I did.
    Buy disposable cameras. Take pictures and send the camera home and buy another. I did this on my thru. I used 10 or 11 cameras, brought them along the way, I got some great photos. Never have to worry about an expensive camera or having fresh batteries.
    I have an album with arounf 200 pictures, from my hike. Folks do not believe the quality.
    The fewer problems you bring to the trail, the more enjoyment you will have.
    Grampie-N->2001
    ....until a photolab f's up your film & those awesome pics from a great hike are gone forever. I now want the versatility of managing my own pics online w/ a digital camera. I'm eyeing the Olympus Stylus,, weatherproof & shock resistant. Damn, that gear list seems to keep growing.

    Although Grampie, I will say that my past "disposable camera" pics came out great too,,,,, when they were processed correctly!

    I guess I'll have to re-hike that section that's missing pics,,,, hmmmmmm,, another reason to go hiking. I like it!!!

  11. #11
    Registered User Big Dawg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PKH
    Pentax Optio. In my opinion, this is a first class backpacker's camera.

    Cheers,

    PKH
    Thanks PKH, I was just checking it out at Pentax.com. Seems like a great camera. What does it weigh, including battery? What's the battery life like?

    Thanks, Dawg

  12. #12
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    Well, I figured that I would toss out info on another camera to consider.

    Prior to this month, I had been using an Olympus Stylus 300 . . . neat little camera . . . small, lightweight, weatherproof. My only gripe was that it took lousy low-light photos.

    Well, about a month ago the camera died. I think that a static charge fried the chip when swapping batteries, but I am speculating a bit there.

    Anyway, I was happy with the Olympus Stylus and wanted to stay with that line. I selected and have purchased the Stylus 720sw and have had it for 3 weeks (no trail use yet, but it did go kayaking in Hot Springs). It is designed a bit differently, but it is still very small. The published weight is 5.3 ounces without the very small battery. I have yet to weigh mine to get a real weight. They greatly improved the low light capabilities on this camera. This one is waterproof to 10 feet (camera drops in stream or gets soaked when fording or in heavy rain) and is shock proof for drops from 5 ft (or so they claim). One feature that they added on this one that I think that I will really like for hiking is the ability to put audio tags of up to 4 seconds with each picture. This feature will help with the, "Okay, so where was that" or "Why did I take that picture" moments.

    From the reviews that I read, most folks seem to give the 720sw just average scores on image quality put great reviews for its ruggedness. For me, that rugged design is important.

    Since the camera uses a rechargeable proprietary battery instead of something more standard -- like triple A's -- anyone considering it for a thru would need to plan for charging and/or extra batteries. As a section hiker, this was not an issue for me though.

  13. #13
    Never Stop Dreaming Rainman's Avatar
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    Default Nikon Coolpix 5600

    I use the Coolpix 5600. it is an older version than the L series and you might find it for a little less $. It is a bit heavier than the L2 (6.3 oz v. 6.0 oz.). It takes great pictures and is definitely great if you don't want to think about composing the shot. Check out my gallery. Most, if not all, of my pictures were taken with this camera.

    To be honest, if I was shopping now, the L2's sleeker size may appeal to me. I would have to hold it to be sure. The 5600 is easy to hold onto because it has a wider "grip' end. There's my $.02.

    Rainman

    Now I see the secret of the making of the best persons,
    It is to grow in the open air and to eat and sleep with the earth.

    - Walt Whitman: Leaves of Grass; Song of the Open Road.

  14. #14
    Registered User hammock engineer's Avatar
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    I'm also at the point know where I am ready to buy the digital camera for my hike this summer. I was looking at one of the cheaper nikon's. Something in the $150-200 range.

    But I like the waterproof cameras in the earlier posts. One thing I do not like is that battery. Does anyone know of a waterproof camera that takes AA batteries?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by hammock engineer
    I'm also at the point know where I am ready to buy the digital camera for my hike this summer. I was looking at one of the cheaper nikon's. Something in the $150-200 range.

    But I like the waterproof cameras in the earlier posts. One thing I do not like is that battery. Does anyone know of a waterproof camera that takes AA batteries?
    Regarding the battery for the Olympus, I should point out in fairness that battery life is quite good. As long as you don't spend lots of time viewing pics on the screen, you could probably get away with one extra battery and putting the charger in a bounce box. That said, a similar camera that used triple A's would be super.

    The list on the Olympus is $400. You can find it for about $50 less than that if you shop around.

    Oh, in reading owner reviews before purchasing, the funniest thing I read was on Amazon.com, "I've never seen a point and shoot built like this. You could put this thing on the end of a chain and use it as a weapon and then take pictures of your vanquished foe afterward. Its tough. It has an all metal frame that surround it, the front plate is plastic, the back glass, metal and plastic. It feels very solid."

  16. #16

    Default use your phone if you like.

    i did. i dont carry a camera per say. i use my phone. i dont take more than a picture a week. and it makes little vidios. and a software named data pilot downloads them to your computer from anywhere theres a signal.the pictures arent good but i dont care. i record with my mind instead. i love hiking to much to pause for anything when im walkin.
    matthewski

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by trippclark
    Well, I figured that I would toss out info on another camera to consider.

    Prior to this month, I had been using an Olympus Stylus 300 . . . neat little camera . . . small, lightweight, weatherproof. My only gripe was that it took lousy low-light photos.

    Well, about a month ago the camera died. I think that a static charge fried the chip when swapping batteries, but I am speculating a bit there.

    Anyway, I was happy with the Olympus Stylus and wanted to stay with that line. I selected and have purchased the Stylus 720sw and have had it for 3 weeks (no trail use yet, but it did go kayaking in Hot Springs). It is designed a bit differently, but it is still very small. The published weight is 5.3 ounces without the very small battery. I have yet to weigh mine to get a real weight. They greatly improved the low light capabilities on this camera. This one is waterproof to 10 feet (camera drops in stream or gets soaked when fording or in heavy rain) and is shock proof for drops from 5 ft (or so they claim). One feature that they added on this one that I think that I will really like for hiking is the ability to put audio tags of up to 4 seconds with each picture. This feature will help with the, "Okay, so where was that" or "Why did I take that picture" moments.

    From the reviews that I read, most folks seem to give the 720sw just average scores on image quality put great reviews for its ruggedness. For me, that rugged design is important.

    Since the camera uses a rechargeable proprietary battery instead of something more standard -- like triple A's -- anyone considering it for a thru would need to plan for charging and/or extra batteries. As a section hiker, this was not an issue for me though.

    I checked the weight on digital scales. The camera with battery is 5.8 oz. An extra battery pack weights 0.5 oz. The batteries list for about $30, but I was able to find online for $15.95 and bought two. With three total batteries the whole package is 6.8 oz and would last a very long time between charges. For a thru, a charger in a bounce box should do the trick.

  18. #18
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    i'm taking my olympus d-380 with me. it's not the lightest and i'm no photographer, but i manage to take good pictures with it on a regular basis. so i trust it.

    it has a nice viewing screen and lets you zoom and you can even take panoramics and 2-in-1 pictures. 2.0 megapixel & 5X digital zoom. atuomatic flash detection (but you can manually set what setting you want).

  19. #19
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    Battery life is key. Look for cameras that use 4 AA batteries. Features: abiliity to change ASA. Ability to manually set aperture and shutter speed.
    eg. Canon Power Shots
    http://www.letsgodigital.org/en/digi...ra/review.html

    http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/

    http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/read...key=canon_a620

    Socks: Important, but often overlooked. Thickness can alter fit of your shoe. Ridges in socks can create lumps after a lot of miles. Thinner socks dry faster. Ankle high socks (like tennis or bike) are nice in hot weather.
    Liner socks can help prevent hot spots. When you rest for a while, remove your footwear and socks to give yuour feet a breather. Remove insoles at night, to help dry out your footwear.
    Last edited by Rambler; 06-24-2006 at 08:03.

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