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  1. #1
    FEEL the endorphins! MrHappy's Avatar
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    Default Jetboil OK for thru-hike?

    So I have a jet-boil and I love the thing, because I do a lot of weekend-winter-camping in very cold temperatures, and the jet boil melts snow better than any MSR stoves i've tried (quite a few). Anyways, It is rather bulky, as are the fuel canisters, though not terribly heavy. Do you guys think it's suitable for a thru-hike? I'm planning on starting in January, and only cooking for the first few months when the warm food will be good for me, and then switching to all cold foods for the final months.

  2. #2
    Registered User Frolicking Dinosaurs's Avatar
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    Default

    If you decide to use the Jet-Boil, you might want to take a look at Sarbar's freezer bag cooking site.

  3. #3
    the hiker formaly known as Wonderfoot
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    I started with a Jet-Boil this year, and I love the way it works...........but it was way too hevey for me. Switched to a basic alachol stove and I love it! Light weight, and easy to use....but pratice with it first, or you'll blow through your fuel in 2 days(Opps)
    Oh, and as a side note........I love the freezer bag cooking. My mom sent me recipes from there and they were way tasty! Only draw back.......people staring you down as they eat their thousandth ramen or lipton!

    The long brown path before me leading wherever I choose............................................ ...
    Strong and content I travel the open road
    ~Walt Whitman Song of the open road

  4. #4
    GA=>ME 2007 the_iceman's Avatar
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    Default Take the Jetboil

    If you are starting early you probably want to stick with the Jetboil over the alcohol stoves. Alcohol stoves do not do so well in the cold. I am planning a Feb. 07 start and I am taking my Jetboil over alcohol or my MSR Whiper-lite for weight, convenience, and the clean burn.

    Considering the Jetboil is a cup, pot, dish, and is all self contained it in not very bulky. It is not as light as an alcohol stove that is for sure but to me well worth the few extra ounces. Sometimes you have to consider “quality-of-life” on the trail when you look at options.
    The heaviest thing I carried was my attitude.
    Montani semper liberi - Mountaineers are always free

    Desire is the main ingredient for success

  5. #5

    Default

    Carried a jetboil the entire time during my sobo thru hike. This thing was a workhorse that never misfired once. The jetboil can take a beating. Plus it was nice to have dinner ready in a matter of minutes.

  6. #6
    Hiker Trash! WhoAh's Avatar
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    10-24-2002
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    Default

    I looked at the jetboil but am also considering the Wind Pro for the first part of my hike and switching to my Tin Man stove after the Smokies. Anyone else contemplating the Wind Pro? Don't hear too much about it on these forums.....
    WhoAh

  7. #7
    First Sergeant SGT Rock's Avatar
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    Never heard of it. Got a link?
    SGT Rock
    http://hikinghq.net

    My 2008 Trail Journal of the BMT/AT

    BMT Thru-Hikers' Guide
    -----------------------------------------

    NO SNIVELING

  8. #8

  9. #9
    First Sergeant SGT Rock's Avatar
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    Ohhh, remote canister.

    I have never used a remote canister gas stove like that.

    One stove I have looked at is the Coleman Exponent F1 Ultralight. Without all that fancy extra stuff of the JetBoil they came in close to the JetBoil performance over on BPL tests. I figure if you can get similar performance with a more "normal" pot it would be worth looking into.
    SGT Rock
    http://hikinghq.net

    My 2008 Trail Journal of the BMT/AT

    BMT Thru-Hikers' Guide
    -----------------------------------------

    NO SNIVELING

  10. #10
    Hiker Trash! WhoAh's Avatar
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    Default

    Just did some weighing of my "kitchen" including the WindPro stove, gas canister, wind screen, Ti spork, Ti Pot, cozy, lighter, Ti mug, carrying bag - and the total came to just shy of 26 oz. Gotta figure out where to shave a couple of oz off of this - might just need to re-look at my TinMan stove....

    The canister is a 4 oz one, and I am not sure yet just how many meals this will actually make - need to do a little more testing to figure that out. So far I like this stove, especially the remote canister bit as it makes the stove a whole lot stabler.
    WhoAh

  11. #11
    Hiker bigcranky's Avatar
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    The remote canister style has one potential advantage -- in very cold weather, the canister can be turned upside down to feed liquid fuel to the stove. This eliminates the major problem with canister stoves not performing well in cold weather as the fuel stops evaporating.

    There is an article on Backpackinglight about this topic. Interesting read (members only, sorry).

    http://tinyurl.com/ebpkv
    Ken B
    'Big Cranky'
    Our Long Trail journal

  12. #12
    Registered User
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bigcranky
    There is an article on Backpackinglight about this topic. Interesting read (members only, sorry).

    http://tinyurl.com/ebpkv
    Copy and paste my friend, copy and paste
    There’s no point in the destination if you can't enjoy the journey.

  13. #13
    Registered User neo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrHappy
    So I have a jet-boil and I love the thing, because I do a lot of weekend-winter-camping in very cold temperatures, and the jet boil melts snow better than any MSR stoves i've tried (quite a few). Anyways, It is rather bulky, as are the fuel canisters, though not terribly heavy. Do you guys think it's suitable for a thru-hike? I'm planning on starting in January, and only cooking for the first few months when the warm food will be good for me, and then switching to all cold foods for the final months.
    i use mine every were i go,i even stayed at the president of jet boils house last year on my section hike neo

    http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/...imageuser=3462

    http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/...imageuser=3462

  14. #14
    Hiker Trash! WhoAh's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by skytoproberts
    Copy and paste my friend, copy and paste

    Yes, please.....
    WhoAh

  15. #15

    Default

    As long as you don't have to depend on finding cannisters at the trailheads, OK. The negatives I've heard about most of these type stoves are their performance in cold weather, heavy, and expensive fuel. Positives, cooks fast, low maintenance. I eliminated my stove worry on the trail, and thats fuel and clogging, cold weather, and elevation. I use a Sierra Zip woodburner. Had an alcohol and multifuel stove, haven't used either in years.

  16. #16
    Hopeful Hiker QHShowoman's Avatar
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    Default

    Although I don't own one (I prefer the tinman alcohol stove (solo) or the MSR pocketrocket (when I am cooking for 2-3 people), the MSR Windpro stoves are definitely workhorses. They are the backpacking stoves the store I work at rents out and they are easy to use and can definitely take a beating!
    you left to walk the appalachian trail
    you can feel your heart as smooth as a snail
    the mountains your darlings
    but better to love than have something to scale


    -Girlyman, "Hold It All At Bay"

  17. #17

    Default

    Another alcohol user with a good review of the windpro. We use our alky stove 90% of the time, but the windpro when car camping or some other situation where you need more fine control.

    Took a one burner propane stove on the river, mainly because of fuel availabilty. What a complete pain in the butt! I was ready to pitch that thing overboard by the end,

  18. #18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bigcranky
    The remote canister style has one potential advantage -- in very cold weather, the canister can be turned upside down to feed liquid fuel to the stove. This eliminates the major problem with canister stoves not performing well in cold weather as the fuel stops evaporating.

    There is an article on Backpackinglight about this topic. Interesting read (members only, sorry).

    http://tinyurl.com/ebpkv
    I use a similar design, the snowpeak gigapower BF, that has a low profile and very wide stable pot supports. It rocks with a outback oven, no danger of overheating the canister. I have a jetboil but have stopped using it, I'm just into doing real cooking even on overnight trips.

  19. #19
    Registered User neo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ridge
    As long as you don't have to depend on finding cannisters at the trailheads, OK. The negatives I've heard about most of these type stoves are their performance in cold weather, heavy, and expensive fuel. Positives, cooks fast, low maintenance. I eliminated my stove worry on the trail, and thats fuel and clogging, cold weather, and elevation. I use a Sierra Zip woodburner. Had an alcohol and multifuel stove, haven't used either in years.
    i have used mine down to 17 degrees neo

  20. #20
    Registered User neo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ridge
    As long as you don't have to depend on finding cannisters at the trailheads, OK. The negatives I've heard about most of these type stoves are their performance in cold weather, heavy, and expensive fuel. Positives, cooks fast, low maintenance. I eliminated my stove worry on the trail, and thats fuel and clogging, cold weather, and elevation. I use a Sierra Zip woodburner. Had an alcohol and multifuel stove, haven't used either in years.
    i have a sierra zip stove to,they are pretty awesome neo

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